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COVID-19 State-by-State Daily Updates Archive

Below is an aggregated list of COVID-19 state-by-state daily updates for the 1st Quarter of 2021.

View the aggregated list of daily updates for prior quarters:
Q4 2020Q3 2020 | Q2 2020 | Q1 2020

February 25, 2021

Alabama:

The Alabama Department of Public Health announced it is conducting a confidential online survey designed to learn more about the spread of COVID-19 and supplement the Department’s contact tracing efforts. Any Alabama resident who has ever tested positive for SARS-CoV-2 is asked to complete the survey.

Colorado:

Governor Polis extended an Executive Order pertaining to juvenile justice, allowing the Colorado Department of Human Services and the Division of Youth Services to continue to respond to the pandemic and undertake efforts to prevent and contain the spread of COVID at their facilities. The Governor also extended an Executive Order allowing the Colorado Department of Public Health & Environment’s Communities of Care program to reprioritize existing funds for COVID-19 response, as well as an Executive Order that allows veterinarians to provide telehealth services.

Connecticut:

As of February 25, 2021, Governor Lamont announced that Connecticut is expected to receive 30,000 doses of Johnson & Johnson’s COVID-19 vaccine next week, pending its approval by the U.S. Food & Drug Administration. The Governor announced that the state is also expecting 100,000 doses of the Moderna and Pfizer vaccines next week.

According to the Connecticut Department of Public Health, 116 of 169 towns and cities in Connecticut are currently in the red zone alert level, the highest of the state’s four levels. The only municipalities in the state that are not in the red zone this week are categorized as follows:

  • Orange Alert Level: Bethlehem, Canton, Cheshire, Chester, Coventry, East Granby, East Haddam, East Lyme, Easton, Farmington, Haddam, Hebron, Litchfield, Monroe, Newtown, Oxford, Putnam, Redding, Salisbury, Simsbury, Somers, Southbury, Stafford, Sterling, Weston, Westport, Willington, Winchester, Windsor Locks, and Woodstock;
  • Yellow Alert Level: Bolton, Burlington, Granby, Middlefield, Old Lyme, Tolland, and Woodbury; and
  • Gray Alert Level: Barkhamsted, Bridgewater, Canaan, Colebrook, Cornwall, Eastford, Franklin, Goshen, Lisbon, Morris, New Hartford, Norfolk, Pomfret, Roxbury, Scotland, and Warren.

On February 24, 2021, the Connecticut House of Representatives passed House Bill 6516 (An Act Mitigating Adverse Tax Consequences Resulting from Employees Working Remotely During COVID-19, and Concerning the Removal of Liens on the Property of Public Assistance Beneficiaries and a Three-Tiered Grants in Lieu of Taxes Program). The Bill must next be approved by the State Senate.

Florida:

(Miami-Dade County): On February 24, 2021, Mayor Daniella Cava issued an executive order further extending the state of local emergency for an additional seven-day period, beginning on February 25, 2021. The order was accompanied by an affidavit justifying the extension.

Illinois:

Governor Pritzker announced an expansion of vaccine eligibility during Phase 1B to Illinoisans with serious medical conditions. The expansion includes residents 16 and older with disabilities or underlying conditions who were not otherwise covered in previous eligibility categories. The expanded list of eligible conditions includes cancer, chronic kidney disease, Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD), diabetes, heart conditions, immunosuppressed states from a solid organ transplant, smoking, obesity, pregnancy, pulmonary diseases, and sickle cell disease.

Kansas:

(Wyandotte and Johnson Counties): On February 23, 2021, Wyandotte and Johnson counties announced they will join the rest of the Kansas City metro and lift curfews on bars and restaurants. In a joint announcement, health officials said the two counties will allow bars and restaurants to resume normal hours, but other restrictions remain in place. Both Johnson and Wyandotte counties require businesses to separate tables by six feet, plus limit parties to no more than eight people. Johnson County limits parties to no more than 10 at a table.

The Johnson County Board of Commissioners on Thursday voted unanimously to remove a midnight curfew on businesses that serve alcohol, effective immediately. The rest of the county’s health order, including a gathering limit for some venues, stays in place until the end of March.

Wyandotte County is also lifting curfew, effective February 24. Wyandotte County previously required bars and restaurants to stop serving alcohol at midnight and to close at 12:30 a.m. Those businesses are still restricted to 50% capacity, unlike in Johnson County.

Massachusetts:

Governor Baker-Polito issued Order No. 65, rescinding Order No. 58 as of 12:01 a.m. on March 1, 2021. Under Order No. 65, the entire commonwealth will advance to Phase III, Step 2, and all workplace safety rules for this step will be in effect. Specifically, certain indoor performance venues and indoor recreational activities are permitted to resume.

Minnesota:

On February 25, 2021, Governor Walz announced Minnesota will remain focused on vaccinating the majority of the state’s senior population before expanding eligibility of the COVID-19 vaccine. The Governor issued guidance to vaccinate 70% of adults 65 years of age and older before expanding eligibility, aiming to achieve this goal by the end of March. As of February 25, Minnesota has vaccinated more than 43% of Minnesotans age 65 and over. Once 70% of seniors have received the vaccine, Minnesota will expand eligibility based on underlying health conditions and workplace exposure risk. Details on the vaccination phases are available on the COVID-19 Response website.

New York:

Governor Cuomo announced another 12 community-based pop-up vaccination sites beginning this week at community centers, public housing complexes, and cultural centers. Since January, more than 100 community-based pop-up sites have been administering COVID-19 vaccines. Like other community-based pop-up sites, these will be re-established in three weeks to administer second doses.

North Carolina:

On February 24, 2021, Governor Roy Cooper announced that the state will carefully ease some of its COVID-19 restrictions. Executive Order No. 195 lifts the Modified Stay at Home Order requiring people to stay at home and businesses to close to the public between 10:00 p.m. and 5:00 a.m. Safety protocols such as masks, social distancing, and frequent handwashing will still be required. Executive Order No. 195 will take effect February 26th at 5:00 p.m. and will expire March 26th at 5:00 p.m.

Under the Order, the number of people who may gather indoors will increase from 10 to 25, while 50 remains the limit for outdoor gatherings. The curfew on the sale of alcohol for onsite consumption will be moved from 9:00 p.m. to 11:00 p.m. Some businesses, including bars and amusement parks, will now be open for patrons indoors, in compliance with new occupancy restrictions. Many businesses, venues, and arenas will have increased occupancy both indoors and outdoors.

The Executive Order has two general categories of occupancy restrictions: 30% capacity and 50% capacity. Indoor facilities in the 30%-occupancy category may not exceed two hundred fifty (250) people per indoor room or indoor space. Such facilities include:

  • Bars;
  • Meeting, Reception, and Conference Spaces;
  • Lounges (including tobacco lounges) and Night Clubs;
  • Indoor areas of Amusement Parks;
  • Movie Theaters;
  • Entertainment facilities (such as bingo parlors and gaming establishments);
  • Sports Arenas and Fields; and
  • Venues (although indoor event venues with more than 5,000 seats may be excepted from the 250-person limit if they follow additional safety measures, up to 15% capacity).

50% capacity limit pertain to the following facilities:

  • Restaurants;
  • Breweries, Wineries, and Distilleries;
  • Fitness and Physical Activity Facilities (for example, gyms, bowling alleys, and rock climbing facilities);
  • Pools;
  • Museums and Aquariums;
  • Retailers;
  • Outdoor areas of Amusement Parks; and
  • Salons, Personal Care, and Tattoo Parlors.

Teachers are now eligible to receive vaccination as the state begins to expand access to group 3 essential workers. Due to shipping delays caused by inclement weather, DHHS continues to work with providers to administer both last week’s and this week’s shipments and exhaust first dose supply before next week’s shipment arrives.

Ohio:

On February 25, 2021, Governor Mike DeWine announced Ohio will soon lift COVID-19 restrictions on sports venues, banquet halls, wedding receptions, and more. Ohio sports venues will be able to have fans at games again, up to 25% capacity at indoor venues and 30% at outdoor venues. The venues must require mask wearing for employees and customers, arrange seating in pods of no more than six people, and separate groups of spectators by at least 6 feet.

Forthcoming health orders will outline rules for sports venues, restaurants, and catering and banquet facilities to take effect Monday. Those orders will affect proms, weddings, and other spring and summer events. Governor DeWine said he plans to announce further changes to rules for fairs, festivals, and parades.

Ohio will get 91,000 doses of the Johnson & Johnson vaccine in the first week after it receives authorization from the federal Food and Drug Administration. In addition, Ohio expects to get 310,000 first doses of the Pfizer and Moderna vaccines next week. Snow days have delayed shots for some school employees, but the first round of vaccine doses for that group should conclude next week.

Whenever Ohio moves into the next phase, eligibility will be based on age: first people age 60-64, then 55-59, followed by 50-54. The start date of the next phase has not yet been determined.

Oregon:

Governor Brown extended her declaration of a state of emergency related to COVID-19 for an additional 60 days, now set to expire on May 2, 2021. This declaration allows Governor Brown to continue to exercise certain emergency powers.

Vermont:

On February 25, 2021, the Vermont Department of Public Health announced that Vermonters age 65 and older can start making appointments as of February 25 to receive their COVID-19 vaccinations at Walgreens locations. Statewide clinics for this age group which will begin taking appointments March 1.

Wisconsin:

(Madison/Dane County): On February 25, 2021, The Wisconsin Department of Health Services (DHS) established a new process for allocating vaccines to Wisconsin’s teachers and childcare workers. While the state made these groups eligible to receive the vaccine beginning March 1, the number of doses allocated by the state to Dane County has delayed efforts to vaccinate these groups. Due to the limited availability of the vaccine, vaccinators are prioritizing individuals 65 and over, education staff, and childcare workers.

The Public Health Department of Madison & Dane County will provide information about the start of vaccinations to school districts and childcare facilities for their staff. Other groups that become eligible March 1 (including individuals enrolled in Medicaid long-term care programs, some public-facing essential workers, non-frontline essential healthcare personnel, and facility staff and residents in congregate living settings) are not expected to be vaccinated until April or May.

Wyoming:

On February 25, 2021, the Wyoming Department of Public Health announced changes to public health orders related to COVID-19. The revisions will take effect on March 1 and will include the following relaxed measures:

  • Elimination of Order #3, thereby allowing for continued business at salons, barber shops, cosmetology services, etc.
  • Further easing of restrictions on indoor and outdoor events, including increases in event sizes.
  • Lessening of restrictions on organized sports and artistic performances.
  • Further easing of restrictions on restaurants, allowing for 10-member groups to be seated together.
  • Reduced requirements pertaining to staff screening logs and signage.

The statewide order for mask use remains in effect.

Presidential Actions for February 25, 2021

Presidential Executive Orders: The Biden Administration has issued Executive Order on America’s Supply Chains calling for a review of America’s supply chain.

Within 100 days, specified agencies must submit the following reports to the President:

  • The Secretary of Commerce will identify risks in the semiconductor manufacturing and advanced packing supply chains and make policy recommendations to address risks.
  • The Secretary of Energy will identify risks in the supply chains for high-capacity batteries, including electric vehicle batteries, and policy make recommendations to address risks.
  • The Secretary of Defense will identify risks in the supply chain for critical minerals and other identified strategic materials, including rare earth elements, and make policy recommendations to address the risks.
  • The Secretary of Health and Human Services will identify risks in the supply chain for pharmaceuticals and active pharmaceutical ingredients, and make policy recommendations to address these risks.

Within 1 year, specified agencies will submit the following reports to the President:

  • The Secretary of Defense must report on supply chains for the defense industrial base and identify where civilian supply chains are dependent upon competitor nations.
  • The Secretary of Health and Human Services must report on supply chains for the public health and biological preparedness industrial base.
  • The Secretary of Commerce and Secretary of Homeland Security must report on supply chains for critical sectors and subsectors of the information and communications technology (ICT) industrial base, including the industrial base for the development of ICT software, data, and associated services.
  • The Secretary of Energy must submit a report on supply chains for the energy sector industrial base.
  • The Secretary of Transportation must report on supply chains for the transportation industrial base.
  • The Secretary of Agriculture must report on supply chains for the production of agricultural commodities and food products.

A Proclamation on Revoking Proclamation 10014 revokes Proclamation 10014 (Suspension of Entry of Immigrants Who Present a Risk to the United States Labor Market During the Economic Recovery Following the 2019 Novel Coronavirus Outbreak) that was issued on April 22, 2020 and extended by section 1 of both Proclamation 10052 and 10131. Proclamation 10014 suspended entry of aliens into the U.S. who did not have a valid immigrant visa or official travel document. The new revocation proclamation directs the Secretaries of State, Labor, and Homeland Security to review any regulations, orders, guidance documents, policies, and other similar agency actions developed pursuant to Proclamation 10014 and issue revised guidance as appropriate.

February 24, 2021

Alabama:

As of February 24, 2021, CVS announced that it will be administering the COVID-19 vaccination in select locations in Alabama. Appointments are available for eligible people at select CVS stores in the following cities/towns:

  • Bayou La Batre;
  • Camden;
  • Evergreen;
  • Greensboro;
  • Jackson;
  • Lanett;
  • Moulton;
  • Tuskegee; and
  • Union Springs.

Eligible people include those that are at least 65 years old and frontline essential workers.

Arkansas:

On February 23, 2021, the Arkansas House passed two bills related to the impact of federal COVID-19 relief on taxes in the state. Separately, the Arkansas Senate passed a bill related to tax exemptions and unemployment benefits.

  • HB 1361 excludes certain federal aid from the state’s definition of income, such as loans given under the Paycheck Protection Program (PPP), Small Business Association grants under the Economic Injury Disaster Loan Program, and payments received under the Coronavirus Food Assistance Program. The bill has been referred to a Senate committee, and if advanced, will be voted on by the Senate.
  • HB 1049 would allow recipients of unemployment benefits to authorize the state to withhold income taxes from those benefits, possibly beginning in 2022. The bill has been referred to a Senate committee, and if advanced, will be voted on by the Senate.
  • SB 236 would exempt federal and state unemployment benefits from state income taxes in 2020 and 2021. The bill still needs to be considered by a House committee and, if advanced, voted on by the House.

Colorado:

Governor Polis amended and extended an Executive Order establishing directives for the COVID-19 Dial Framework to allow the Colorado Department of Public Health to add certain restrictions to level Red by Public Health Order. The Order expires March 23, 2021.

As of February 24, 2021, six of Colorado’s 64 counties are at level Orange. The remaining counties (including counties in the Denver Metro area) are either Yellow or Blue. Colors by increasing order of severity of the outbreak are as follows: Green, Blue, Yellow, Orange, Red, Purple. 824,298 people (14%) have been immunized with one dose of the vaccine, and 411,107 people (7%) have completed vaccination (been immunized with two doses of the vaccine).

Connecticut:

On February 24, 2021 Governor Lamont announced that his administration has filed an objection to motions under consideration at the Public Utilities Regulatory Authority (PURA) that would begin allowing for the disconnection of customers for non-payment. The plans were submitted by Eversource Energy and the United Illuminating Company and would effectively terminate the shut-off moratorium that was put in place due to the COVID-19 pandemic. The shut-off moratorium has provided important financial relief to those affected by the virus and contributes to significant social and health benefits. According to a study by the National Bureau of Economic Research, “moratoria on utility disconnections reduce[d] COVID-19 infections by 4.4 percent and mortality rates by 7.4 percent.”

In its objection, made through the Department of Energy and Environmental Protection, the administration argues that disconnections should not resume until additional protections for struggling ratepayers are in place. The administration specifically noted that many ratepayers will soon be eligible for some level of assistance from the federal government, which has designated more than $200 million to Connecticut to assist renters with rent and utility payments. The administration also stated that PURA should consider extending repayment terms beyond 24 months for the COVID-19 Repayment Plan.

District of Columbia:

On February 24, 2021, Mayor Bowser announced that DC Residents with qualifying medical conditions can begin making vaccination appointments on February 25 at 9:00 a.m. through vaccinate.dc.gov or by calling the District’s coronavirus Call Center. Qualifying medical conditions include:

  • Asthma, Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD), and other Chronic Lung Disease;
  • Bone Marrow and Solid Organ Transplantation;
  • Cancer;
  • Cerebrovascular Disease;
  • Chronic Kidney Disease or Liver Disease;
  • Congenital Heart Disease and other Heart Conditions, such as Heart Failure, Coronary Artery Disease, or Cardiomyopathies;
  • Diabetes Mellitus;
  • HIV;
  • Hypertension;
  • Immunocompromised State;
  • Inherited Metabolic Disorders;
  • Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities;
  • Neurologic Conditions;
  • Obesity (BMI ≥ 30 kg/m2);
  • Pregnancy;
  • Severe Genetic Disorders;
  • Sickle Cell Disease; and
  • Thalassemia.

Florida:

(Broward County): On February 19, 2021, County Administrator Bertha Henry issued a Declaration of Emergency further extending the local state of emergency for 7 days, starting at 9:00 a.m. on February 23, 2021.

Hawaii:

(Honolulu City and County): On February 22, 2021, Mayor Blangiardi issued Emergency Order 2021-02, which implements Honolulu’s reopening Tier 3 framework. The key changes from Emergency Order 2021-01 include:

  • Increases gathering size limits to 10 people, including at city and state parks and beaches;
  • Increases in the permitted size of performing groups to 10 people; and
  • Removal of the occupancy limitation of 50% for indoor retail businesses.

This Order supersedes all prior Orders issued by the Office of the Mayor. The Order takes effect on February 25, 2021 and continues through April 10, 2021, unless movement to another tier is required earlier by Honolulu’s COVID-19 Reopening Framework.

Illinois:

(Chicago): The City of Chicago updated its Emergency Travel Order to include 31 states in the “orange” tier. Travelers to the city of Chicago coming from orange tier states must either quarantine for 10 days prior to traveling or present a negative COVID test before arrival. States in the orange tier, meaning those that have a rolling 7-day average above 15 cases per day per 100,000 residents, include:

  • Alabama
  • Alaska
  • Arizona
  • California
  • Colorado
  • Connecticut
  • Delaware
  • Florida
  • Georgia
  • Iowa
  • Kansas
  • Kentucky
  • Massachusetts
  • Montana
  • New Hampshire
  • New Jersey
  • New Mexico
  • New York
  • North Carolina
  • Ohio
  • Oklahoma
  • Pennsylvania
  • Rhode Island
  • South Carolina
  • South Dakota
  • Tennessee
  • Utah
  • Vermont
  • Virginia
  • West Virginia
  • Wyoming

The order also moved 17 states into the “yellow” tier. Travelers coming from states in the yellow tier are not required to quarantine or present a negative COVID test but remain under an advisory to avoid all non-essential travel. States in the yellow tier are those that have a rolling 7-day average above 15 cases/day/100k residents. States in the yellow tier are:

  • Arkansas
  • Hawaii
  • Idaho
  • Indiana
  • Louisiana
  • Maine
  • Maryland
  • Michigan
  • Minnesota
  • Mississippi
  • Missouri
  • Nebraska
  • Nevada
  • Oregon
  • Puerto Rico
  • Texas
  • Washington
  • Washington D.C.
  • Wisconsin

Travelers that are fully vaccinated are exempt from the travel requirements.

Kansas:

On February 24, 2021, Governor Laura Kelly issued an executive order allowing temporary authorization for additional vaccinators during the state of disaster emergency. Executive Order #21-06 allows state healthcare professionals, such as pharmacy students, dentists, paramedics, and others who may administer injections or inoculations within their scope of practice, to administer a coronavirus vaccine that is approved or authorized by the federal Food and Drug Administration.

Mississippi:

On February 23, 2021, Governor Reeves signed Executive Order 1547, which suspends the statutory requirement that county election commissioners attend a training seminar provided by the Office of the Secretary of State, complete a skills assessment, and file a certification of completion of the skills assessment by April 30, 2021. County election commissioners still must meet the above requirements, but they now have until July 31, 2021 to do so.

Nebraska:

Vaccine outreach within the state is ongoing. On February 25, 2021, there will be three opportunities for Nebraskans to learn about vaccination:

  • 1:15 p.m., Facebook Live (English): Dr. Gary Anthone and Sara Morgan from the Division of Public Health will discuss updated vaccine distribution deadlines and the increase in vaccine allocations.
  • 3:30 p.m., Bluestem Health (Spanish): Health Disparities and Health Equity Administrator Josie Rodriguez will listen to community concerns, and Spanish-speaking doctors will answer questions and share information on the safety and importance of the COVID-19 vaccine. The event password is vaccine.
  • 7:00 p.m., New Era Baptist Convention of Nebraska: DHHS CEO Dannette Smith, medical experts from CHI Health, and community leaders will host an online town hall to discuss vaccination. The event passcode is 007704.

New Jersey:

Governor Murphy announced that $29.5 million in federal funding will be available to New Jersey’s institutions of higher education amid the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic. These funds will be available through two programs:

  • The Opportunity Meets Innovation Challenge Grant will give $28.5 million to help develop sustainable system-wide reforms of historically disadvantaged populations.
  • The Hunger-Free Campus Grant Program will receive $1 million, and it aims to address food insecurity among students enrolled in public institutions.

New York:

Governor Cuomo announced eligible New Yorkers in Buffalo, Rochester, Albany area, and Yonkers area can begin making appointments to receive the COVID-19 vaccine at the previously announced FEMA community-based vaccination sites opening on March 3, 2020. During the first week, the vaccination appointments are reserved for New Yorkers currently eligible for vaccination living in areas with low vaccination rates.

Oregon:

Governor Brown announced that 16 counties moved to an improved risk level in the latest biweekly update, while three counties moved to a higher risk level. The changes to risk levels will go into effect on February 26 and will be accompanied by updates to what is or is not permitted in each county, which are outlined in detail on Oregon’s coronavirus website.

Currently:

  • Five counties are at the Extreme Risk level;
  • 11 are at the High Risk level;
  • Ten are at Moderate Risk; and
  • Ten are at Lower Risk.

Tennessee:

Kroger Health announced February 24, 2021 that it has received a limited supply of the COVID-19 vaccine and will begin administering the vaccine in its 115 pharmacies across Tennessee. Appointments can be made by visiting Kroger.com/covidvaccine or by calling 866-211-5320.

Utah:

On February 23, 2021, Governor Cox issued an executive order that provides updates to the state’s COVID-19 vaccination plan. The order states that COVID vaccination eligibility will now be at the direction of the Utah Department of Health. Additionally, the order reiterates the previously established vaccine provider requirements. No changes were made to current vaccine eligibility.

Virginia:

On February 24, 2021, Governor Northam announced a gradual easing of certain COVID-19 related measures. Governor Northam amended Executive Order 72 to safely and gradually ease public health restrictions while still mitigating the spread of COVID-19. The changes are effective March 1, 2021 and will remain effective through at least April 1. The key changes include:

  • The limit on outdoor social gatherings has been increased from 10 to 25 people (but the limit for indoor gatherings remains at 10 people).
  • Outdoor entertainment and public amusement venues can operate with up to 1,000 people or at 30 percent capacity, whichever is lower (but indoor entertainment and public amusement venues must continue to operate at 30 percent capacity with a cap of 250 people).
  • The on-site sale, consumption, and possession of alcohol is permitted until 12:00 a.m., extended from 10 pm.
  • All restaurants, dining establishments, food courts, breweries, microbreweries, distilleries, wineries, and tasting rooms must be closed between midnight and 5:00 a.m.
  • As of May 1, 2021, overnight summer camps will be open with strict mitigation measures in place.

Mitigation measures may be further eased if key health measures continue to improve. Current guidelines for retail businesses, fitness and exercise, large amusement venues, and personal grooming services will remain in place. Individuals are strongly encouraged to continue teleworking if possible.

The modified Stay at Home order expires on February 28, 2021. Governor Northam reiterated, however, that Virginia still maintains the Safer at Home strategy with continued strict health and safety protocols, including physical distancing, mask-wearing requirements, gathering limits, and business capacity restrictions.

Washington:

Governor Inslee issued a proclamation, Proclamation 20-22.8, extending earlier proclamations whereby truck drivers collecting or delivering the following goods are exempt from regulations regarding hour caps:

  • Livestock and livestock feed;
  • Medical supplies and equipment related to the testing and treatment of COVID-19;
  • Vaccines and related supplies or ingredients, as well as other supplies used for the prevention of COVID-19;
  • Supplies related to community health, including but not limited to masks and gloves; and
  • Food, paper products, and other groceries for the emergency restocking of distribution centers or stores.

The Proclamation will remain in effect through May 31, 2021.

West Virginia:

On February 24, 2021, Governor Jim Justice announced the West Virginia Board of Education passed a motion requiring grades PreK-8 to return to five-day a week instruction statewide no later than March 3, 2021. This motion replaces the Board’s January 13, 2021 motion that required counties to offer at least blended learning. This does not affect families who have chosen virtual learning for their children; those children may continue virtual learning. The Board also recommended high schools return to five days of in-person instruction. At present, however, grades 9-12 may continue blended instruction if the infection rate in the community is too high.

Presidential Actions for February 24, 2021

Presidential Executive Orders: On February 24, 2021, President Joe Biden announced the continuation of the National Emergency declared under President Donald Trump on March 13, 2020 due to the significant risk to the public health and safety of the country. Through the Notice on the Continuation of the National Emergency Concerning the Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) Pandemic, President Biden is permitted to exercise powers and authorities conferred to the President during times of national emergency.

February 23, 2021

Alaska:

Alaska has expanded eligibility for those seeking COVID-19 vaccinations. Alaskans now eligible include:

  • People 65 years and above;
  • People 50 years and above with a high-risk medical condition;
  • People 50 years and above who are essential and must work within six feet of others;
  • PreK-12 and childcare education staff;
  • Most health care workers; and
  • People living or working in congregate settings.

California:

On February 23, 2021, Governor Newsom signed into law a package of immediate relief actions in an effort to help small businesses facing economic hardship as a result of the COVID-19 pandemic. The package provides for:

  • Increased for grants up to $25,000 for small businesses;
  • An allocation of $50 million for non-profit cultural institutions; and
  • Two years of fee relief for heavily-impacted business licenses.

The package also provides relief for individuals and families. Under this legislation, qualifying individuals will be eligible to receive one-time payments of $600. In addition to individual aid, the legislation allocates over $400 million in new federal funds to provide childcare stipends for each child enrolled in state-subsidized childcare and preschool.

Connecticut:

On February 19, 2021, Governor Lamont announced his administration will be partnering with Health Equity Solutions on an outreach program aimed at ensuring as many people as possible have access to information about the COVID-19 vaccine. This program is particularly focused on reaching communities that have historically been disproportionately impacted by limited access to health care. Health Equity Solutions developed a plan to reach over 10,000 people of color living in Connecticut over a three-month span and has already started outreach to community members through events and webinars.

Illinois:

Governor Pritzker announced that one million Illinois children will receive federally funded food benefits through the Pandemic Electronic Benefit Transfer following expansion of eligibility due to the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic. The food support is funded through the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Food and Nutrition Service and will be distributed by the Illinois Department of Human Services. The expansion of the program will reach about 200,000 more Illinois children as compared to last year.

Kansas:

On February 23, 2021, Governor Kelly announced that funding provided to the Kansas hospitality industry through the Hospitality Industry Relief Emergency (HIRE) Fund has been converted from bridge loans to grants. The HIRE Fund was established as a working capital loan program through NetWork Kansas in March of 2020 to provide immediate relief to Kansas hospitality businesses faced with revenue losses due to COVID-19. In total, $5 million was delivered to 344 businesses in communities statewide.

Under the change, these funds will no longer need to be paid back, and businesses that have already made repayments will be reimbursed. All HIRE recipients will receive an email with details on the process and timeframes involved with this conversion. The Department of Commerce will notify the partners/organizations that are assisting with collections to stop collections and forward all funds to NetWork Kansas for reconciliation. Businesses can expect the process of issuing repayment and other paperwork to be completed in the next 30 days.

Maryland:

On February 23, 2021, Governor Hogan announced the opening of a FEMA-supported mass vaccination site no later than March 11 at Regency Furniture Stadium in Charles County. FEMA will provide more than 100 personnel—including trained vaccinators—to help staff the site and provide technical assistance.

Also on February 23, Governor Hogan ordered that face coverings are required for anyone over the age of five in school settings where interaction with others is likely, including classrooms, hallways, cafeterias, auditoriums, and gymnasiums.

Mississippi:

Mississippi has expanded eligibility for those seeking COVID-19 vaccinations. As of March 1, 2021, the following Mississippians will be eligible:

  • Teachers, staff, and employees in PreK-12 or childcare settings; and
  • Public safety personnel, including law enforcement, public safety, fire services, and emergency management workers.

Adults aged 65 and older, anyone 16-64 years old with a chronic health condition, long-term care facility residents and staff, and health care personnel are still eligible to receive the vaccine.

Nebraska:

Nebraska DHHS is continuing its efforts to reach the African American Community. The latest partnership related to this endeavor is between DHHS, the Douglas County Health Department, the institute for Urban Development, and the Charles Drew Health Center of North Omaha. This partnership, through virtual town halls and program development, is intended to provide “an opportunity for public health agencies and officials to increase trust within the African American community.”

New Jersey:

Governor Murphy delivered his fourth annual budget on February 23, 2021. Part of the budget proposal includes $200 million in relief for small businesses.

North Dakota:

On February 22, Governor Burgum signed Executive Order 2021-05 terminating several prior orders issued during the COVID-19 pandemic. The terminated orders relate to the following:

  • Temporary emergency licensing requirements for healthcare facilities and workers;
  • Workers’ compensation eligibility for first responders, health care workers, funeral home directors and employees, and individuals providing care to those with intellectual or development disabilities;
  • The transfer of surplus state property needed for the COVID-19 response;
  • The reopening of certain businesses;
  • Work registration requirements for persons seeking unemployment benefits; and
  • Public hearings conducted by the Department of Environmental Quality.

According to the Governor, the terminated orders have fulfilled their stated objectives, and are thus no longer necessary.

This week, voluntary vaccinations began for staff and residents at North Dakota Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation facilities. First round vaccinations are expected to be completed by the end of next week.

Ohio:

On February 22, 2021, Governor DeWine and Lt. Governor Husted announced that the delivery of some Pfizer vaccines and all Moderna vaccines were delayed due to last week's winter weather.

As the number of long-term care facility cases in the state continues to drop, Governor DeWine today reminded nursing home staff and families of residents about the status of visitation in Ohio's nursing homes. Visitation is permitted at nursing homes in Ohio if the facilities meet the federal Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) criteria:

  • No new onset of COVID-19 cases in the last 14 days;
  • The facility is not currently conducting outbreak testing; and
  • CMS reports the COVID-19 county positivity rate at less than 10%.

Compassionate care visits, which are special visits in which a family member or other visitor provides comfort, support, and assistance to a resident whose well-being is suffering or at risk, are always permitted regardless of the criteria above.

Governor DeWine sent a letter today to all long-term care facilities in Ohio reminding them to check their county positivity rate every week to determine their visitation status and to remind them to allow for compassionate care visits.

Governor DeWine provided information on the progression of vaccine eligibility in Ohio. Because those aged 65 and older make up approximately 87% of all COVID-19 deaths in Ohio, no additional age groups are eligible for the vaccine at this time. Once the demand for the vaccine has been met for those 65 and older, those aged 60 and older will become eligible, followed by those aged 55 and older, followed by those aged 50 and up. Individuals in specific small groups that have an increased risk of exposure to the virus may also potentially be included in the 60 and older vaccination phase.

Last week, vaccine eligibility opened to Ohioans born with certain conditions or who had early childhood conditions that continued into adulthood. Today, Governor DeWine asked Ohio hospitals and doctors with access to the vaccine to reach out to patients with the specific medical conditions outlined in Phase 1B to schedule vaccinations.

Rhode Island:

Governor Raimondo issued Executive Order 21-16 on February 23, 2021, and extended the following executive orders through March 24, 2021:

  • Executive Order 20-06 (Fourth Supplemental Emergency Declaration - Expanding Access to Telemedicine Services): Suspending the patient location requirement for telemedicine and allowing patients to receive telemedicine services at any location.
  • Executive Order 20-16 (Thirteenth Supplemental Emergency Declaration - Authorizing Waiver and Medicaid State Plan Amendments and Adjustments to Essential Provider Rates): Authorizing the Executive Office of Health and Human Services to seek permission from the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid services to implement a temporary waiver and temporary changes to provisions of the Medicaid State Plan.
  • Executive Order 20-17 (Fourteenth Supplemental Emergency Declaration - Testing, Critical Supplies and Hospital Capacity Reporting): Requiring hospitals to submit daily reports to state and federal authorities on COVID-19 data, including bed capacity, necessary supplies, and hospital bed utilization.
  • Executive Order 20-19 (Sixteenth Supplemental Emergency Declaration - Increasing Access to Unemployment Insurance): Suspending charges to employer accounts under Rhode Island General Laws 28-43-2(2)(ii) and relaxing restrictions on post-retirement employment by retirees identified by the Department of Labor and Training to have skills, training, or knowledge needed to address COVID-19.
  • Executive Order 20-70 (Sixty-Fifth Supplemental Emergency Declaration - Hospital and Community-Based Health Care): Suspending hospital and nursing home statutes and rules to allow expanded hospital capacity, and providing statutory immunity for hospitals, healthcare workers, and others assisting the State’s response to the COVID-19 pandemic.
  • Executive Order 20-72 (Sixty-Seventh Supplemental Emergency Declaration - COVID-19 Emergency Regulations): Suspending the one-time sixty-day renewal limit for all existing and new emergency rules promulgated in relation to the COVID-19 emergency.
  • Executive Order 20-94 (Eighty-Ninth Supplemental Emergency Declaration - Continuing to Require Cloth Face Coverings in Public): Requiring that people wear a face covering over their mouth and nose while indoors and outdoors.
  • Executive Order 20-110 (One Hundred and Fifth Supplemental Emergency Declaration - Increasing Teaching and Administrative Staff Capacity): Suspending post-retirement restrictions for teaching and administrative staff members identified by their local educational agency.

Vermont:

On February 23, 2021, the Vermont Department of Public Health announced new gathering guidelines for individuals who have been fully vaccinated. To be considered fully vaccinated, two weeks must have passed since the individual’s final dose of the vaccine. This updated guidance allows vaccinated individuals to gather with one other household.

Washington:

The Washington Utilities and Transportation Commission extended protections, previously set to expire on April 30, through July 31, 2021. These protections keep customers from being disconnected from utilities until August 1, at the earliest, and waives any late fees through January 27, 2022.

February 22, 2021

Alabama:

Governor Ivey’s Amended Safer at Home Order remains in effect until March 5 at 5:00 p.m. Currently, none of Alabama’s 67 counties are in the High Risk (Orange) or Very High Risk (Red) Risk Indicator Categories. There are, however, 27 Alabama Counties within the Moderate Risk (Yellow) Category, including: Autauga, Baldwin, Barbour, Bullock, Calhoun, Chilton, Cleburne, Coosa, Covington, Crenshaw, Dale, DeKalb, Elmore, Etowah, Greene, Henry, Houston, Jackson, Lamar, Limestone, Lowndes, Madison, Marion, Montgomery, Russell, Shelby, and Talladega.

Colorado:

The Colorado Workforce Development Council (CWDC), in partnership with the Trailhead Institute and the Colorado Public Health Workforce Collaborative, has launched newly-developed career pathways in public health on the My Colorado Journey platform. The pathways aim to address the demand for a skilled public health workforce heightened by the COVID-19 pandemic, strengthen continued career development, and raise awareness of the field.

Connecticut:

On February 22, 2021, Governor Lamont announced that the state will continue to prioritize vaccine eligibility based on age. Ninety-six percent of COVID-19 deaths in Connecticut have occurred in people over the age of 55, and Governor Lamont believes the current age-based approach to be the most equitable and efficient means administering the vaccine. The planned schedule for age-based eligibility is as follows:

  • March 1, 2021: Expands to age group 55 to 64
  • March 22, 2021: Expands to age group 45 to 54
  • April 12, 2021: Expands to age group 35 to 44
  • May 3, 2021: Expands to age group 16 to 34

So far, the state has vaccinated 70 percent of the population age 75 and over and 37 percent of the population between the ages of 65 and 74.

In the coming days, the state’s Department of Public Health, per the direction of Governor Lamont, will be setting numerical targets related to vaccine administration in high-risk communities. Further, preK-12 school staff and teachers, as well as professional childcare providers, will be eligible for vaccination in March. Information regarding vaccine scheduling for educators and childcare professionals will come directly from school administrators/employers soon.

District of Columbia:

On February 18, 2021, Mayor Bowser delivered a COVID-19 Situational Report, announcing that 2,450 vaccination appointments would become available to DC residents in priority zip codes who are at least 65 years old and/or are members of an eligible workforce group. The report also announced that beginning the week of March 1, DC would be vaccinating Phase 1C Tier 1, which includes DC Residents who are 16-64 years old with qualifying medical conditions.

Florida:

On February 19, 2021, Governor DeSantis announced the establishment of four COVID-19 federally-supported vaccination sites. The sites will open on March 3 and each will administer 2,000 vaccines per day. Each site will also have two mobile satellite sites, bringing each site’s daily vaccination total to 3,000.

(Palm Beach County): On February 18, 2021, Mayor Kerner issued a Declaration of Continuing Emergency, further extending the state of local emergency through February 26, 2021. County Administrator Verdenia Baker also issued Emergency Order No. 2021-001, which extends Emergency Order 2020-012 (requiring the use of facial coverings in all businesses, establishments, and public spaces) until 12:01 a.m. on March 19, 2021.

Hawaii:

(Maui County): On February 19, 2021, Mayor Michael Victorio announced a new program to increase face mask usage throughout the county. The program, “Mask Up for Maui County,” enlists the help of volunteers to serve as community ambassadors who remind visitors and residents that wearing face masks is mandatory throughout the county.

(Kauai County): On February 19, 2021, Mayor Kawakami issued a Seventh Supplementary Emergency Proclamation, continuing the disaster relief or emergency period for an additional sixty days after the last effective date of the previous proclamation.

Illinois:

Illinois Governor JB Pritzker announced two additional state-supported mass vaccination sites in Rockford and Collinsville will launch on Tuesday, February 23, 2021. Each site will provide up to 1,350 doses per day at full capacity. Governor Pritzker is also activating additional members of the Illinois National Guard to support Winnebago and Madison counties in setting up additional mobile vaccination sites to reach rural and underserved communities.

Kansas:

On February 18, 2021, Governor Kelly announced new steps to address data reporting issues that have inaccurately identified the number of individuals vaccinated for COVID-19 in Kansas.

Reported vaccine administration rates in Kansas have been lower than expected, despite the qualitative reports of health care providers suggesting otherwise. The gap in reporting is due to inconsistencies and time lags between the state’s immunization registry (KS WebIZ) and the federal registry (CDC Vaccine Finder). Beginning next week, the Kelly administration, in partnership with enrolled health care providers, is implementing three processes to address the vaccine administration “gap”:

  • Introducing a new daily reporting snapshot for vaccine providers who have received or administered doses to report daily top-line data (doses received, administered, in inventory, and transferred) to:
    • Provide a much-needed accurate daily picture of progress getting vaccines to Kansans;
    • Help surface reporting issues in KSWebIZ so they can be addressed; and
    • Allow for a targeted resolution of reporting or administration issues impacting the state overall.
  • Improving existing reporting by requiring providers with known reporting issues to submit a templated excel file of patient-level administration data to to KSWebIZ and KDHE in order to:
    • Ensure more complete data is reported in Kansas;
    • Reduce errors and account for doses that have been delivered but have not yet been reported as administered or in inventory; and
    • Directly correct reported CDC numbers to reflect reality.
  • Addressing underlying technical issues with the underlying system and data transfer issues between provider systems, WebIZ and the CDC.

All three actions aim to address the gap in administration data between what is seen in state and local sources and the actual progress providers are making vaccinating Kansans. In tandem, the Kelly administration is working with the KSWebIZ vendor to identify and resolve the long-term data issues.

On November 2020, 2021, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) issued interim clinical guidelines for mRNA vaccines (the Pfizer-BioNTech and Moderna COVID-19 vaccines). The CDC mRNA Immunization Guidelines recommend modifying the timing of blood draws or skin tests when the COVID-19 vaccine has been or will be administered. In response, on February 19, 2021, Governor Laura Kelly announced she signed Executive Order #21-04, temporarily suspending certain regulations regarding tuberculosis testing. COVID-19 vaccines may interfere with the accuracy of tuberculosis testing. As many residents in childcare and long-term care facilities are being vaccinated, it is critical to the state’s response that certain tuberculosis testing is deferred to encourage those staff and residents to get the vaccine. Several Kansas regulations require tuberculosis testing within a specific time frame when a new resident or staff person begins residing or working in certain facilities. This Order suspends those regulations and implements the CDC’s guidance.

Maryland:

On February 22, 2021, Governor Hogan announced that registration is open for eligible Marylanders to schedule COVID-19 vaccination appointments at the state’s newest mass vaccination site, which opens Thursday, February 25 at M&T Bank Stadium in Baltimore City. Individuals must complete a new registration specifically for the M&T Bank Stadium Mass Vaccination site, which will offer vaccinations to those who are eligible in Phases 1A, 1B, and 1C. Eligible individuals have two options for making an appointment:

  • Completing the online form available at covidvax.maryland.gov; or
  • Calling 855-MD-GOVAX (1-855-634-6829) to request an appointment. Representatives are available seven days a week from 7 a.m. to 10 p.m. Individuals should expect potential prolonged wait times on the phone due to call volume.

Minnesota:

On February 22, 2021, Governor Walz announced that Hy-Vee will be added to the network of pharmacies vaccinating Minnesotans across the state. Hy-Vee joins two other retail pharmacies in Minnesota: Thrifty White and Walmart. These pharmacies are participating in the Federal Retail Pharmacy Program that was launched in February 2021. Appointments at Hy-Vee will become available in the coming days. Locations and contact information for scheduling appointments will be accessible on the Vaccine Locator map here. The state will also notify seniors who are signed up for the Vaccine Connector (linked here) about this new opportunity for vaccination.

Missouri:

(St. Louis County): The St. Louis County Department of Public Health (“DPH”) issued its 4th Amended Quarantine and Isolation Order, which took effect at 6:00 a.m. on February 17, 2021, and will remain in effect until rescinded or amended. Under this amended Order:

  • People shall notify the health department if exposed to COVID-19;
  • People are required to self-isolate if they develop COVID-19 symptoms;
  • People shall quarantine if they came in close contact with a positive person, even if they have a negative result;
  • People who were vaccinated but are exposed to COVID-19 must also self-isolate unless:
    • It has been 14 days since the final dose of the vaccine;
    • Vaccination occurred within 3 months of the exposure; and
    • The person remained asymptomatic.
  • Individuals who were confirmed to have had COVID-19 are considered naturally immune and do not have to self-isolate if the exposure occurs within 90 days of contracting COVID-19;
  • People who have been tested, but did not come in close contact with a positive person, do not have to quarantine while awaiting test results;
  • If the DPH identifies a person as having had close contact with a positive person, the person is required to quarantine for 14 days or until cleared by the DPH; and
  • People who test positive for COVID-19 must remain in isolation until cleared in writing by DPH (which typically takes between 10 to 14 days).

(Kansas City): Kansas City Mayor Quinton Lucas issued the Thirteenth Amended Order 20-01, rescinding the Twelfth Amended Order 20-01, which took effect on February 19, 2021, and expires with the Fifth Amended Emergency Proclamation unless rescinded or amended. Under this Order:

  • Employers are required to reasonably accommodate employees with health or safety concerns or responsibility for minors or other persons by not requiring they report to work in certain situations.
  • Restaurants, taverns, and other venues must follow social distancing requirements.
  • Masks must be work in all indoor spaces when more than one person is in a room not separated by a barrier, unless exempted.
  • Gyms and fitness centers must follow social distancing requirements.
  • Businesses generally open to the public where social distancing cannot be maintained must maintain six feet of separation between areas of service.

(Platte County): Platte County recently issued an amended Order, which took effect on February 22, 2021, and will remain in effect until further notice. Under the Order, masks continue to be required in all indoor and outdoor locations, settings, and events where individuals are less than six feet away from each other. Additionally:

  • Masks must be worn in all indoor spaces when more than one person is in a room not separated by a barrier, unless exempted.
  • Restaurants, taverns, and other venues for food and drink must:
    • Ensure adequate distance between separate parties;
    • Require indoor and outdoor patrons be seated and wearing a mask unless actively eating or drinking; and
    • Limit parties to 10 or fewer persons.
  • Gyms and fitness centers must require all patrons to wear masks indoors and maintain social distancing.
  • Businesses generally open to the public must maintain six feet of distance between areas of service.

(Clay County): Clay County issued Public Health Emergency Order 02212021, which took effect at 5:00 p.m. on February 21, 2021, and will remain in effect until further notice. Under this Order, masks continue to be required for employees and visitors while indoors and unable to maintain social distancing. Additionally:

  • Restaurants, taverns, and other venues for food and drink, must:
    • Ensure adequate distance between separate parties; and
    • Require indoor and outdoor patrons be seated and wearing a mask unless actively eating or drinking.
  • Masks must be worn in all indoor spaces when more than one person is in a room not separated by a barrier, unless exempted.
  • Gyms and fitness centers must require all patrons to wear masks indoors and maintain social distancing.
  • Businesses generally open to the public must maintain six feet of distance between areas of service.

Nebraska:

On February 18, 2021, Governor Ricketts and DHHS Leaders provided Nebraska with an update on vaccine prioritization. Nebraska is currently in Phase 1B, meaning the majority of vaccines are currently being administered to Nebraskans who are 65 or older. After completion of Phase 1B, vaccines will be prioritized for those in the 50-64 age group.

New Jersey:

Governor Murphy signed Executive Order No. 225 increasing the capacity limits for large sports and entertainment venues and religious services. Effective immediately, collegiate sporting events can increase their capacity in compliance with the following:

  • Up to two parents or guardians per each participating athlete are allowed at indoor or outdoor practices and competitions.
  • The total number of individuals at an indoor practice or competition cannot exceed 35% of room capacity.
  • All outdoor events need to accommodate social distancing for all attendees.

Effective March 1, 2020, large sports and entertainment venues can increase capacity in compliance with the following:

  • Any venue with a capacity of more than 5,000 people can host 10% of their total capacity for indoor venues and 15% for outdoor venues.
  • The venue must ensure that all attendees remain six feet apart from other attendees, except for individuals who purchased or reserved tickets together.
  • All attendees will be required to wear masks within the venue, except when eating or drinking.

New York:

Governor Cuomo announced billiard halls statewide and movie theaters in New York City are now permitted to re-open. Further, weddings and catered events are scheduled to resume on March 15, 2020. Movie theaters are restricted to 25% capacity, with no more than 50 people per screen at a time, and masks are required. Billiard halls in New York City are restricted to 35% capacity, and those outside the City are restricted to 50% capacity. Regardless of billiard hall location, masks are required. Weddings and catered events are restricted to 50% capacity, with no more than 150 people per event, and masks are required. To see the full list of restrictions, visit here.

On February 21, 2021, Governor Cuomo announced the opening dates and scheduling information for the six community-based vaccination sites established through a partnership with the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA). On February 24, the sites in Brooklyn and Queens will begin vaccinations, and on March 3, sites in Buffalo, Rochester, Albany, and Yonkers will begin vaccinations. For more information about how to schedule your vaccine, visit here.

(New York City): On February 19, 2021, Governor Cuomo announced that New York City indoor dining can expand to 35% capacity beginning on February 26. On February 21, 2021, Mayor de Blasio signed Executive Order 183 extending the State of Emergency declaration in New York City.

Ohio:

On February 18, 2021, Governor DeWine announced that vaccine eligibility are available to Ohioans born with certain medical conditions or those who were diagnosed in early childhood whose conditions continued into adulthood. Additionally, Governor DeWine again asked vaccine providers to collect and report accurate and complete data on vaccine administrations, including race, ethnicity, age, and category of eligibility.

Oklahoma:

The Oklahoma State Department of Health announced 62 Oklahoma counties are in the “orange” risk level, 14 are in the “yellow” risk level (Cimarron, Harper, Woods, Alfalfa, Major, Woodward, Dewey, Beckham, Lowe, Pushmataha, Latimer, Logan, Okfuskee, and Craig counties), and one is in the “green” risk level (Roger Mills County), per the state’s COVID-19 Risk Level System. The risk level categorizations provide guidelines for individuals and businesses.

A county moves into the “orange” (moderate) risk level when it has more than 14.29 daily new cases per 100,000 people. In counties under the “orange” risk level:

  • Individuals must wear face coverings in public, limit out of state travel, and maintain physical distance of six feet apart.
  • Businesses should prioritize telework whenever possible.
  • High-contact businesses should operate under stricter public health protocols.
  • Dine-in service should operate under elevated cleaning and hygiene measures, as outlined by the CDC.

A county moves into the “yellow” (low) risk level when it has between 1.43 and 14.29 daily new cases per 100,000 people. In counties under the “yellow” risk level:

  • Individuals should wash their hands often for 20 seconds, maintain physical distance of six feet (and wear face coverings when physical distancing is difficult to maintain), and practice symptom checks before team sports competitions.
  • Large or public gatherings should operate with increased hygiene measures, physical distancing, and face coverings.
  • Businesses are encouraged to consider flexible work arrangements to enhance physical distancing, and face coverings should be work when physical distancing is not feasible.
  • Dine-in service should operate under elevated cleaning and hygiene measures, as outlined by the CDC.

A county moves into the “green” or “New Normal” risk phase when there are less than 1.43 daily new cases per 100,000 population. In counties under the “green” risk level:

  • Individuals should wash their hands often for 20 seconds, maintain physical distance of six feet apart, and wear face coverings when physical distancing is difficult to maintain.
  • Large or public gatherings should operate with increased hygiene measures, physical distancing, face coverings, and symptom monitoring.
  • Dine-in service should operate under elevated cleaning and hygiene measures as outlined by the CDC.
  • Employers should exercise discretion with returning to regularly scheduled, onsite work and should follow elevated hygiene guidelines and physical distancing.
  • High-risk individuals should telework if possible, limit physical interactions with other high-risk individuals, and limit visits to hospitals, nursing homes, or other residential care facilities.

Oklahoma will begin vaccinating the next high-risk priority groups in Phase 2 of the state’s distribution plan. This includes:

  • Oklahomans under 65 with comorbidities, including but not limited to: hypertension, obesity, cardiovascular disease, Down syndrome, diabetes mellitus, chronic lung, liver, or renal disease, cancers, and those who are at high risk of mortality and severe morbidity resulting from a COVID-19 infection; and
  • Teachers and staff in Pre-K-12 schools and educational settings.

Vaccine appointments are still available to those included in earlier priority groups, including healthcare workers, people 65 and over, and long-term care staff and residents.

Oregon:

Starting on February 22, 2021, Oregonians 70 or older are eligible to receive the vaccine. Oregon anticipates making vaccine appointments available to those 65 and older starting next week.

Pennsylvania:

As of February 17, 2021, 51 Pennsylvania counties are in the “substantial level” of the COVID-19 transmission rate. The State Department of Health is urging Pennsylvanians to download the COVID Alert PA app to aid in contact tracing efforts. Individuals under 19 and over 63 who test positive for COVID-19 may be contacted by one of the state’s more than 200 case investigators and asked to complete a Connect & Protect Form to open a digital case investigation. Thereafter, members of the state’s 325-person contact tracing team will begin the contact tracing process.

The Department of Health is notifying residents that weather conditions may result in delays to scheduled COVID-19 vaccination appointments. Acting Secretary of Health Alison Beam emphasized that the Department is working with vaccine providers and encouraging them to reach out to those registered for the vaccine in the near future to being rescheduling.

South Carolina:

Governor McMaster issued Executive Order 2021-10 on February 21, 2021, effective immediately. This Order continues the State of Emergency for 15 days (until March 8) and extends Executive Order 2020-73 for the duration of the State of Emergency. First responders and 911 operators are still allowed to ask individuals requesting assistance whether they have been exposed to COVID-19. All transportation waivers for commercial vehicles and operators of commercial vehicles are still in effect.

Vermont:

On February 22, 2021, the Vermont Department of Public Health announced a change in travel policy for individuals who have been fully vaccinated against COVID-19. According to the update, fully vaccinated people who travel to and from Vermont will no longer need to quarantine, effective Tuesday, February 23. To be considered fully vaccinated, travelers must have received the final dose at least two weeks before travel and must be prepared to present proof of vaccination, such as the federally issued card received during vaccination.

Washington:

On February 19, 2021, Governor Inslee signed into law a bill appropriating the $2.2 billion in federal funds distributed to Washington as part of the COVID-19 relief efforts. The law includes allocations of:

  • $714 million for K-12 schools;
  • $618 million for public health;
  • $365 million for eviction and rental assistance;
  • $240 million for business assistance grants;
  • $50 million for childcare;
  • $26 million for food banks and other food assistance programs; and
  • $91 million for income assistance.

Insurance Commissioner Kreidler extended two emergency orders on February 19, 2021. Those orders, which require health insurers to waive copays and deductibles for COVID-19 testing and protect consumers from surprise fees associated with COVID-19 testing, are now set to expire on March 21, 2021.

West Virginia:

On February 19, 2021, Governor Justice announced that in light of the recent decrease in COVID-19 cases and the increase in the number of vaccinated West Virginians, he has issued a series of executive orders to lessen the restrictions on some businesses, schools, and social gatherings. All affected establishments must still follow applicable safety guidelines, including but not limited to, mandatory face coverings and social distancing. The orders are as follows:

  • Executive Order 6-21 increases the maximum capacity limit for all restaurants and bars from 50 percent seating to 75 percent. Importantly, this change only applies if social distancing can be maintained. Bars may only increase capacity to the extent they have physical seating for every patron. This order went into effect February 20, 2021 at 12 a.m.
  • The Department of Health and Human Resources (DHHR) has amended its rules on capacity limits for small businesses, retail stores, and grocery stores. For small businesses and retail, capacity may increase from 2 people per 1,000 square feet to 4 people per 1,000 square feet. For grocery stores, capacity may increase from 3 people per 1,000 square feet to 6 people per 1,000 square feet.
  • Executive Order 6-21 raised the social gathering limit from 25 people to 75. The limit applies only for gatherings of people for purely social purposes. The limitation does not apply to any activity, business, or entity that has been deemed essential, such as religious services, weddings, conferences, or other special events held for essential businesses and operations, as defined by Executive Order 9-20 as amended.
  • Executive Order 7-21 states that all Pre-K-8 students statewide should be in school. Governor Justice has also called on the West Virginia Board of Education to make it mandatory that all counties send their students in those grades back to in-person instruction full-time.
  • Executive Order 5-21 clarified the existing prohibition on live indoor music performances. Live music performances, except for those incorporating vocals or using wind instruments, may take place indoors, as long as the event is held in accordance with all applicable safety guidelines. Live music incorporating vocals or using wind instruments may be performed indoors only for simulcast or other broadcast to remote audiences.

Wisconsin:

(Madison): On February 19, 2021, the Public Health Office of Madison & Dane County announced that a private/public collaborative is helping to ensure teachers and school staff across Dane County receive the COVID-19 vaccine in the coming weeks. Under this partnership, local health care providers and public health entities are seeking to vaccinate school staff at Dane County’s Alliant Energy center during the month of March. This effort is expected to take 6-8 weeks and will include weekends when teachers and staff are not in the classroom. School administrators will be providing information to their staff when spots become available; school staff does not need to take action at this time.

The Wisconsin Department of Health Services has indicated that school staff are eligible March 1, but this is dependent on vaccine supply. Additional groups are tentatively eligible for the vaccine beginning March 1, but school staff have priority within this group. Public Health Madison & Dane County is actively working on plans to vaccinate childcare providers on the same timeline as K-12 school staff.

February 18, 2021

Alabama:

In February 2021, State Health Officer Scott Harris encouraged Alabama residents without underlying health issues or who have very limited contact with others to delay vaccination to allow those who are higher risk to obtain the COVID-19 vaccine first (particularly because “the supply of COVID-19 vaccine is expected to remain limited in the months ahead”). Alabama’s Vaccine Allocation Plan is accessible here.

On February 18, 2021, The Alabama Department of Public Health announced that the highly transmissible COVID-19 B.1.1.7 variant (also known as the United Kingdom variant) has been identified in residents of Autauga, Jefferson, Madison, Mobile, and Montgomery counties. The state DPH is asking persons with recent taste or smell disorders or other COVID-19 symptoms who have tested negative for SARS-CoV-2 to “collect a specimen as soon as possible for submission to the ADPH Bureau of Clinical Laboratories.”

Alaska:

Alaska’s Department of Health and Social Services and Chief Medical Officer issued Health Advisories related to the COVID-19 response and recovery in the state. The advisories are not mandates but, rather, serve only as recommendations and guidance.

Health Advisory No. 1 (Recommendations for Keeping Alaskans Safe) encourages Alaskans to wear face coverings or masks, practice social distancing, self-monitor health and stay home if feeling unwell, and practice good hand hygiene. The Advisory also provides guidance on what to do if a person tests positive or have close contact with a confirmed case, as well as guidance regarding testing for COVID-19.

Health Advisory No. 2 addresses new protocols regarding travel into Alaska. Anyone entering Alaska from another state or country should:

  • Submit a travel declaration through the portal and arrive with proof of a qualifying negative COVID-19 test;
  • Follow the work plan that their employer filed with the State of Alaska; or
  • Receive a COVID-19 test upon arrival to Alaska and follow strict social distancing until receipt of test results. Travelers may get an optional second COVID-19 test within 5-14 days after arrival.

Health Advisory No. 3 concerns travel within Alaska and provides guidance to travelers located on the Road System and Alaska Marine Highway System and traveling to communities within those systems. The Advisory suggests that local communities should not prevent individuals from traveling for a “critical personal need” or for the conduct of an essential service/critical infrastructure related job. The Advisory also provides testing recommendations regarding travel to various communities within the state.

Health Advisory No. 4 provides guidance to critical infrastructure businesses operating within the state. If a business is considered to be a critical infrastructure business (according to federal CISA guidance) and has staff arriving from outside Alaska or traveling between communities off the Road System or the Alaska Marine Highway System, the business is strongly encouraged to submit a Community/Workforce Protective Plan to the Alaska COVID-19 Unified Command. The Advisory also provides guidance to specific industries (such as seafood processing workers, commercial fishing vessels, and commercial fishing harvesters) as to what should be included in their Protective Plans.

Colorado:

Governor Polis extended the Executive Order authorizing the Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment to Order Hospitals and Freestanding Emergency Departments to Transfer or Cease the Admission of Patients to Respond to the Current COVID-19 Disaster Emergency in Colorado. The Order allows hospitals that have reached capacity to stop admitting patients or transfer patients to a separate facility without first obtaining the individual’s written or informed consent (within the requirements of Federal law).

Connecticut:

As of February 11, 2021, Connecticut has entered phase 1b of its vaccination program, and residents over the age of 65 are able to schedule COVID-19 vaccination appointments. As of February 18, 29% of Connecticut’s 65-and-over population has been vaccinated. Residents can exercise several different options to schedule an appointment:

On February 18, 2021, Governor Ned Lamont held a news briefing to provide an update on COVID-19. To date, Connecticut has administered 504,129 first doses and 242,759 second doses of the COVID-19 vaccine. Governor Lamont further announced, alongside Mohegan Tribe and Yale New Haven Health, that a large-scale community vaccination site will be opening at Mohegan Sun’s Earth Expo & Convention Center as of February 19. The site will provide vaccinations by appointment only.

Currently, based on the Connecticut Department of Health’s weekly COVID-19 Alert Map, 138 of 169 municipalities are in the red zone alert level. Red indicates case rates over the last two weeks of greater than 15 per 100,000 population. Of the municipalities in non-red zones, alert levels are as follows:

  • Orange (between 10 to 14 cases per 100,000 population): Bethany, Canton, Deep River, Essex, Farmington, Goshen, Granby, Haddam, Hebron, Kent, Lebanon, New Hartford, Old Lyme, Portland, Sherman, Southbury, and Winchester.
  • Yellow (between 5 and 9 per 100,000 population): Pomfret, Redding, Salisbury, and Woodbury.
  • Gray (rates lower than five per 100,000 population): Barkhamsted, Bridgewater, Canaan, Cornwall, Eastford, Franklin, Hartland, Norfolk, Scotland, and Warren.

For the most up-to-date information on COVID-19 in the state, residents can subscribe to text message alerts by texting the keyword COVIDCT to 888-777.

District of Columbia:

On February 17, 2021, Mayor Bowser announced that beginning on Thursday, February 18, individuals who work in four categories will become eligible to book vaccination appointments through vaccinate.dc.gov or by calling the District’s COVID-19 Call Center:

  • individuals who work in a grocery store setting;
  • health and human services and social services outreach workers;
  • individuals who work in manufacturing; and
  • individuals who work in food packaging (for example, persons who work at Food & Friends and other similar facilities).

Delaware:

On February 16, 2021, FEMA and Delaware Officials announced a new COVID-19 vaccination center opening in Dover. The state partnered with the Dover International Speedway to create a drive-through COVID-19 second-dose vaccination site that will be open for a six-day period beginning on Sunday, February 21. To make an appointment for the Dover Speedway clinic, Delawareans must indicate the location and date of the DPH first dose event they attended from the following:

  • Dover Division of Motor Vehicles on January 16 through January 18
  • Salesianum School in Wilmington on January 18
  • Delaware City Division of Motor Vehicles on January 22 through 24
  • Georgetown Division of Motor Vehicles on January 23 and January 24

Vaccinations are set to occur between 9:00 a.m. and 7:00 p.m. each day and will be scheduled in 15-minute increments. The following are suggestions to help the Dover Speedway clinic run smoothly:

  • Do not arrive more than one hour early.
  • Enter via 1000 Leipsic Road, not the main entrance from Route 13.
  • Ensure your vehicle has a full tank of gas.
  • Bring personal identification (such as a driver’s licenses or photo ID).
  • Have proof of your first dose of the COVID-19 vaccination (vaccination card).
  • Be able to show confirmation of your appointment.

Florida:

(Miami-Dade County): On February 17, 2021, Mayor Daniella Cava issued an Executive Order further extending the state of local emergency for an additional seven-day period beginning on February 18, 2021.

Also on February 17, 2021, the Emergency Rental Assistance Program created through legislation proposed by Mayor Cava was approved by the Miami-Dade Board of County Commissioners. The program will provide $60 million in federal relief funds to support residential landlords and tenants.

Idaho:

The COVID-19 Vaccine Advisory Committee is meeting on Friday, February 19, 2021, at 2:00p.m. A full agenda of the event is accessible here. Public comment is currently being accepted via email to covid19vaccinepubliccomment@dhw.idaho.gov.

Kansas:

(Wyandotte County): On February 17, 2021, the Unified Government Public Health Department (UGPHD) announced that people who live in Wyandotte County and are over 65 years old are now eligible for COVID-19 vaccinations. The UGPHD is now scheduling vaccinations for those at highest risk, and highest priority will be given to seniors who live in zip codes 66101, 66102, and 66105. Zip code prioritization is based on the county’s COVID-19 Vulnerability Index, developed in partnership with Dr. Jason Glenn, Associate Professor with the Department of History and Philosophy of Medicine at the University of Kansas Medical Center. According to the UGPHD, the Index is meant to make vaccine distribution more equitable and prioritize vaccines for residents at higher risk of exposure and serious illness or death from COVID-19.

Seniors in Wyandotte County who want to be vaccinated must fill out the UGPHD’s Vaccine Interest Form, accessible online at ughealth.info/vaccine or by clicking on COVID-19 vaccines link at wycokck.org/COVID-19. The form is available in both English and Spanish. Those without an internet connection can call 311 for assistance in filling out the form. Once people have filled out the form, they will receive updates when they are eligible for a vaccine and information on how to make an appointment.

The UGPHD also announced a new mass vaccination facility is now open in Western Wyandotte County near the Legends, in addition to the central location at 78th and State Avenue. Both mass vaccination sites offer vaccines by appointment only.

  • West Vaccine Site Location
    • 10500 Parallel Parkway (former Best Buy facility)
    • Kansas City, KS 66109
  • Central Vaccine Site Location
    • 7836 State Ave (former Kmart facility)
    • Kansas City, KS 66112

Pending a final Memorandum of Agreement, an East location is tentatively set to open in March, and more information on that location will be coming soon.

Maine:

On February 17, 2021, Governor Mills signed a proclamation extending Maine’s state of civil emergency through March 18, 2021.

Maryland:

On February 17, 2021, Governor Hogan announced that a new variant of COVID-19, the P.1 or Brazil variant, has been identified in Maryland. The variant’s presence in Maryland was confirmed by the Maryland Department of Health in consultation with the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. The variant is believed to be more transmissible than the initial strain of the virus, but it is not currently known whether the P.1 variant causes more severe illness than other common variants. It is expected that currently available diagnostic tests will be able to detect the P.1 variant.

Massachusetts:

On February 16, 2021, Governor Baker announced a target outreach initiative to twenty Massachusetts cities that have been disproportionately impacted (based on the CDC’s Social Vulnerability Index) by COVID-19. These cities include: Boston, Brockton, Chelsea, Everett, Fall River, Fitchburg, Framingham, Haverhill, Holyoke, Lawrence, Leominster, Lowell, Lynn, Malden, Methuen, New Bedford, Randolph, Revere, Springfield, and Worcester.

As part of the initiative, $1 million will be allocated to the MA League of Community Health Centers to support vaccination in the states historically underserved communities. The Massachusetts department of public health will work directly with local leaders, community groups, and faith-based organizations to increase vaccine safety awareness and increase COVID-19 vaccination rates. Further, DPH is committed to helping the identified municipalities leverage state and local resources to create approaches tailored to the needs of the individual communities.

The main goals of the new initiative are as follows:

  • Increase vaccine confidence and knowledge among community engagement staff at health centers;
  • Implement dissemination of culturally relevant and linguistically diverse patient education materials; and
  • Identify and partner with local community-based organizations to provide information and tips to engage people in vaccination conversations.

Qualified health centers can apply for grants of up to $25,000 to “engage patients and community members in vaccination discussions to increase vaccine uptake in the Commonwealth’s hardest-hit communities.”

Governor Baker provided and update on COVID-19 on February 17, 2021.

Missouri:

As of February 9, 2021, per amendments to standing orders issued by the Missouri Director of the Department of Health and Senior Services, retired healthcare providers and healthcare providers licensed in other states are authorized to administer COVID-19 vaccinations in the state of Missouri.

Montana:

On February 16, 2021, Governor Gianforte announced that Missoula County has been selected to receive vaccines through the Federally Qualified Health Center (FQHC) COVID-19 vaccine program. Under this program, FQHCs will begin directly receiving vaccine supply the week of February 15.

Nebraska:

Nebraska is continuing its efforts to reach the local African American community to share information about COVID-19, as well as testing and vaccination options within the state. On February 18, 2021, Nebraska DHHS and the Lincoln-Lancaster County Health Department (LLCHD) attended a meeting of the NAACP’s Lincoln Branch to discuss the importance of obtaining a COVID-19 vaccine. Nebraska DHHS and LLCHD provided a space where African American Nebraskans can ask questions about the virus and available vaccines and obtain accurate information from qualified public health and medical officials.

Nevada:

On February 17, 2021, Governor Sisolak issued Emergency Directive 038, which lifts some restrictions applicable to schools and school-related activities, effective February 18 at 12:00 a.m.

Under the Directive, once a county school district, charter school, or private school has been open for in-person instruction for at least 20 days, it may

  • increase the occupancy of school buildings or facilities to the lesser of 250 students or 75% of maximum occupancy; and
  • adopt social distancing protocols with a minimum allowable distance of 3 feet between students and 6 feet between adults and students or other adults.

The Directive permits stricter social distancing standards to be implemented, but in no event shall less restrictive standards be adopted without approval from the Nevada Department of Education and the State’s Chief Medical Officer

Further, school transportation vehicles, including school buses, may now operate at 66% capacity, provided social distancing is maintained to the maximum extent practicable

County school district, charter school, and private school students must wear a face covering unless playing outdoors with social distancing of at least 6 feet, but they may remove their masks while playing an instrument that requires the use of their mouth (excluding singing). Schools wishing to host, organize, or conduct a gathering, event, performance, or other congregation of people in excess of 250 persons must submit a Large Gathering Plan to the local health authority, Nevada Department of Education, and the State Chief Medical Officer for approval.

Full-contact and close-contact sports may resume for competitions provided that competition hosts adopt a Preparedness and Safety Plan and spectators maintain social distancing and wear facial coverings. Full-contact and close-contact sports regulated by the NIAA must comply with guidance promulgated by the NIAA. In addition, the local county school district superintendent must approve commencement of full-contact and close-contact sports in writing to the Nevada Department of Education prior to the commencement of practice for said sports, and individual schools must implement NIAA testing and mitigation plans prior to full-contact and close-contact sports and sports competitions between separate schools. Plans must require minimum weekly testing of coaches, staff, and athletes participating and implement rules and guidance for the use of face coverings by student athletes while both actively and not actively participating in the sporting activity.

Ohio:

On February 18, 2021, Ohio's chief medical officer, Dr. Bruce Vanderhoff, stated that the new, more contagious form of COVID-19 has recently appeared across the state. The B.1.1.7 variant, also known as the United Kingdom variant, is perhaps the best-known mutation of the virus. The variant first appeared in the fall of 2020 and was detected in the United States in late December, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Late last month, researchers in Cleveland reported Ohio's first case.

"We know B.1.1.7.'s here," said Dr. Vanderhoff. "Exactly how much B.1.1.7. is either in Ohio or in the rest of the country is not clear, but the evidence would suggest that we're early in the B.1.1.7 growth." Dr. Vanderhoff further stated that he expects B.1.1.7 will become Ohio's "dominant variant by the time we get into late March and early April." Dr. Vanderhoff urged Ohioans to wear masks and maintain social distancing to reduce the spread of variants. Fortunately, both the Pfizer and Moderna COVID-19 vaccines are effective against this variant.

Additionally, due to severe weather, the CDC has notified NCDHHS that there may be delays in some shipments of COVID-19 vaccines this week. NCDHHS said it will continue working with the CDC and vaccine providers to help minimize the potential effects of these delays.

Utah:

On February 18, 2021, Governor Cox announced that individuals that are 65 years of age and older are now eligible for the COVID-19 vaccine. Individuals in this group may begin scheduling vaccination appointments as they become available. Additionally, the state is moving forward with the next phase of eligibility beginning on March 1. In the next phase, individuals with certain underlying medical conditions will be eligible for the vaccine. More information on vaccine eligibility can be found here.

Washington:

Washington announced that three additional commercial pharmacy chains – Walmart, Rite Aid, and Kroger - will begin vaccinating Washington residents starting Monday, February 22.

Wyoming:

On February 18, 2021, the Wyoming Department of Health announced that weather conditions across the nation are temporarily delaying shipments of the COVID-19 vaccine to the state. In light of the delays, WDH’s Community Health Section Chief has stated that individuals who are awaiting their second dose can receive the vaccine when it becomes available without needing to “start over.” Residents can continue view vaccine distribution details and complete pre-registration here.

February 17, 2021

California:

On February 17, 2021, Governor Newsom, Senate President pro Tempore Toni Atkins, and Assembly Speaker Anthony Rendon announced an agreement for an immediate action plan that will provide relief to individuals, families, and businesses economically impacted by the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic. The action plan will:

  • increase funding for small business grants of up to $25,000;
  • waive licensing fees for impacted businesses; and
  • allocate an additional $50 million to support cultural institutions.

Additionally, the plan partially conforms California tax law to reflect the new federal tax treatment for loans provided through the Paycheck Protection Plan (“PPP”). Under this modification, companies will be able to deduct up to $150,000 in expenses covered by the PPP loan. Under the plan, businesses that took out loans of $150,000 or less will be able to maximize their deduction for state purposes. In addition to aid for small businesses, the action plan will provide one-time relief payments of $600 to qualifying individuals, increase resources for critical childcare, and grant emergency relief to support community college students.

Florida:

The Florida Department of Health issued Emergency Rule 64JER21-1, F.A.C. permitting paramedics and emergency medical technicians (EMTs) in the state to administer COVID-19 vaccines in a non-emergency environment. Paramedics and EMTs must complete COVID-19 vaccine administration training prior to administering the vaccine. The Rule was adopted by the Department of State and effective as of February 16, 2021.

Kansas:

On February 16, 2021, Governor Laura Kelly and the Kansas Housing Resources Corporation announced $200 million in statewide rental assistance. The initiative, funded through the Coronavirus Response and Relief Supplemental Appropriations Act of 2021, provides the state of Kansas with $200 million to support housing stability and prevent evictions and homelessness.

Kansans struggling to cover rent and utility payments due to COVID-19 may qualify for up to 12 months of emergency assistance thanks to new federal relief. The Kansas Housing Resources Corporation (KHRC) and the City of Wichita will administer the funds. Tenants may qualify for assistance if they earn no more than 80 percent of their area’s median income, are experiencing documented financial hardship as a result of the COVID-19 pandemic, and may be at risk of housing instability or homelessness without assistance.

Wichita residents may apply through the Wichita Emergency Rental Assistance Program (WERAP) administered by the city’s Housing and Community Services division. The city’s online application will open on Monday, February 22, 2021. Kansans living outside the Wichita city limits may apply through the Kansas Emergency Rental Assistance (KERA) program administered by KHRC. The online KERA application will open on Monday, March 15, 2021.

Minnesota:

On February 18, 2021, Governor Tim Walz announced the launch of the Minnesota COVID-19 Vaccine Connector, a tool that helps all Minnesotans find out when, where, and how to get their COVID-19 vaccine. The state has mobilized health care systems, local pharmacies, federally qualified health centers, local hospitals, local public health facilities, and state-run community vaccination sites to make sure everyone will be able to get a vaccine when the federal government ships more doses. The Vaccine Connector will help connect Minnesotans to that network once it’s their turn to get a shot and will also improve the ability of communities of color to access the vaccine. Demand for vaccine still far exceeds supply, and Minnesotans should remain patient as more vaccine doses arrive in the weeks and months ahead.

Minnesotans who have not yet been vaccinated are encouraged to sign up for the COVID-19 Vaccine Connector, regardless of their current vaccine eligibility status. There will be no cost and no restricted time period for signing up. Minnesotans can sign up at mn.gov/vaccineconnector or call 833-431-2053 for assistance (including translation services) with signing up over the phone.

New Jersey:

Governor Murphy signed Executive Order No. 222, which extends the Public Health Emergency for thirty days. Executive Order No. 222 also extends all Executive Orders issued under the Governor’s authority under the Emergency Powers Act.

New York:

Governor Cuomo announced that an additional 13 community-based pop-up vaccination sites are coming online this week at community centers, public housing complexes, and cultural centers. Similar to other pop-up sites, these sites will be re-established in three weeks to administer second doses of the vaccine.

Governor Cuomo announced the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) will establish four additional community-based mass vaccination sites in Buffalo, Rochester, Albany, and Yonkers. The vaccination appointments will initially be reserved for members of the communities in which the sites are located.

Governor Cuomo announced that indoor family entertainment centers and places of amusement can reopen with 25% capacity beginning on Friday, March 26. Additionally, outdoor amusement parks can open with 33% capacity on April 9. In order to reopen, the facilities must submit reopening plans to their respective health department. The Governor also announced certain guidelines for all re-openings.

(New York City): Mayor de Blasio announced that the opening of some of the City’s vaccination sites will be delayed due to a vaccine supply shortage and shipment delays due to the winter storms.

North Dakota:

Next week, on February 24, 2021, the State Health Council, which is the advisory body of the NDDoH, is holding an online meeting at 8:30 a.m. The meeting will include discussions on a variety of topics, some of which are related to COVID-19:

  • State laboratory testing update;
  • Disease Control and Forensic Pathology update; and
  • State Health Officer update.

The meeting will be accessible here.

Utah:

On February 16, 2021, Utah announced that it will begin COVID-19 contact tracing through smart phone applications to help slow the spread of COVID-19. Beginning on February 17, Utah residents will be able participate in the contact tracing efforts by opting in to COVID exposure notifications via smartphone devices. The state has explained that the electronic tracing does not store any personal data, and citizens must opt in to participate. Full information about the new contact tracing efforts can be found here.

Virginia:

On February 17, 2021, Governor Ralph Northam announced that Virginia has launched a centralized system where residents can pre-register for the COVID-19 vaccine online or by telephone at 877-VAX-IN-VA. The call center operates seven days a week from 8:00 a.m. to 8:00 p.m. and is staffed by 750 operators, including Spanish-speaking agents, who can answer questions about the COVID-19 vaccine and help with pre-registration.

In addition to completing pre-registration, Virginians can confirm they are on the wait list and learn more about the state’s vaccination program. Virginians who have already pre-registered through their local health departments will be automatically transferred to the centralized system, and their pre-registration status will not be affected.

To complete pre-registration online or by telephone, residents are asked to provide basic information to determine eligibility. Pre-registrants will not be asked to provide their social security number or immigration status. Anyone who pre-registers will receive a pre-registration confirmation and a reference code that can be used to verify one’s status.

Virginians who qualify for Groups 1A and 1B are currently eligible for vaccinations. This includes health care personnel, residents and staff of long-term care facilities, people age 65 and older, frontline essential workers, those living and working in homeless shelters and correctional facilities, and individuals with underlying medical conditions or disabilities that increase their risk of severe illness from COVID-19.

Governor Northam emphasized that vaccine supply is still limited, but that the government is striving to acquire more doses and administer the vaccine in a safe, efficient, and equitable manner.

Washington:

The Washington Department of Health (DOH) is expanding its voluntary school testing initiative, whereby the DOH works in conjunction with school districts to tailor testing programs for each district. Joining the program provides a school district with a dedicated testing strategy planner and an array of testing options.

February 16, 2021

Alaska:

(Anchorage): The City of Anchorage remains under emergency regulations related to COVID-19. Acting Mayor Quinn-Davidson issued Emergency Order EO-18, which will remain in effect until revoked or rescinded. The Order requires the following:

  • Everyone in Anchorage must limit outings and physical contact with those outside of their household.
  • All individuals must wear face masks and maintain six feet of distance between household groups at all gatherings.
    • Indoor gatherings involving consumption of food or drink are limited to 10 people, and gatherings without food and drink are limited to 15 people.
    • Outdoor gatherings involving consumption of food and drink are limited to 30 people, and gatherings without food and drink are limited to 50 people.
  • Restaurants, bars, breweries, nightclubs, and similar entities may operate at up to 50% occupancy. All businesses must stop selling alcohol at midnight.
  • Indoor entertainment facilities (bingo halls, theaters, bowling alleys, etc.) are limited to 50% occupancy.
  • Organized sports may conduct competitions with teams from within Anchorage but may not conduct competitions with teams from outside Anchorage.
  • Indoor gyms, recreation centers, and fitness centers are limited to 50% of maximum capacity. Indoor classes are limited to 15 people, and face coverings are required at all times.
  • Salons and personal care service providers are limited to 50% occupancy and may not provide services that require the removal of a face mask.
  • Retail stores and other public-facing businesses are limited to 50% occupancy and must operate in a manner that ensures six feet of physical distancing.
  • Any establishment serving the public in a “sit-down setting” or for an in-person appointment or service lasting longer than 15 minutes shall require all customers/clients to sign in with legible contact information to assist with contact tracing efforts.

(Juneau): The City and Bureau of Juneau currently has restrictions in place to reduce the spread of COVID-19. Face masks are required in all indoor public areas, indoor gatherings are limited to 50 people, and people are required to maintain six feet of physical distance from one another. Personal service business may operate by appointment only, and waiting areas are not permitted. Restaurants, bars, and fitness centers may operate at 50% of maximum capacity.

Arizona:

Governor Ducey issued Executive Order 2021-03, which requires the Arizona State Board of Education to utilize AZ Merit assessment data and other assessment or academic data for this school year to compare it to prior years and identify the extent of learning loss that has occurred. An emphasis should be placed on understanding how the data impacts students of various demographic subgroups, and the findings (along with any recommendations for evidence-bases strategies to mitigate the impact of learning loss) should be reported to the Governor’s Office by November 1, 2021. Governor Ducey explained the Order will act in conjunction with House Bill 2402, which provides flexibility around the A-F letter grading system.

Delaware:

On February 12, 2021, Governor Carney, the Delaware Division of Public Health (DPH), and the Delaware Emergency Management Agency (DEMA) announced a list of community testing sites throughout Delaware for the week of February 15th. Testing locations include pop-up and Curative trailer sites, in addition to Walgreens facilities and various hospital and health care locations.

On February 16, 2021, the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA), the Centers for Disease Control (CDC), Health and Human Services (HHS), Delaware Emergency Management Agency (DEMA), Delaware Division of Public Health (DPH), and Dover International Speedway (DIS) announced a partnership to open a drive-thru COVID-19 vaccination site for six days beginning Saturday, February 20, 2021. Delaware requested federal assistance to establish the vaccination site, which will provide the second dose of the COVID-19 vaccine to up to 3,000 Delawareans a day for six days. These second-dose appointments will only be available to those who received a first dose from the Division of Public Health at certain locations in the state. Both the Moderna and Pfizer vaccines will be offered. Appointments for the vaccination clinic will open on Wednesday at 11 a.m., and residents can register at here.

Florida:

(Broward County): On February 12, 2021, County Administrator Bertha Henry issued a Declaration of Emergency further extending the local state of emergency for 7 days, starting at 9:00 a.m. on February 16, 2021.

Illinois:

(Chicago): Chicago Mayor Lori Lightfoot announced the City has moved into Phase IV of its Reopening Chicago plan. This phase expands indoor dining in the City of Chicago. Bars and restaurants can now reopen indoors at the lesser of 40% capacity or 50 people. Other notable restrictions of this phase include:

  • In PK-12 schools, gatherings of students and staff are limited to no more than 50 individuals indoors or 100 individuals outdoors with social distancing;
  • Childcare group sizes are limited to 17 children;
  • Higher education classrooms must observe social distancing, and capacity is limited to 40% with a cap of 50 individuals;
  • Indoor group exercises or fitness classes are allowed;
  • Out of school and enrichment programs in which participants are primarily seated/stationary may continue in groups of up to 15;
  • All employees in office settings who can work remotely are encouraged to do so, and capacity is limited to 40% for all indoor spaces where remote work is not possible;
  • Indoor gatherings in private residences cannot exceed 10 individuals;
  • Social events and meetings are limited to 40% capacity with no more than 50 guests, both indoors and outdoors;
  • Hotels must limit gatherings in common spaces to 40% capacity, with no more than 50 individuals in the same area at any time;
  • Restaurants and bars must make food available at all times in order to offer indoor service;
  • Table size in bars and restaurants is limited to no more than six people indoors and outdoors with tables spaced 6 feet apart (and bar seating is allowed with 6 feet between parties);
  • Retail stores must limit capacity to 40%, but grocery stores and pharmacies may continue to operate at up to 50% capacity;
  • Health and fitness centers must limit indoor use to a maximum of 40% capacity, and indoor fitness classes are limited to 15 individuals; and
  • Manufacturing, construction, transportation and warehousing all must limit gatherings of employees in common areas to no more than 50 people while maintaining 6 feet of distance.

Maryland:

On February 15, 2021, Governor Hogan signed the bipartisan RELIEF Act of 2021, which delivers more than $1 billion in tax relief and economic stimulus for struggling families and small businesses suffering from the effects of the COVID-19 pandemic. As a result of this legislation, certain unemployed Marylanders will not have to pay state and local income taxes on their unemployment benefits. In addition, the legislation provides tax relief and protections for small businesses against sudden or substantial increases in unemployment taxes. The legislation also provides for direct relief checks that will go out to hundreds of thousands of Marylanders in need.

On February 16, 2021, Governor Hogan submitted a $1.59 billion supplemental budget for Fiscal Year 2022, including additional resources to support the safe reopening of schools. Some highlights of the supplemental budget include:

  • $931 million in funding for local school systems in support and targeted assistance for the safe reopening of public schools;
  • $434 million in additional funding for the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) and the Pandemic EBT program; and
  • $128 million to support the state’s Child Care Scholarship program, including almost $60 million to help support licensed childcare providers recover from the impact of the pandemic.

Minnesota:

On February 12, 2021, Governor Walz announced adjustments to COVID-19 mitigation measures as Minnesota makes progress on vaccinations. These measures are enacted in Executive Order 21-07, which takes effect on Saturday, February 13 at noon, and is intended to further “reopen” Minnesota’s economy and include:

  • Increasing the “not to exceed” capacity in restaurants to 250, while leaving the maximum capacity at 50 percent;
  • Increasing indoor entertainment “not to exceed” capacity to 250, while leaving the maximum capacity at 25 percent;
  • Increasing private event and celebration “not to exceed” capacity to 50, while leaving the maximum capacity at 25 percent;
  • Increasing gym and pool “not to exceed” capacity to 250, while leaving maximum capacity at 25 percent and reducing distancing requirement to 6 feet; and
  • Allowing restaurants to stay open until 11:00 p.m.

New Jersey:

Governor Murphy announced the launch of a community-based vaccination partnership to provide access to the COVID-19 vaccine in underserved communities. The initial phase will include sites in Somerset, Trenton, Elizabeth, Vineland, and Patterson. The goal of this partnership is to vaccinate 15,000 residents by the end of March. These sites will vaccinate only the members of the immediate communities, and appointments will be required.

New York:

On February 13, 2021, Governor Cuomo announced that New Yorkers with comorbidities and underlying conditions can use the “Am I Eligible” website starting on February 14. People can use the following methods to verify they are eligible for the vaccine:

  • doctor’s letter;
  • medical information evidencing comorbidity; or
  • a signed certification.

Governor Cuomo signed Executive Order 202.94 extending closing times for bars, restaurants, gyms and fitness centers, casinos, billiard halls, as well as other State Liquor Authority-licensed establishments from 10:00 p.m. to 11:00 p.m. throughout the state.

(New York City): On February 12, 2021, Mayor de Blasio announced a plan to vaccinate homebound seniors and essential frontline home care workers who care for these seniors. New York City will provide on-site senior vaccination clinics and will host a vaccination drive for homebound seniors once the Johnson & Johnson vaccine is approved.

On February 16, 2021, Mayor de Blasio signed Executive Order 182 extending the State of Emergency declaration in New York City.

Rhode Island:

Governor Raimondo issued Executive Order 21-14 on February 16, 2021, and extended the following executive orders through March 17, 2021:

  • Executive Order 20-02 (Declaration of Disaster Emergency): Restricting persons and corporations from increasing prices of personal protective equipment.
  • Executive Order 20-29 (Twenty-Sixth Supplemental Emergency Declaration - Promoting Better Coordination of Health Care Coverage): Providing health care entities and facilities further flexibility to sustain adequate and responsive networks.
  • Executive Order 20-39 (Thirty-Sixth Supplemental Emergency Declaration - Authorizing adjustments to Child Care Subsidies and Reimbursement Rates): Enabling the Rhode Island Department of Human Services to create emergency regulations that contain temporary rates for reimbursing childcare providers during the COVID-19 emergency.

Tennessee:

Starting February 22, 2021, people who are over 65 and teachers of all ages will be eligible to receive the COVID-19 vaccination. Other developments in Tennessee’s vaccination plan include:

  • Sign language interpreters who work in healthcare have been moved to phase 1a2;
  • Air traffic control and air cargo workers have been moved up to phase 1b;
  • Pregnant women have been moved up to phase 1c; and
  • overnight camp staff have been moved up to phase 3.

The State has provided county-by-county information regarding the vaccine and how to make an appointment.

Virginia:

On February 16, 2021, Governor Ralph Northam announced $524 million in new federal funding to help Virginia families stay in their homes amid the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic. The Virginia Rent Relief Program (RRP) is funded through the Emergency Rental Assistance (ERA) program included in the recent federal stimulus package. The RRP assists households and landlords with rent payments to prevent evictions. Virginia has put $160 million into the RRP to increase housing stability across the state and will make additional funding available based upon need. The program will be administered by the Department of Housing and Community Development.

The new ERA funding does not include mortgage relief, so the Rent Mortgage Relief Program (RMRP) that has been operating since June 2020 will no longer accept applications for assistance with mortgage payments.

Chesterfield and Fairfax counties will operate their own ERA-funded rent relief programs for their residents. Virginia residents outside those counties are encouraged to reach out to their landlords to determine the quickest path to rental assistance. Virginia law requires landlords to work with their tenants to apply for this assistance, but landlords can initiate applications here. Tenants interested in applying for assistance can check their eligibility by completing a self-assessment. Tenants may be eligible for rent arrears payments back to April 1, 2020 and up to three months of payments into the future. Total payments may not exceed 15 months of rental assistance per household.

Washington:

After receiving updated data from a Walla Walla hospital, Washington moved the South Central Region to Phase 2 of the Washington Roadmap to Recovery reopening plan. With this change, all regions of Washington are currently in Phase 2, the more lenient phase of the plan.

Wyoming:

On February 11, 2021, Wyoming’s State Health Officer Alexia Harrist issued public health orders addressing statewide business operations and statewide gatherings. The orders are effective through February 28, 2021. The health order continues to require that face coverings be worn in various settings, including businesses, state buildings, and healthcare facilities. Additionally, the requirement covers individuals waiting for or riding public transportation, including ride share services and the drivers of these services.

Previous orders addressing restaurants, schools, gymnasiums, personal service businesses, and statewide gatherings are also now set expire on February 28, 2021 but have been updated:

  • The one person per 120 square feet restriction has been removed for gyms and swimming pools.
  • The allowable group size in certain businesses has increased from 6 to 8 individuals.
  • Gatherings are now allowed to be up to 25 people.
  • The maximum number of people allowed at certain indoor events is now 500.
  • The maximum number of people allowed at certain outdoor events is now 1,000.

February 15, 2021

Alaska:

On February 14, 2021, Governor Dunleavy’s COVID-19 disaster emergency declaration, which was most recently extended on December 15, formally expired. Governor Dunleavy does not intend to extend the Declaration again, and the legislature has not yet adopted its own disaster declaration. In the absence of such declaration, Governor Dunleavy announced that his administration would manage the rollout and distribution of the vaccine. The Governor also issued a directive to all commissioners and state employees to continue following all policies regarding COVID-19 that were in place under the disaster declaration.

Because all Health Outbreak Orders were only to remain in effect for the duration of the Public Health Disaster Emergency Declaration, Health Break Orders 1-8 are no longer in effect. Additionally, the Alaska Department of Health and Social Services and Alaska’s Chief Medical Officer issued Health Advisory No. 2, which addresses new protocols regarding travel into Alaska.

Anyone entering Alaska from another state or country should:

  • Submit a travel declaration through the portal and arrive with proof of a qualifying negative COVID-19 test;
  • Follow the work plan that their employer filed with the State of Alaska; or
  • Receive a COVID-19 test upon arrival to Alaska and follow strict social distancing until results arrive.
  • Travelers may get an optional second COVID-19 test within 5-14 days after arrival.

Arizona:

Governor Ducey issued Executive Order 2021-02, which prohibits state agencies (as defined in the Order) from conducting any regular, expedited, emergency or exempt rulemaking, whether formal or informal, without receiving prior written approval from the Governor’s office. To receive written final approval from the Governor’s Office, a state agency seeking to conduct rule making must address one or more justifications on a 10-item list and may not submit the proposed rules to the Governor’s Regulatory Review Council after the public comment period and close of the rulemaking record. For each additional rule a state agency requests, they must recommend at least three existing rules to eliminate. State agencies must conduct a comprehensive review of any rules suspended during the COVID-19 Public Health State of Emergency to determine if they should be permanently suspended and must report their findings by June 1, 2021.

State agencies may not publicize any directives, policy statements, documents, or forms on its website unless explicitly authorized by the Arizona Revised Statutes or Administrative Code. Any material not specifically authorized must be immediately removed. The order further requires state agencies that issue occupational and professional licenses to post, on their website landing page, all current state policies that ease licensing burdens and the exact steps applicants must complete to obtain a license using the policies. A designated area on the landing page must be dedicated to licensing information specifically for military spouses, active duty service members and veterans, and all policies making it easier for those applicant groups to receive their licenses. State agencies issuing occupational or professional licenses must track the veteran and military spouse statuses of its applicants immediately and report the information to the Governor’s office on an annual basis, beginning July 1, 2021.

Colorado:

On February 13, 2021, Governor Polis extended an Executive Order directing the Colorado Department of Regulatory Agencies to promulgate a rule establishing reasonable rates by which health insurance carriers will reimburse providers for the cost of the COVID-19 vaccine. The following day, Governor Polis extended an Executive Order suspending certain regulatory statutes, permitting the following:

  • Retailers and breweries that sell alcohol on site can provide takeout of sealed alcoholic beverages if the customer is over 21 and also purchases food.
  • A suspension of the requirement for a physical exam prior to the issuance of medical marijuana cards.
  • Retail marijuana stores can now offer pickup of certain marijuana products.
  • Delivery of emergency goods and services despite the vehicle gross weight provisions for vehicles weighing between 80,001 – 84,999 pounds.

Governor Polis also extended an Executive Order that suspended statutes preventing the county clerk and recorder from issuing marriage licenses when such offices are closed to the public.

On February 15, 2021, Governor Polis extended the Executive Order declaring a disaster emergency due to COVID-19.

District of Columbia:

On February 12, 2021, Mayor Bowser announced a second round of citywide PPE care packages to support local businesses. Through this second round of PPE care packages, the Bowser Administration is investing an additional $1.7 million of essential supplies to local businesses. Local businesses must complete the PPE Sign-Up Form to receive the PPE care packages. For more information, visit coronavirus.dc.gov/phasetwo.

Florida:

(Palm Beach County): On February 11, 2021, Mayor Kerner issued a Declaration of Continuing Emergency, further extending the state of local emergency through February 19, 2021.

Georgia:

On February 15, 2021, Governor Kemp signed Executive Order 02.15.21.01 which provides additional guidance for “Empowering A Healthy Georgia.” The Order extends through February 28, 2021 and maintains previous guidelines from EO 12.08.20.01. and EO 11.30.20.02, including social distancing guidelines, the ban on gatherings of more than 50 people unless individuals remain six feet apart, and permission for pharmacists and nurses to administer COVID-19 vaccinations when the vaccine becomes available.

Hawaii:

Governor Ige recently issued the Eighteenth Proclamation related to the COVID-19 emergency, requiring all persons entering the state to self-quarantine for 10 days (with some exceptions), including those who have previously tested positive for COVID-19 but are no longer at risk of infecting others. Individuals are also required to wear a face covering over their nose and mouth when in public. The Proclamation extends the disaster emergency relief period through April 13, 2021, unless terminated or superseded by a separate proclamation.

(Honolulu City and County): On February 9, 2021, Mayor Blangiardi signed an Eleventh Proclamation of Emergency that declared a state of emergency period relating to the COVID-19 pandemic and will remain in place for 60 days, unless terminated earlier pursuant to Hawaii law. Mayor Blangiardi also issued Emergency Order 2021-01, amending and restating the Order implementing the prior Tier 2 order, which is substantially the same as the previous Order. The Emergency Order takes effect on February 15, 2021 and will continue through March 15, 2021 unless movement to another tier is required by Honolulu’s COVID-19 Reopening Framework.

(Hawaii County): Mayor Roth issued Emergency Rule No. 14 (Extension), which extends Emergency Rule No. 14 until April 12, 2021. Mayor Roth also issued a Sixth Supplementary Emergency Proclamation further extending the local state of emergency through April 12, 2021.

Maine:

On February 12, 2021, Governor Mills issued an Order amending indoor gathering limits. Under the new Order, houses of worship may now accommodate five people per 1,000 square feet of space, or up to 50 people, whichever is greater. Previously, the limit for houses of worship was set at a maximum of 50 people.

Maryland:

On February 11, 2021, Governor Hogan announced that the Maryland Department of Health (MDH) and the Maryland State Department of Education (MSDE) launched a program to provide up to 1 million COVID-19 tests for both public and non-public schools. This will serve as an additional tool to support schools that are open, or plan to reopen, for in-person learning for the remainder of the 2020-2021 school year. The state will provide both rapid antigen point-of-care and diagnostic testing supplies proportional to the number of students and staff returning for in-person learning, based on the anticipated number of students and staff that may need testing, using guidance from state health officials.

In the same announcement, Governor Hogan stated that the Maryland Department of Health will issue orders to allow limited visitation to resume at Maryland hospitals and nursing homes. Each hospital will set its own visitation policies, which must be in compliance with CDC guidelines. Indoor visitation at nursing homes will resume as early as March 1, provided facilities do not have active cases and follow proper testing protocols.

On February 12, 2021, Governor Hogan announced that licensed child care centers and registered family child care providers are eligible to apply for Child Care Pandemic Relief Fund grants to help meet increased operation costs. This funding is related to federal funding received through the Coronavirus Response and Relief Supplemental Appropriations Act of 2021 to support childcare for children and families. Using the funding, the Maryland State Department of Education (MSDE) is establishing a $60 million grant program to help eligible childcare programs throughout the state meet operating costs and address lost revenue.

Michigan:

The Michigan Department of Health and Human Services (“MDHHS”) announced several updates to the state’s COVID-19 vaccine strategy. The changes include:

  • Mortuary service workers who routinely work with infectious materials will be able to be vaccinated as part of group 1A;
  • Certain providers will be allowed to vaccinate residents age 60 and up (although some facilities will still only be able to vaccinate adults age 65 and up); and
  • Workers in the food processing and agriculture settings will be able to get vaccinated as of March 1.

MDHHS also announced that 41 federally qualified health centers in medically underserved areas across the state will act as new vaccination locations and will soon start receiving doses of the vaccine to help vaccinate residents 65 and older.

Minnesota:

On February 12, 2021, Governor Walz announced the COVID-19 Peacetime Emergency is extended through March 15, 2021 until rescinded by the proper authority or terminated by a majority vote of each house of the legislature.

Montana:

On February 12, 2021, Governor Gianforte issued a new Directive Implementing Executive Order 2-2021. The new Directive lifts the state’s mask mandate and ends Montana’s phased approach to reopening. Under the Directive, counties can still pass their own health orders requiring residents to wear masks, which many counties already have in place (e.g., Lewis and Clark, Gallatin, Butte-Silver Bow, and Missoula counties).

Nebraska:

Numerous COVID-19 testing sites are closed this week due to severe winter weather (wind chills throughout the state are expected to fall below -25 degrees). As of February 12, 2021, all local health departments have entered Phase 1B of the state’s vaccination plan. Governor Ricketts has directed health departments to administer at least 90% of their respective vaccine allocations to Nebraskans age 65+.

Nevada:

On February 14, 2021, Governor Sisolak issued Emergency Directive 037, which lays out a progressive timeline for lifting COVID-19 related restrictions in effect under previous Emergency Directives. Restrictions will be relaxed on February 15 and March 15. On May 1, Nevada will begin transitioning regulatory authority to local authorities (though statewide face covering and social distancing mandates will remain in place).

Effective February 15, 2021 at 12:00 a.m.:

  • Houses of worship may conduct in person services, but occupancy shall not exceed 50%, seating must be arranged to ensure a minimum of 6 feet of separation between congregants who do not reside in the same household, and participants (including leaders and staff) must wear face coverings.
  • Public gatherings are restricted to the lesser of 100 persons or 35% capacity.
  • Indoor private social gatherings are restricted to 10 or fewer persons, and outdoor private gatherings are restricted to 25 or fewer person, provided that all persons wear face coverings, even when social distancing is observed (excludes gatherings of persons who all live in the same household, persons experiencing homelessness, or organizations providing shelter for persons experience homelessness).
  • Arcades, racetracks, bowling alleys, miniature golf courses, pools halls, amusement and theme parks, and similar activities may allow access to the public so long as the occupancy does not exceed 35%. Food and drinks should be contained to areas designated as restaurants/food courts.
  • Libraries, museums, art galleries, aquariums, and zoos may allow access to the public so long as occupancy does not exceed 50%, all social distancing requirements are satisfied, and all interactive and/or hands-on exhibits remain closed. Food and drinks should be contained to areas designated as restaurants/food courts.
  • Gaming properties shall limit occupancy in gaming areas to no more than 35%.
  • Body art and piercing facilities may reopen to the public so long as:
    • a minimum of 6 feet of separation between customers is maintained if no walls or partitions exist between stations;
    • no more than one customer or client may be seated at any given station;
    • no walk-in customers are accepted;
    • customers waiting for appointments must wait outside the facility and maintain social distancing;
    • artists, employees, and customers wear face coverings at all times;
    • body art and piercings that require mask removal (such as work around the nose and mouth) are prohibited;
    • guests are not permitted to accompany customers; and
    • the establishment complies with all of guidelines promulgated by the Nevada Occupational Safety & Health Administration.
  • Retail stores, including grocery stores, may offer limited self-service food and drinks with mitigation measures in place.
  • A person wishing to host, organize, or conduct a gathering, event, performance, or other congregation of people in a space with fixed seating capacity of 2,500 or more may submit a Large Gathering Venue COVID-19 Preparedness & Safety Plan (“Large Gathering Plan”) to the applicable state and local authorities for events occurring on March 1, 2021 or later. Plans for events at facilities regulated by the Gaming Control Board (“GCB”) must be approved by GCB prior to the event. Plans for events regulated by the Nevada State Athletic Commission (“NSAC”) must be submitted to and approved by NSAC prior to the event. Plans for all other events at venues with fixed seating capacity of 2,500 or greater must be submitted to and approved by the Nevada Department of Business and Industry prior to the event.
    • Large gatherings may not exceed 20% of fixed seating capacity;
    • All attendees must be assigned seats (standing room only not permitted);
    • Venues must clearly delineate discrete sections that are at least 6 feet apart and isolated from one another (including through use of separate entrances/exits and facilities);
      • Event staff shall not provide service to more than 1 section.
      • Social distancing must be maintained among different parties.
      • No more than 6 persons may be seated in a single party.
  • A person wishing to host, organize, or conduct a large gathering in an area without fixed seating in excess of 250 attendees but no more than 1,000 attendees may submit a Large Gathering Plan to the applicable state and local authorities for events occurring on March 15, 2021 or later.
  • Restaurants, food establishments, breweries, distilleries, and wineries may utilize tables and serve patrons within the bar area so long as:
    • The maximum occupancy for indoor dining does not exceed 35%;
    • Customers are seated a minimum of 6 feet from customers not in the same party;
    • Parties larger than 6 may not be seated together;
    • All standing and open congregation areas that are not necessary for the preparation and service of food or beverages shall be closed;
    • Customers shall only be served via table service and may not order from the bar area;
    • Bar top seating is permitted only if barstools are placed at least 6 feet from other barstools of customers not in the same party;
    • Customers waiting to dine at the establishment are required to wait outside and practice social distancing while waiting;
    • Patrons are required to wear face coverings except while actively eating or drinking; and
    • buffets shall remain closed.
  • Gyms, fitness facilities, and fitness studios may allow access to the public so long as:
    • Occupancy does not exceed 35%;
    • Employees, trainers, instructors, and patrons wear face coverings at all times;
    • The number of patrons is limited in order to maintain social distancing;
    • The placement of equipment allows at least 6 feet of separation between patrons;
    • Group classes are limited to maintain at least 6 feet of separation between participants;
    • Contact sports are permitted only to the extent 6 feet of separation can be maintained between participants, and participants are not permitted to physically contact other participants;
    • Locker rooms are limited to 50% capacity;
    • Communal showers, steam rooms, saunas, hot tubs, and other communal facilities remain closed;
    • Pools may reopen subject to restrictions contained in Section 29 of Emergency Directive 021; and
    • Childcare facilities operate in compliance with all applicable regulations and protocols.

Detailed information regarding the restrictions applicable to each type of establishment can be found in Nevada’s updated Roadmap to Recovery and Nevada’s Guidance for Safe Gatherings. The foregoing restrictions shall remain in effect until terminated by a subsequent Directive and restrictions not revised by this Directive remain in effect.

New Hampshire:

On February 12, 2021, the Governor issued Executive Order 2021-02, which renewed the Declaration of a State of Emergency and extended the State of Emergency declared in Executive Order 2020-04 for a period of 21 days.

New Mexico:

On February 13, 2021, the state explained that the current COVID-19 restrictions on lodging capacity are not in effect during times of extreme weather and road closures. Additionally, although the COVID-19 restrictions are suspended during these events, citizens must still adhere to occupancy limits that are set by local fire marshals. All other COVID-19 restrictions remain in place.

Ohio:

On February 11, 2021, Governor DeWine announced that Ohio Department of Health Director Stephanie McCloud signed the Addendum to Director’s Third Amended Order that Reopens Restaurants, Bars, Banquet and Catering Facilities and Services to Dine-In Service, with Exceptions. This amended order, which went into effect on February 11, 2021 at 11:59 p.m., reopens self-service food stations in restaurants, bars, and banquet and catering facilities as long as the following conditions are met:

  • Customers must wear facial coverings while using self-service food stations or in line for self-service food stations. Those unable to wear a facial covering must be served by an employee.
  • Buffet tables/salad bars must be spaced a minimum of 6 feet away from customer seating/tables, and lines must not extend into seating areas.
  • Customer flow at buffet tables/salad bars must move in one direction with a beginning point and ending point, and customers must maintain at least 6 feet of social distancing while in line. Directional signage must be posted indicating where the customer line begins.
  • Hand sanitizer must be placed at self-serve food stations, including at the front of the line and end of the line of buffet tables/salad bars, and used by customers prior to, and after, serving themselves.
  • At least 6 feet of social distancing must be maintained between seated customers and customers in line for a buffet/salad bar and monitored by employees.
  • Serving utensils must be replaced or cleaned and sanitized at least hourly. It is recommended that customers use disposable napkins, tissues, wax paper, etc., when handling serving utensils, and operators of self-service food stations are encouraged to make them available. A trash receptacle should be conveniently located.
  • Use of individually packaged condiments is recommended instead of shared or bulk condiment dispensers.
  • Commonly touched surfaces must be cleaned and sanitized frequently.
  • While in operation, self-serve areas must be continually monitored by staff who are trained in food safety, including monitoring customer hand sanitizing practices at the self-service food station.
  • Food must be protected from contamination, including sneeze guards on self-serve equipment.
  • Signage must be placed at self-service food stations requiring customers to use hand sanitizer before and after serving themselves, and to maintain at least 6 feet of social distancing while in line. The signage should recommend that customers use disposable napkins, tissues, wax paper, etc., when handling serving utensils. A sample sign is available on Ohio’s coronavirus website at https://coronavirus.ohio.gov/wps/portal/gov/covid-19/responsible-restart-ohio/Posters-and-Signs (food service operations and retail food establishments may choose to develop their own signage).

On February 12, 2021, Governor DeWine announced that Ohio received a total of 214,525 first doses of the COVID-19 vaccine this week. A total of 223,025 first doses are scheduled to arrive in Ohio during the week of February 15. The federal retail pharmacy program will soon begin allotting doses to Ohio's more than 160 Rite Aid pharmacies. Vaccine distribution will also expand into all 194 Kroger pharmacies.

Those with specific medical conditions that put them at a very high risk of dying from COVID-19 will be eligible for vaccinations next week. Ohioans born with certain medical conditions, or those who were diagnosed in early childhood whose conditions continued into adulthood, qualify to be vaccinated beginning on February 15.

Oklahoma:

Governor Stitt signed Executive Order 2021-07 to continue the State of Oklahoma’s COVID-19 response. The Executive Order extends the State of Emergency to March 12, 2021 and continues to commit the resources of all state departments and agencies to prepare for and respond to the COVID-19 pandemic.

The order limits public and social gatherings to 50% occupancy, except for gatherings in private residences, buildings, or businesses providing religious, healthcare, educational, public safety, and childcare services. Attendance at youth sports and extracurricular activities is limited to 50% occupancy.

The order also requires anyone on property owned or leased by the State of Oklahoma to wear a facial covering or mask at all times where physical distancing is difficult to observe.

The Oklahoma State Department of Health announced 74 Oklahoma counties are in the “orange” risk level, two are in the “yellow” risk level (Cimarron and Beaver counties), and one is in the “green” risk level (Roger Mills County), per the state’s COVID-19 Risk Level System. The risk level categorizations provide guidelines for individuals and businesses.

A county moves into the “orange” (moderate) risk level when it has more than 14.29 daily new cases per 100,000 people. In counties under the “orange” risk level:

  • Individuals must wear face coverings in public, limit out of state travel, and maintain physical distance of six feet apart.
  • Businesses should prioritize telework whenever possible.
  • High-contact businesses should operate under stricter public health protocols.
  • Dine-in service should operate under elevated cleaning and hygiene measures, as outlined by the CDC.

A county moves into the “yellow” (low) risk level when it has between 1.43 and 14.29 daily new cases per 100,000 people. In counties under the “yellow” risk level:

  • Individuals should wash their hands often for 20 seconds, maintain physical distance of six feet (and wear face coverings when physical distancing is difficult to maintain), and practice symptom checks before team sports competitions.
  • Large or public gatherings should operate with increased hygiene measures, physical distancing, and face coverings.
  • Businesses are encouraged to consider flexible work arrangements to enhance physical distancing, and face coverings should be work when physical distancing is not feasible.
  • Dine-in service should operate under elevated cleaning and hygiene measures, as outlined by the CDC.

A county moves into the “green” or “New Normal” risk phase when there are less than 1.43 daily new cases per 100,000 population. In counties under the “green” risk level:

  • Individuals should wash their hands often for 20 seconds, maintain physical distance of six feet apart, and wear face coverings when physical distancing is difficult to maintain.
  • Large or public gatherings should operate with increased hygiene measures, physical distancing, face coverings, and symptom monitoring.
  • Dine-in service should operate under elevated cleaning and hygiene measures as outlined by the CDC.
  • Employers should exercise discretion with returning to regularly scheduled, onsite work and should follow elevated hygiene guidelines and physical distancing.
  • High-risk individuals should telework if possible, limit physical interactions with other high-risk individuals, and limit visits to hospitals, nursing homes, or other residential care facilities.

Rhode Island:

Governor Raimondo issued Executive Order 21-13 on February 12, 2021. The Order revised Executive Order 21-11, effective immediately, until March 6, 2021. Some highlights of the Order include:

  • Members of two households may gather in indoor public and private social gatherings, and members of three households may gather in outdoor public and private social gatherings, in accordance with Rhode Island Department of Health guidance.
  • Indoor and outdoor venues of assembly may operate at 40 percent capacity, with a cap of 125 people, subject to Phase III guidelines.
  • Restaurants and bars may open the bar counter and seating at the bar counter, subject to additional requirements.

Utah:

On February 12, 2021, Governor Cox signed a concurrent resolution recognizing the efforts of the state health departments and other individuals that have contributed to containing the spread of COVID-19 in the state. Additionally, the Utah Department of Health announced new guidance on their recent changes to the COVID-19 Transmission Index. These changes include updates on public gathering requirements when transmission levels reach low and moderate stages. In areas of moderate transmission, the new requirements are:

  • Public gatherings can occur with side-by-side seating, but event hosts must complete an event template, all guests must wear masks, guests must have assigned seating, and guests must attest to being free of COVID-19 symptoms or exposures for 14 days prior to the event.
  • During Moderate phase, concession stands must be closed because of the increased risk of transmission of COVID-19.
  • Physical distance is still strongly recommended.

In addition to the moderate level changes, the Department of Health has also announced changes to low transmission levels. The changes for low transmission levels include mask mandates, as well as a requirement that hosts complete an event template. Updated COVID-19 transmission level guidance can be found here.

Vermont:

On February 15, 2021, Governor Scott signed Addendum 11 to Amended and Restarted Executive Order 01-20, which extended Order 01-20 through March 15, 2021. The directives set forth in Addendum 10 remain unchanged.

On February 12, 2021, the Vermont Department of Public Health announced that Vermonters age 70 and older will be able to book an appointment for their COVID-19 vaccine starting February 16, 2021.

February 11, 2021

Connecticut:

On February 10, 2021, Gov. Ned Lamont signed Executive Order 10A, which extended most COVID-19 related emergency measures, including the Statewide Eviction Moratorium, until April 21, 2021. However, civil liabilities protections for health care that were previously in effect will expire on March 1, 2021, absent any further action from Lamont or the legislature. Lamont had previously signed an executive order that protected health care providers from civil liability for injuries or death in relation to COVID-19 as long as the providers were acting in good faith. Based on E.O. 10A, those protections will expire at the end of the month.

District of Columbia:

On February 10, 2021, DC Health announced that approximately 2,500 vaccination appointments will be made available to DC resident who live in priority zip codes and are 65 years or older and/or work in a healthcare setting. The priority zip codes are focused in Wards 5, 7, and 8 and include 20422, 20011, 20017, 20018, 20002, 20001, 20019, 20020, 20032, 20593. The following populations are now receiving the vaccine in Washington, DC:

  • individuals who work in health care settings;
  • members of the Fire and Emergency Medical Services Department;
  • residents of long-term and intermediate care facilities and residents of community residential facilities/group homes;
  • DC residents who are 65 years old and older;
  • individuals experiencing homelessness;
  • members of the Metropolitan Police Department;
  • Continuity of District Government personnel;
  • Department of Corrections employees and residents;
  • teachers and staff who are, or will be, working in person at a traditional or public charter school; and
  • child care workers and teachers and staff at independent schools in DC.

Illinois:

Governor Pritzker announced that the state is deploying three Disaster Survivor Assistance (DSA) teams throughout the state to serve as community outreach specialists at county-run COVID-19 vaccination sites. The teams will be used to assist individuals in making vaccination appointments and contacting seniors and other eligible populations about the availability of the vaccine.

(Chicago): Mayor Lori Lightfoot, with Cook County Board President Toni Preckwinkle, announced that the City of Chicago and Cook County would not be expanding eligibility in the current phase of the vaccine rollout. The state of Illinois recently announced expansion of eligibility under Phase 1B of its vaccine rollout.

Kansas:

(Johnson County): On February 10, 2021, Governor Laura Kelly announced that pharmacies at eight select Hen House, Price Chopper, and Walmart locations in Johnson County will begin offering a limited number of COVID-19 vaccines in the coming days through the Federal Retail Pharmacy Program:

  • Price Chopper, 4950 Roe Blvd., Roeland Park
  • Price Chopper, 12010 W. 63rd St., Shawnee
  • Price Chopper, 15970 S. Mur-Len Road, Olathe
  • Price Chopper, 2101 E. Santa Fe St., Olathe
  • Price Chopper, 7000 W. 75th St., Overland Park
  • Hen House, 13600 S. Blackbob Road, Olathe
  • Hen House, 6900 W. 135th St., Overland Park
  • Walmart, 13600 S. Alden St., Olathe

In addition, two pharmacies in nearby Wyandotte County will also be receiving some vaccines:

  • Hen House, 8120 Parallel Parkway, Kansas City, Kan.
  • Price Chopper, 7600 State Ave., Kansas City, Kan.

Vaccine supply through this channel will be extremely limited and aimed at residents 65 and older who are eligible to be vaccinated in Phase 2 of the state’s vaccine rollout plan. It is unclear when exactly doses might become available at these retail pharmacy locations. The CDC says residents who are eligible to be vaccinated should check pharmacy websites for more information.

Roughly 8,700 doses in total are set to be shipped to Kansas for use in more than 30 counties as part of the Federal Retail Pharmacy Program. For context, Johnson County estimates some 150,000 county residents are eligible in Phase 2 (more than 30,000 of which have already been vaccinated). Currently in Johnson County, all individuals 65 years and older are eligible to be vaccinated, along with some “high contact critical workers” like teachers, first responders and grocery store employees.

Michigan:

The Michigan Department of Health and Human Services (“MDHHS”) released its latest order spelling out Mandatory Testing procedures for Prison Staff. The procedures include:

  • Testing all staff at the facility where the outbreak of special concern has been declared. Testing must be performed daily for at least 14 days following the notification.
  • Excluding from work staff who do not receive a test when required to get tested.
  • Excluding from work staff who are found to be COVID-19 positive until they meet all return to work criteria established by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

These procedures are to be implemented by a facility upon notification by MDHHS that an outbreak at a prison is of special concern and will remain in place for the duration of the outbreak.

Montana:

On February 10, 2021, Governor Gianforte signed Senate Bill No. 65 into law. SB 65 provides an affirmative defense for businesses and other private entities against legal liability in the event someone is injured or dies after being exposed to COVID-19 on their premises. To avail themselves of this shield, businesses must take “reasonable measures” to follow public-health guidelines. The only exceptions to this liability shield are actions constituting gross negligence, or willful and wanton misconduct, or intentional torts.

Nebraska:

This week, Nebraska is scheduled to receive 31,625 first doses and 23,500 second doses of the COVID-19 vaccine. The state’s 19 health departments are continuing to coordinate vaccination for Phase 1 priority groups, and community clinics are staggering vaccine appointments in order to observe social distancing during administration and post-vaccine monitoring. In addition to the recently-announce series of online town hall events intended to reach the state’s African American residents, DHHS immunization leaders are periodically hosting Facebook Live sessions to provide vaccine updates and answer questions.

New York:

Governor Cuomo announced the State of New York will update its quarantine guidance to conform to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s new guidance. Accordingly, those who have received the second shot of the vaccine are no longer required to quarantine within 90 days after the second shot.

(New York City): On February 11, 2021, Mayor de Blasio signed Executive Order 181 extending the State of Emergency declaration in New York City.

North Dakota:

As of February 11, 2021, a total of 92,266 North Dakota residents have received at least one dose of the COVID-19 vaccine. Beginning this week, Thrifty White Pharmacy is receiving federal doses of the vaccine. Residents can visit the pharmacy website to find locations with available clinic slots in their area.

Ohio:

On February 11, 2021, Governor Mike DeWine lifted Ohio’s curfew. Governor DeWine stated the curfew could be reimplemented if case numbers rise again.

Oklahoma:

Governor Stitt announced the COVID-19 vaccine will be available to the next priority groups in Phase 2 of the state’s vaccine distribution plan. The following groups will be eligible for a vaccine starting the week of February 22:

  • Oklahomans under the age of 65 with comorbidities (including but not limited to hypertension, obesity, cardiovascular disease, Down syndrome, diabetes mellitus, chronic lung, liver, or renal disease, and cancer); and
  • Teachers and staff in public and private Pre-K-12 schools and educational settings.

Washington:

Effective February 15, 2021, five additional regions will join the West and Puget Sound regions in the second phase of Washington’s reopening plan. This change will alter the restrictions in the East, North, North Central, Northwest, and Southwest regions. Remaining in the first phase is the South Central region, comprised of Benton, Franklin, Columbia, Kittitas, Walla Walla, and Yakima counties.

February 10, 2021

Colorado:

Colorado recently initiated “Dial 2.0” as its new metric to determine appropriate COVID-19 restriction levels. The following counties have moved down to level yellow as of February 6, 2021:

  • Adams
  • Alamosa
  • Arapahoe
  • Baca
  • Boulder
  • Broomfield
  • Chaffee
  • Cheyenne
  • Conejos
  • Costilla
  • Delta
  • Denver
  • Douglas
  • El Paso
  • Elbert
  • Fremont
  • Galveston
  • Garfield
  • Jefferson
  • Larimer
  • Las Animas
  • Logan
  • Mineral
  • Montezuma
  • Montrose
  • Park
  • Prowers
  • Rio Blanco
  • Rio Grande
  • Teller
  • Weld
  • Yuma

No counties in Colorado are at level red or purple, the two most restrictive levels. To view real-time Colorado COVID-19 levels by county, click here.

For information on how to sign up for the COVID-19 vaccine in Colorado, please visit www.cocovidvaccine.org or call 1-877-CO VAX CO.

Florida:

(Miami-Dade County): On February 10, 2021, Mayor Daniella Cava issued an executive order further extending the state of local emergency for an additional seven-day period, beginning on February 11, 2021. The order was accompanied by an affidavit justifying the extension.

(Broward County): On February 8, 2021, County Administrator Bertha Henry issued a Declaration of Emergency further extending the local state of emergency for 7 days, starting at 9:00 a.m. on February 9, 2021.

Idaho:

On February 8, 2021, Idaho rolled out a new COVID-19 vaccine administration data tool as Governor Little promised in his January 28 executive order. The new tool shows the number of COVID-19 vaccine doses that individual providers and local public health districts have been allocated and the number of doses that remain for them to administer. The dashboard helps ensure the vaccine is being administered in a timely fashion. As of last week, 84 percent of first doses received in Idaho have been administered.

Illinois:

On February 5, 2021, Governor Pritzker issued a Gubernatorial Disaster Proclamation extending the state of emergency in Illinois and the exercise of emergency powers for 30 days. The proclamation directs the coordination of various state agencies under the Illinois Emergency Management Act in the state’s ongoing response to the COVID-19 pandemic.

On February 10, 2021, Governor Pritzker announced an expansion of Phase 1B of the state’s vaccine rollout that will begin on February 25. Phase 1B eligibility will expand to include individuals 16 and older who have comorbidities and underlying conditions as defined by the CDC. Illinois will also prioritize individuals with disabilities. The expansion applies to the following high-risk categories and is subject to change as guidance evolves:

  • Cancer
  • Chronic Kidney Disease
  • COPD (Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease)
  • Diabetes
  • Heart Condition
  • Immunocompromised State from a Solid Organ Transplant
  • Obesity
  • Pregnancy
  • Pulmonary Disease
  • Sickle Cell Disease

(Chicago): Mayor Lightfoot announced a roadmap to ease COVID-19 regulations on businesses. Effective February 11, 2021, restaurants and events can open with the lesser of 25% capacity or 50 people per room or floor. The city is currently in the “high-risk” stage and will move into the “moderate risk” stage when the average daily case count falls below 400.

Other regulations for bars and restaurants will remain the same, including:

  • Food must be available at all times to offer indoor service;
  • Maximum of 6 patrons at indoor and outdoor tables;
  • Patrons can sit at bars with 6 feet between each party;
  • Face coverings must be worn at all times except when patrons are eating or drinking;
  • Patrons must be seated while eating or drinking;
  • Tables must be 6 feet apart;
  • Service must close at 12:00 a.m.; and
  • Alcohol sales must end at 11:00 p.m.

Kentucky:

On February 10, 2021, officials announced that the statewide rate of Kentuckians testing positive continued to drop, hitting 7.5 percent on Wednesday, down slightly from Tuesday’s rate of 7.66 percent.

Louisiana:

On February 10, 2021, Louisiana issued an emergency order allowing certain medical professionals to administer COVID-19 vaccines by the prescribed protocol instead of a patient-specific order from a physician or prescribing practitioner.

Maryland:

On February 10, 2021, Governor Hogan announced that the state health insurance marketplace, Maryland Health Connection, will extend its current special enrollment period so that uninsured Marylanders have the opportunity to enroll in health coverage until May 15. Coverage enrollment dates and corresponding start dates are as follows:

  • Enroll by February 15 for coverage that starts on February 1.
  • Enroll February 16–March 15 for coverage that starts on March 1.
  • Enroll March 16–April 15 for coverage that starts on April 1.
  • Enroll April 16–May 15 for coverage that starts on May 1.

Mississippi:

The Mississippi Department of Health has compiled information regarding the selected Walmart pharmacies that will begin providing COVID-19 vaccinations to the public. Appointments must be made online directly through Walmart. The state’s drive through vaccination sites remain in operation. Currently, people aged 65 and older, people aged 16-64 with a chronic health condition, healthcare workers, EMT/paramedics, and residents and staff of long-term healthcare facilities are eligible for the vaccine.

Missouri:

(St. Louis County): The St. Louis County Department of Public Health issued its Third Amended Safer at Home Order, which takes effect at 12:01 a.m. on February 11, 2021, rescinding and replacing the January 29, 2021 Order and remaining in effect until rescinded or amended. Under the amended Order, all previous restrictions and the curfew remain in effect, except businesses with capacity limits (including restaurants, drinking establishments, banquet facilities, and hotel conference rooms) must limit occupancy to 50% of that authorized.

(City of Columbia): The City of Columbia issued Order No. 2020-19 extending phase two, step three of its reopening plans until 11:59 p.m. on March 4, 2021. Additionally, the order modifies certain prior provisions by requiring:

  • Bars and restaurants that serve alcohol to close no later than midnight, including curb-side and delivery (but excluding restaurants that do not serve alcohol).
  • Entertainment venues to close no later than midnight.

(Boone County): Boone County issued Order No. 2020-19C, which takes effect at 12:00 p.m. on February 12, 2021 and remains in effect until 11:59 p.m. on March 4, 2021, superseding and replacing all previous orders. Under this order:

  • Businesses must continue to adhere to social distancing and regular disinfecting.
  • Gatherings held at businesses open to the public must be limited to 50% of their capacity, or a maximum of 100 people.
  • Bars and restaurants that serve alcohol to close no later than midnight, including curb-side and delivery (but excluding restaurants that do not serve alcohol).
  • All restaurants and bars are permitted to operate without occupancy limits provided that:
    • Groups are limited to 10 persons;
    • Social distancing between tables is observed;
    • Standing bars or buffets are not utilized;
    • Customers must wear a mask when not seated; and
    • Customers must remain seated when not entering, exiting, or vising the restroom.
  • Entertainment venues must adhere to the following restrictions:
    • Limit their capacity to 100 people;
    • Food and beverages must be consumed while seated;
    • Tables must be limited to 10 persons per table;
    • Social distancing between tables must be maintained;
    • Patrons must wear a mask when not seated; and
    • Close by midnight.
  • Child care services must:
    • Maintain stable groups;
    • Keep groups separate and in different rooms;
    • Keep the same provider with the same group of children; and
    • Limit groups to 50 children.
  • Personal care services are limited to 50% capacity or 50 people, whichever is fewer.
  • Pools must limit their capacity to 50 people with social distancing.

Nebraska:

As the state battles extreme winter weather, some Nebraska test sites are adjusting their hours. Those registered for testing are encouraged to regularly check for updates.

The following facilities will be closed on Friday, February 12, 2021:

  • Chadron - Chadron Community Hospital
  • Broken Bow - Melham Medical Center

Free testing is still available to any Nebraska resident at over 60 statewide testing sites. The Department of Health and Human Services encourages residents to register, despite the weather-related scheduling changes.

(Lincoln): Nebraska DHHS is taking steps to reach African American residents by partnering with the Lincoln-Lancaster Health Department and Senior Pastor Tremaine Combs of Mt. Zion Baptist Church, one of the largest and the oldest historically African American churches in the region. The partnership is dedicated to providing accurate information about the safety and effectiveness of COVID-19 vaccines to individuals who are twice as likely to contract, four times as likely to be hospitalized, and three times as likely to die from COVID-19.

In several upcoming online town halls, the partnership hopes to “provide a space where those within the various African Diasporic communities of Lincoln can be empowered to receive accurate information from Public Health and Medical Officials regarding the various vaccines” and “an opportunity for Public Health Agencies and officials to begin the process of building trust within th[ose] communities.” Nebraskans are encouraged to attend, ask questions, and express concerns. Information on the second town hall will be available on the DHHS website.

New Hampshire:

(Concord): New Hampshire is going to resume its contact tracing and monitoring efforts again after pausing in December because of the high daily infection rates. Health officials are now looking to move from mitigation to containment. According to Dr. Benjamin Chan, the state epidemiologist, numbers have dropped from an average of 800-900 new infections per day to 300-400 per day, so the state is “looking to transition back to public health investigating each and every person diagnosed with COVID-19.”

New York:

Governor Cuomo, in conjunction with the Biden administration, announced that the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) will establish two community-based mass vaccination sites at Medgar Evers College in Brooklyn and York College in Queens. These sites are reserved for residents of the borough where each site is located.

North Carolina:

North Carolina is currently vaccinating people in Groups 1 and 2, which include health care workers, long-term care staff and residents, and people 65 and older. In the coming weeks, providers will continue to vaccinate these groups. More than 40% of North Carolina’s residents 65 and older have been vaccinated. Under the timeline outlined today, the state plans to move to additional frontline workers on March 10th.

On February 9, 2021, Governor Roy Cooper signed Senate Bill 36 to make modifications to 2020 COVID-19 relief legislation. On February 10, Governor Roy Cooper and North Carolina Department of Health and Human Services Secretary Mandy K. Cohen outlined a timeline for Group 3 frontline workers becoming eligible to receive the COVID-19 vaccine, beginning with anyone working in child care or in PreK-12 schools on February 24.

As of February 10, North Carolina has administered more than 1 million first doses of vaccine and more than 1.5 million total doses. North Carolina is expected to receive more doses over the coming weeks. However, because vaccine supply continues to be limited and the Group 3 population of frontline essential workers is so large, the state will be moving to the next group gradually. Those working in child care and schools, such as teachers, bus and van drivers, custodial and maintenance staff, and food service workers, will be eligible first. This includes staff in child care centers and homes, Head Start Programs, Preschool and PreK programs, traditional public schools, charter schools, and private schools. See Deeper Dive for additional details.

NCDHHS is working with partners to develop operational guidance to support child care and school staff in accessing vaccines. Schools can and should be providing in-person instruction. Under robust safety measures, all students can be in classrooms, with middle and high school students also following six-feet social distancing protocols.

North Dakota:

As of February 10, 2021, many areas across the state are starting to vaccinate residents aged 65 and older. The state government is encouraging residents to help family, friends, and neighbors connect with COVID-19 vaccine providers through the Vaccine Locator.

Ohio:

On February 9, 2021, Governor Mike DeWine announced progress toward the goal of getting K-12 students back into the classroom by March 1. In December, 45% of Ohio students were attending school remotely full-time, but today, less than 15% of Ohio students are still attending classes completely online.

Governor DeWine also requested that school districts design plans to meet the needs of the students in their districts that include ending the school year later than scheduled, beginning the new year early, or even extending the school day. Summer programs, tutoring, or remote options could also be considered. School districts should provide their plans to the public and General Assembly no later than April 1.

The Ohio Development Services Agency is now distributing $100 million in federal funding to help low-income Ohioans who do not own their own home pay their rent, water, sewer, wastewater, electric, gas, oil and/or trash removal bills. Ohioans can apply for assistance with outstanding balances dating back to March 13, 2020, assistance for future rent/utility payments once back bills have been made current, and assistance for future rent and utility assistance for three months at a time.

Eligible Ohio households must:

  • Be at or below 80% of their county’s Area Median Income (varies by county and size of household);
  • Have experienced a financial hardship due to COVID-19; and
  • Demonstrate a risk of experiencing homelessness or housing instability.

The funding, which was approved by the Ohio Controlling Board for distribution, will be divided among Ohio’s 47 Community Action Agencies. Ohioans can apply for assistance by contacting their local Community Action Agency. A list of agencies can be found at businesshelp.ohio.gov under Home Relief Grants.

Governor DeWine announced that Ohio's maintenance COVID-19 vaccine program plan to ensure residents and staff within nursing homes and assisted living facilities have continuing access to the life-saving vaccine is nearly complete. The plan will outline how nursing homes and assisted living facilities will move forward to vaccinate new residents, new workers, and workers who initially declined the vaccine but are now willing to be vaccinated. The plan will leverage existing relationships between nursing homes, assisted living facilities, and the pharmacies that regularly provide them with prescription drugs.

In preparation for the release of this plan, Governor DeWine urged administrators for long-term care and assisted-living facilities to find out if their facility already has a pharmacy provider that can administer the vaccine.

Oklahoma:

Governor Stitt signed Senate Bill 1031 into law, reinstating temporary modifications to the Open Meeting Act to allow for virtual public meetings due to the COVID-19 pandemic. The law also requires public bodies to post documents online that are provided to participants of the meeting. The law will remain in place until February 15, 2022, or until 30 days after the COVID-19 state of emergency expires, whichever is earlier.

Oregon:

Governor Brown announced updated guidelines on outdoor school sports, allowing high schools to begin outdoor contact sports, including football, so long as those high schools follow health and safety protocols and have in-person instruction. Schools in High and Extreme Risk counties must institute additional protocols. The relaxing of guidelines also extends to college athletics, allowing for NAIA, Division 2, and Division 3 athletic programs to resume, with the same restrictions and requirements on Division 1 schools applying to Division 2 and 3 schools.

Rhode Island:

Governor Raimondo issued Executive Order 21-12 on February 10, 2021, extended the following executive orders through March 11, 2021:

  • Executive Order 20-37 (Thirty-Fourth Supplemental Emergency Declaration - Increasing State COVID-19 Response Capacity): Suspending prohibitions on post-retirement employment for retirees identified by the Rhode Island Department of Health.
  • Executive Order 20-107 (Hundred-and-Second Supplemental Emergency Declaration - Suspending Qualified Jobs Incentive Tax Credit Certification Period): Suspending the period in which a business must submit a certification for tax credit under the Qualified Jobs Incentive Act.
  • Executive Order 21-04 (One Hundred and Tenth Supplemental Emergency Declaration - In-Person Learning at Institutes of Higher Education): Allowing specific universities to conduct in-person learning subject to COVID-19 restrictions.

Tennessee:

Tennessee is currently receiving around 100,000 vaccine doses a week. The health commissioner estimates the state will move to phase 1B, in which K-12 teachers and childcare workers are vaccinated, the week of February 22, 2021.

(Nashville): Nashville city and school leaders announced February 8, 2021 that hospitals will begin to vaccinate teachers and childcare workers in the coming days as the district returns to classrooms. The process of vaccinating teachers is expected to last 3-4 weeks and will be led by Vanderbilt University Medical Center and TriStar Health.

Utah:

On February 9, 2021, Governor Cox participated in a virtual COVID-19 Q&A session where he addressed questions related to vaccine availability, vaccine distribution, mask mandates, and next phases for vaccine eligibility. These Q&A sessions are expected to continue throughout the pandemic.

West Virginia:

On February 10, 2021, Governor Jim Justice announced that the state will receive more doses of the COVID-19 vaccine than originally expected through the Federal Pharmacy Program. This will allow West Virginia to offer more vaccines to residents age 65 and older, as well as to members of the state’s critical healthcare workforce.

Previously, on February 8, 2021, Governor Justice announced the state had partnered with Walgreens through the Federal Pharmacy Program and that the state would receive an additional 5,800 doses per week. However, on February 10, 2021, Governor Justice announced the weekly doses received through the partnership had increased to 7,300 doses.

February 9, 2021

Colorado:

On February 8, 2021, Governor Polis extended an Executive Order permitting voluntary or elective surgeries and procedures under certain conditions.

On February 9, 2021, Governor Polis provided an update on Colorado’s response to the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic and the State’s efforts to vaccinate Coloradans. The Governor announced that Colorado’s vaccine allocation from the federal government will increase by 9,000 doses starting next week. At this new rate, Colorado is expecting an additional 27,000 vaccine doses over the next three weeks.

Governor Polis also provided an update on community-based and mass vaccination clinics that he has visited. SCL Health vaccinated 5,000 Coloradans, and National Jewish vaccinated 1,000. Colorado is partnering with Salud Family Health Center, SCL Health, UCHealth, National Jewish Health, Valley Wide Health, and many other organizations to vaccinate medically underserved and hard to reach communities throughout the state.

As of February 8, the vaccine is now available to those aged 65 and older, as well as educators and childcare workers. Coloradans aged 70 and older will continue to be prioritized, as the state is set to reach its goal of vaccinating 70% of those aged 70 and up by the end of this month.

Governor Polis also extended an Executive Order authorizing Executive Directors of certain agencies to promulgate and issue emergency rules extending the expiration date of licenses and other documents due to COVID-19 in Colorado.

Delaware:

On February 5, 2021, Governor Carney, the Delaware Division of Public Health (DPH), and the Delaware Emergency Management Agency (DEMA) announced a list of community testing sites throughout Delaware for the week of February 8. Testing locations include pop-up and Curative trailer sites, in addition to Walgreens facilities and various hospital and health care locations.

On Monday February 8, 2021, Governor Carney signed House Bill 65, which provides unemployment tax relief for Delawareans and businesses affected by the COVID-19 crisis. The legislation waives 2020 state income tax on unemployment benefits collected from Delawareans who lost a job or income over the course of the year. Important information for filing with the exemption can be found here.

On February 9, 2021, Governor Carney, the Delaware Division of Public Health (DPH), and the Delaware Emergency Management Agency (DEMA) announced updates to the State’s COVID-19 vaccination program, with a focus on administering second doses for individuals who received first doses at state-operated vaccination events in January. Second dose registration and scheduling information will be listed here as it becomes available and will also be emailed to all eligible individuals for whom the state has e-mail addresses.

District of Columbia:

On February 8, 2021, Mayor Bowser announced that the District has expended $13 million in federal funding for two rental assistance programs developed by the Department of Housing and Community Development and the DC Housing Finance Agency. In addition, housing providers may also now apply to the COVID-19 Housing Assistance Program on behalf of eligible tenants.

Florida:

On February 9, 2021, Governor DeSantis announced additional COVID-19 vaccination sites across Florida that would be offered through the Federal Retail Pharmacy Program. Florida will partner with Walmart and Publix throughout the state to expand access to the vaccine.

Illinois:

(Chicago): The Chicago Department of Public Health updated its Emergency Travel Order, moving Alaska, Hawaii, North Dakota, and Puerto Rico to the yellow tier. 46 states and one territory remain in the orange tier.

Chicago residents and out-of-state visitors arriving in Chicago from orange tier states are required to either quarantine for 10 days upon arrival to Chicago or provide a negative COVID-19 test result before arrival. Chicago residents are encouraged to avoid travel to orange tier states. States in the orange tier are those that have above 15 average daily COVID-19 cases per 100,000 residents.

Chicago residents and out-of-state visitors arriving in Chicago traveling from yellow states are not required to quarantine or provide a negative COVID-19 test, but still must maintain strict masking and social distancing. Chicago residents are encouraged to avoid non-essential travel to yellow tier states. States in the yellow tier are those that have between 0 and 15 average daily COVID-19 cases per 100,000 residents.

Kansas:

On February 9, 2021, Governor Laura Kelly announced that her administration, in conjunction with Democratic leaders in the Kansas Legislature, has crafted a proposed tax bill that would generate $97 million in additional revenue for Kansas, support small businesses, and give 94% of Kansans a tax cut. The plan is proposed as an alternative to Senate Bill 22.

All remote sellers, whether selling through a marketplace platform (like Amazon or Etsy) or on their own, have been instructed to register and collect tax on property that is shipped into Kansas. Under current tax code, out-of-state retailers can dodge the use tax on sales to Kansas customers. With the proposed plan, however, the marketplace facilitator would be responsible for collecting and remitting the tax on behalf of the remote sellers on their platform. This would allow the state to collect from fewer entities and increase compliance. Kansas is one of three states that has not enacted a marketplace facilitator provision. The new plan also imposes taxes on digital products, like video streaming services. Together, these marketplace facilitator and digital goods provisions would generate approximately $97 million in additional revenue for the state. That revenue would then be used to increase Kansas’s standard tax deduction by 20% in tax year 2021 and 35% in tax year 2022. If the revenue neutral proposal were implemented, 94% of Kansans will see a tax cut.

Kentucky:

On February 9, 2021, state officials announced that the Kroger COVID-19 vaccine site in Bowling Green, Kentucky will be closed on Thursday due to inclement weather. Furthermore, Governor Beshear stated that the federal government increased Kentucky’s vaccine supply for the third time in three weeks, this time by six percent, for a total increase of 28%.

Louisiana:

On February 9, 2021, Governor Edwards announced that Louisiana will extend the statewide phase-two coronavirus restrictions for 21 more days. COVID cases are trending down in Louisiana, but due to the presence of the United Kingdom variant, health officials believe an extension of the phase two restrictions are necessary. Furthermore, the state will open its first mass vaccination site at Pennington Biomedical Research Center in Baton Rouge.

Maryland:

On February 9, 2021, Governor Hogan provided a COVID-19 Vaccination Update, which stated that Maryland providers have now administered 727,828 COVID-19 vaccines, and 85% of all first doses received from the federal government have been given. The update also stated that Maryland’s first mass vaccination sites are now open at the Baltimore Convention Center and Six Flags America in Prince George’s County.

Minnesota:

On February 8, 2021, Governor Walz announced Minnesota will expand its vaccine network by using major pharmacies as the state participates in the Federal Retail Pharmacy Program. Walmart, Thrifty White, and Walgreens are participating in the first phase of the Federal Retail Pharmacy Program that will launch this week. The pharmacies will be administering more than 16,000 doses at locations across the state to vaccinate eligible populations.

Nebraska:

As of February 8, 2021, all Nebraska counties are in Phase 1B of the state’s vaccine administration plan. Phase 1B includes Nebraskans 65 and older, those 18 and older who are high-risk, and those working in “critical industries” such as first responders, educators and daycare providers, utilities and transportation workers, corrections staff, food processing personnel, and grocery store employees. There are currently 125 vaccination sites across the state receiving vaccine shipments.

The COVID-19 Vaccination Dashboard has been updated to reflect Nebraska’s continued vaccination efforts and progress over time. The Nebraska Department of Health and Human Services is also working on a Spanish version of COVID-19 and vaccine-related webpages to better reach Spanish-speaking residents.

New Hampshire:

(Concord): Walgreens stores will be offering COVID-19 vaccine appointments in New Hampshire beginning Friday, February 12, 2021. As a result, the state’s call center will begin contacting some residents to move up their appointments. These doses are separate from the state’s weekly allotment. Residents 65 and older, medically vulnerable people with two or more conditions, and certain other groups are currently eligible to receive the COVID-19 vaccine in New Hampshire. The call centers will also contact people who have not yet scheduled appointments because they either had incomplete registration data or have not finished the final step of the process. Use this link to see if you qualify or need to register.

New Jersey:

Governor Murphy announced that New Jersey will follow the federal government’s lead in allowing Paycheck Protection Program (PPP) loans to be tax exempt at the state level and permitting recipients to deduct business expenses that were paid with the tax-exempt loan proceeds. As a result, in the 2020 tax season, related expenses paid with PPP loans will be deductible from both Gross Income Tax and Corporate Business Tax.

New York:

Governor Cuomo announced that 11 community-based pop-up vaccination sites are opening this week at community centers, public housing complexes, and cultural centers. Similar to previous pop-up sites, these sites will be re-established in three weeks to administer second doses of the vaccine. To find the closest pop-up site, visit here.

North Carolina:

On February 9, 2021, Governor Cooper and North Carolina Department of Health and Human Services Secretary Mandy K. Cohen outlined how North Carolina is working to provide equitable access to COVID-19 vaccines.

The strategies that the state is implementing include:

  • Requiring all vaccine providers to collect race and ethnicity data;
  • Prioritizing a portion of its weekly vaccines to events that focus on underserved communities; and
  • Allocating a weekly vaccine amount based on county population to ensure geographic equity across all 100 counties.

The North Carolina Department of Health and Human Services (NCDHHS) has formed a dedicated team to track and provide technical assistance to vaccine providers to ensure they are hitting targets for speed and equity.

Governor Cooper says North Carolina is making some progress in improving vaccine access for Black North Carolinians. The state has seen a 65% increase in the weekly number of first doses administered to the African American population over the past four weeks. As of the week of February 3, 18% of the vaccines administered in the state had gone to the Black/African American population, up from 11% the week of January 13. African Americans make up 22% of North Carolina’s population. The Governor believes there is still more work to do in the Latinx/Hispanic community, which has received only 2% of total vaccines administered in the state.

Last week, North Carolina became one of the first states in the country to release statewide race and ethnicity data for COVID-19 vaccines. The Department added new county demographic data to the vaccine data dashboard, including data by race, ethnicity, gender, and age group.

NCDHHS also expanded its COVID-19 vaccine help center to answer people's questions and help them determine when they are eligible for a vaccine. The hotline, 888-675-4567, is open Monday through Friday from 7:00 a.m. until 7:00 p.m. and on Saturday and Sunday from 8:00 a.m. until 4:00 p.m. Callers can get help with general COVID-19 vaccine questions, information on eligibility groups, and how to find vaccine locations and transportation services.

Governor Cooper also issued Executive Order No. 193, which amends and extends Executive Orders Nos. 130 and 139. The Order gives the NCDHHS Secretary the authority to expand the types of providers who have the authority to administer FDA-authorized COVID-19 vaccines. Through this Order, providers with this authority will now include dentists licensed in North Carolina. As the state continues to fight the pandemic and protect North Carolinians, the Order directs state officials to marshal all state resources, including property, facilities, and personnel, upon request by NCDHHS, towards vaccination efforts.

Oregon:

Governor Brown announced that twelve counties improved risk levels under the state’s COVID-19 county-by-county assessment program, with ten counties improving from Extreme Risk. Baker and Grant Counties improved to Lower Risk, from High Risk and Moderate Risk, respectively. Meanwhile, Morrow County move to Moderate Risk from Extreme Risk. However, Harney and Lake Counties both slid to Moderate Risk, moving from Lower Risk. Improving to High Risk from Extreme Risk were Clackamas, Clatsop, Columbia, Deschutes, Hood River, Klamath, Linn, Multnomah, and Washington Counties. No counties moved to Extreme Risk during the past two weeks. All told, 8 counties are in Lower Risk, 3 are in Moderate Risk, 11 are in High Risk, and 14 remain in Extreme Risk. This categorization goes in effect on February 12 and lasts until February 25. These assessments affect what activities are permitted and to what extent.

Tennessee:

(Nashville): Walmart and Sam’s Club stores in Tennessee are now offering COVID-19 vaccines to eligible Tennesseans. To check availability and schedule an appointment, visit the Walmart or Sam’s Club websites. Before scheduling an appointment, make sure to verify your eligibility through the Tennessee Department of Health’s website. Click here for a list of available locations.

February 8, 2021

Colorado:

On February 6, 2021, Governor Polis issued Executive Order D 2021 037, extending Executive Order D 2021 10 and redirecting underutilized resource to nursing facilities and other Home and Community-Based Services to help providers fighting the COVID-19 pandemic. The order is set to expire March 1, 2021, unless another extension is issued.

On February 7, 2021, Governor Polis issued Executive Order D 2021 038, which extends Executive Order D 2020 077 until March 2, 2021. The extension provides for the suspension of certain statutes to eliminate cost-sharing for COVID-19 testing and treatment for Medicaid recipients, as well as increase the Medicaid home-health workforce.

Governor Polis also issued Executive Order D 2021 039 on February 7, 2021. This Order extends, until March 2, 2021, prior Executive Order D 2020 016, which suspended certain criminal regulatory statutes to give the Colorado Department of Corrections more discretion. Under the extension, the state’s DOC can continue to make decisions geared towards combatting the spread of COVID-19 in state prisons and protecting correctional officers and staff from exposure.

On February 8, 2021, Governor Polis issued Executive Order D 2021 040, which extends former Executive Order D 2020 045, until March 3, 2021. The Order allows for voluntary and elective surgeries or procedures to resume under specified conditions.

Connecticut:

On February 4, 2021, Governor Lamont signed Executive Order 10 to extend some forms COVID-19 relief and relax certain existing restrictions. Specifically, the order does the following:

  • Excludes all COVID-related stimulus payments from state benefit eligibility calculations.
  • Suspends certain filing requirements for reapplying for tax relief programs, including biannual filing requirements for the state’s veterans tax relief program and documentation requirements for maintaining eligibility for Homeowners’ tax relief programs.
  • Allows commuter lots to be used for COVID-19 vaccination and testing efforts.
  • Postpones a new fee structure for alcohol licenses imposed by a state law passed in 2019 scheduled to take effect on July 1, 2020 until April 20, 2021.
  • Requires local and regional boards of education to continue to provide two weeks of paid leave (or equivalent) for school district employees who missed work for the following reasons:
    • They were self-quarantining due to COVID-19;
    • The school closed because someone at the school was exposed;
    • They were caring for someone subject to quarantine;
    • They were diagnosed with COVID-19;
    • They experienced COVID-19 symptoms and sought medical attention; or
    • They were required to care for a child whose school or place of care was closed or unavailable due to COVID-19.
  • Ends the attendance cap on religious gatherings and maintains the capacity limit for these gatherings at 50 percent, effective immediately. All other health and safety measures, such as social distancing and face coverings, are still required.
  • Permits all voters in any special election or municipal primary held prior to April 20, 2021 to vote via absentee ballot.

Florida:

(Palm Beach County): On February 5, 2021, Mayor Kerner issued a Declaration of Continuing Emergency, further extending the state of local emergency through February 12, 2021. That same day, Governor DeSantis and Mayor Kerner announced that over 40 percent of Palm Beach County seniors 65 and older have been vaccinated.

(Miami-Dade County): On February 5, 2021, Mayor Cava issued a statement that the County’s Chief Public Safety Office and Chief Medical Officer would be evaluating the continued countywide midnight curfew over the next 30 days.

In a press conference held February 8, 2021, Mayor Cava announced $60 million in federal relief funds will be used to provide support for landlords. The program will provide up to $3,000 per month of back rent owed to landlords with writs of possession from March 2020 through the present. Beginning March 5, 2021, the County will resume service of writs for commercial evictions. The residential eviction moratorium will remain in effect to protect vulnerable families.

Illinois:

(Chicago): Chicago Mayor Lori Lightfoot announced the city reached a tentative agreement with the Chicago Teachers Union for some Chicago Public Schools to return to in-person learning. Although the agreement must still be ratified by the Union to go into effect, it suggests the following timeline for returning students to in person learning:

  • Pre-kindergarten and special education programs to resume Thursday, February 11;
  • Kindergarten through fifth grade staff to return February 22 and students to return March 1; and
  • Sixth through eighth grade staff to return March 1 and students to return March 8.

The plan also sets forth the following safety measures for the return to in-person learning:

  • No members of the Union will be required to resume in-person learning before having the opportunity to be fully vaccinated. The city would begin administering 1,500 vaccines to Chicago Public School workers each week, with 1,000 vaccines available starting this week pending ratification.
  • Testing will be offered to all staff returning to schools and all students over the age of ten.
  • Employees who are in high-risk categories or medically vulnerable to COVID-19, including employees with household members at high risk, will still be able to work remotely.
  • Principals would allow for reassigning students to different homerooms and sections, combining classrooms, swapping class assignments among teachers, and creating multi-grade classrooms in order to maximize the number of household accommodations.
  • If the citywide COVID-19 positivity rate increases for seven consecutive days, jumps at least 15 percent each day compared to the week prior, and climbs 10 percent or higher on the seventh day, in-person learning will be paused for 14 days.
  • In-person learning will be halted following three or more confirmed cases at a school within a 14-day period.

Iowa:

On February 5, 2021, Governor Reynolds signed a Proclamation of Disaster Emergency that relaxes the public health measures in effect under previous Proclamations. Effective February 7, 2021 at 12:01 a.m. through March 7, 2021 at 11:59 p.m., masks and social distancing are no longer required at gatherings of any size, whether indoor or outdoor, including sporting and recreational gatherings, religious gatherings, restaurants and bars, fitness centers, casinos and gaming facilities, salons, arcades, theaters, race tracks, malls, and other establishments. Additionally, restrictions applicable to nonessential or elective surgeries and procedures have been lifted. All regulatory relief measures are extended until the expiration of the Proclamation.

(City of Des Moines): On February 6, 2021, Mayor Cownie announced that despite the lifting of the state mask mandate, in accordance with the City of Des Moines August 2020 Proclamation, face coverings remain mandatory in public places throughout the City wherever proper social distancing cannot be maintained.

(Linn County): On February 8, 2021, Linn County announced that despite the lifting of the state mask mandate, in accordance with the November 2020 Resolution Approving the Linn County Board of Health Face Covering Regulation, face masks remain mandatory in public places throughout Linn County whenever 6 feet of physical distance cannot be maintained. The mask mandate applies to incorporated and unincorporated areas and areas whether municipalities have not taken action.

Kansas:

On February 5, Governor Laura Kelly announced Kansans can begin submitting applications to the 2021 Federal Paycheck Protection Program (PPP) for forgivable loans to small businesses.

Led by the Small Business Administration (SBA) and the Treasury Department, the PPP is a federally administered program providing loans to small businesses to cover payroll expenses. The SBA began accepting applications through Community Financial Institutions on January 11 and through all other financial institutions on January 19, with applications accepted through March 31. During the 2020 distribution of PPP money, 54,000 small businesses in Kansas received a total of $5 billion in funding.

The 2021 PPP aims to make the program more attractive for small businesses and target the hardest-hit industries through the following changes:

  • Forgiveness has been simplified for borrowers of $150 thousand or less by allowing a self-certification option to attest funds are spent appropriately.
  • Hospitality businesses, including hotels and restaurants, are eligible for an increased loan total of 3.5 times monthly payroll.
  • Eligible expenses paid for with forgiven PPP loans may now be deducted on 2020 and 2021 taxes and employers are now eligible for the Employee Retention Tax Credit even after taking PPP funds (reversing earlier guidance from the IRS).
  • Employers no longer have to deduct Economic Injury Disaster Loans from their PPP loan total (EIDL program was refunded with an additional $40B too).
  • Additional categories are now eligible as non-payroll expenses (up to 40 percent of the total loan amount), with operational expenses (including software, cloud services, accounting services, etc.), supplier costs, damage from social unrest, and worker protection expenses included.
  • Additional groups are eligible for loans, including 501(c)(6)s, housing cooperatives, and direct marketing organizations.

Under the new program, $234 billion is available, with $12 billion earmarked for businesses in low-income and minority communities, as well as $15 billion in grants dedicated to live entertainment venues. Through Community Financial Institutions, the SBA hopes to encourage greater access to PPP funds. Businesses that have not previously received PPP funds are eligible for loans of up to $10 million if they have 500 or fewer employees. Businesses that received PPP funds during the first round are eligible for up to $2 million in funding if they have 300 or fewer employees.

Kentucky:

On February 8, 2021, Governor Beshear announced that Kentucky COVID-19 cases numbers and positivity rates are trending downward. The Governor stated that Kentuckians must continue to follow public health guideline to maintain the downward trend.

Louisiana:

On February 8, 2021, the Louisiana Health Department released a list of 378 vaccine providers across the state that will receive the state’s very limited supply of COVID vaccine doses for the week of February 8.

Michigan:

The Michigan Department of Health and Human Services released an updated Gatherings and Face Mask Order clarifying the gathering restrictions on a variety of indoor, outdoor, residential, and non-residential venues. Generally, indoor gatherings are limited to no more than 10 persons from no more than two households, while outdoor gatherings are limited to 25 or fewer persons. All people at a gathering must wear a face mask. The Order, which will remain in effect until March 29, 2021 at 11:59 p.m., also specifies contact tracing requirements to be imposed on certain gatherings.

Mississippi:

Governor Reeves signed Executive Order 1543 on February 3, 2021, extending the Safe Recovery Order through March 3, 2021. The Order amends seating requirements for college and university outdoor stadiums to limit seating to a maximum of 25 percent capacity outside and 75 percent capacity inside. In addition, the Order extends the mask mandate imposed on all but seven of Mississippi’s 82 counties through Executive Order 1542.

Nebraska:

On February 4, 2021, Nebraska administered over 14,000 COVID-19 vaccines, hitting its highest daily total for vaccinations so far. In the media release detailing the vaccination success, Governor Ricketts asked Nebraskans to “[p]lease continue to follow the protocols we’ve put out to slow the spread of the virus.” In the same release, and in a recent press conference, the State’s DHHS Incident Commander Angie Ling announced that the federal retail pharmacy program will begin in Nebraska next week. Nebraskans can register for the vaccine online or by calling (531) 249-1873.

New Jersey:

On February 5, 2021, Governor Murphy signed legislation that will expand opportunities for outdoor dining in New Jersey. Bill S3340 sets forth a framework for municipalities to allow restaurants, bars, distilleries, and breweries to utilize outdoor spaces or public sidewalks as extensions of their businesses. The bill will allow licensed establishments to expand their premises to include outdoor spaces where they can serve alcoholic beverages. The bill also sets forth protocols for municipalities to review and approve outdoor space expansions for restaurants without liquor licenses.

New York:

On February 5, 2021, Governor Cuomo released the list of comorbidities and underlying conditions that New York State will use to determine eligibility for the COVID-19 vaccine. New Yorkers who have one of the enumerated comorbidities will be eligible for the vaccine beginning February 15.

Last month, Governor Cuomo announced indoor dining in New York City could reopen at 25 percent capacity on February 14 if the COVID-19 infection rate continued on its then current trajectory. On February 8, 2021, however, Governor Cuomo moved the indoor dining reopening date to February 12, at the request of restaurant staff, to allow restaurants to prepare for the reopening.

(New York City): On February 6, 2021, Mayor de Blasio signed Executive Order 180 extending the State of Emergency declaration in New York City.

North Dakota:

On February 5, 2021, the North Dakota Department of Commerce announced that restaurants, bars, breweries, cafes, and other eligible businesses that have not previously applied for Hospitality Economic Resiliency Grant (HERG) funding can do so now through February 25 at 5:00 p.m. Of the 3,400 restaurants and bars in the state, 960 have received grants so far, and Commerce Interim Commissioner Shawn Kessel notes there is $30 million remaining to help eligible business that lost revenue due to the pandemic.

Oklahoma:

The Oklahoma State Department of Health announced 76 of Oklahoma’s 77 counties are in the “orange” risk level and one, Cimarron County, is in the “yellow” risk level per the state’s COVID-19 Risk Level System.

In counties under the “orange” risk level:

  • Individuals must wear face coverings in public, limit out of state travel, and maintain physical distance of six feet apart.
  • Businesses should prioritize telework whenever possible.
  • High-contact businesses should operate under stricter public health protocols.
  • Dine-in service should operate under elevated cleaning and hygiene measures, as outlined by the CDC.

In counties under the “yellow” risk level:

  • Individuals should wash their hands often for 20 seconds, maintain physical distance of six feet apart (and wear face coverings when physical distancing is difficult to maintain), and practice symptom checks before team sports competitions.
  • Large or public gatherings should operate with increased hygiene measures, physical distancing, and face coverings.
  • Businesses are encouraged to consider flexible work arrangements to enhance physical distancing, and face coverings should be work when physical distancing is not feasible.
  • Dine-in service should operate under elevated cleaning and hygiene measures, as outlined by the CDC.

The Health Department also announced that its Vaccine Scheduler Portal is now operational for eligible Oklahomans to schedule their COVID-19 vaccination. Oklahoma is in Phase 2 of its vaccine rollout, making the following groups currently vaccine eligible:

  • Healthcare workers (including allied health fields and general outpatient health services);
  • First responders;
  • Oklahomans aged 65 and older;
  • Teachers and staff in Pre-K through grade 12;
  • Staff and residents in congregate locations and worksites; and
  • Public health staff supporting front line efforts.

Oregon:

Starting today, Oregonians 80 years or older can sign up to receive the COVID-19 vaccine. Oregon expects residents 75 years or older to begin receiving vaccines next week, 70 years or older starting February 22, and 65 or older starting March 1. Oregon expects three quarters of eligible Oregonians to receive vaccines by early April.

Additionally, the Oregon Employment Department announced that it will be extending benefits for everyone in the Pandemic Unemployment Assistance program for eleven additional weeks.

Rhode Island:

Governor Raimondo issued Executive Order 21-11 on February 5, 2021. The Order revised Executive Order 21-09, effective immediately, until March 6, 2021. Some highlights of the Order include:

  • Indoor catered events with licensed catering on site in a non-residential setting may have up to 30 people, and indoor weddings with licensed catering on site may have up to 50 people, provided there is pre-event testing and there is a designated COVID Safety Officer present at the event.
  • Up to 33 percent of workers may work on site at the same time, but employees who are able to work remotely are still encouraged to do so.
  • Gyms and fitness centers may continue operations at one person per 125 square feet within individuals remaining six feet apart indoors and outdoors, subject to Phase III guidelines.
  • Indoor sporting facilities, excluding facilities used by professional or intercollegiate athletic programs, may operate at one person per 125 square feet.

South Carolina:

Governor McMaster issued Executive Order 2021-08 on February 6, 2021, effective immediately. This Order continues the State of Emergency for 15 days (until February 21) and extends Executive Order 2020-73 for the duration of the State of Emergency. First responders and 911 operators are still allowed to ask individuals requesting assistance whether they have been exposed to COVID-19. All transportation waivers for commercial vehicles and operators of commercial vehicles are still in effect.

Utah:

On February 4, 2021, the state announced that it will be getting an increase in vaccine allocation of 5 percent, which brings the allocation up to 42,000 doses per week. Additionally, the state announced the groups that will be eligible for vaccine on March 1 include:

  • Those age 65 and older; and
  • Those ages 18 and older with the following medical conditions:
    • Solid organ transplant recipients;
    • Certain cancers;
    • Immunocompromised state from blood, bone marrow, or organ transplant, HIV, use of corticosteroids long-term, or long-term use of other immune weakening medicines;
    • Severe kidney disease on dialysis or with stage 4 or 5 chronic kidney disease;
    • Uncontrolled diabetes;
    • Severe obesity;
    • Chronic liver disease including chronic hepatitis B or C;
    • Chronic heart disease (not hypertension);
    • Severe chronic respiratory disease other than asthma;
    • Neurologic conditions that impair respiratory function, including Down’s Syndrome, multiple sclerosis, Parkinson’s disease, cerebral palsy, quadriplegia, or hemiplegia;
    • Stroke, Alzheimer’s, or vascular or frontotemporal dementia; and
    • Asplenia, including splenectomy, spleen dysfunction, or sickle cell disease.

Virginia:

On February 5, 2021, Governor Northam urged all K-12 divisions in the state to make in-person learning options available by March 15, 2021. As justification, the Governor referenced the health guidance previously issued, new research published by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, and the January 21, 2021 Executive Order issued by the Biden Administration on the safe reopening of schools. Governor Northam also encouraged all school divisions to offer classroom instruction during the summer months.

The Virginia Department of Health (VDH) recommends schools use the CDC Indicators for Dynamic School Decision-Making jointly with Interim Guidance for K-12 School Reopening to inform decisions about school operations with regard to COVID-19. VDH also maintains a school metrics dashboard, which provides a visualization of COVID-19 community transmission by region and community data trends to inform local and state governments and school officials whether additional mitigation measures are needed.

Washington:

Governor Inslee enacted a law on February 8, 2021 designed to prevent the automatic unemployment tax increases that would have occurred as a result of businesses receiving COVID-19 relief benefits. In addition, the law delays unemployment tax increases until 2025 and increases unemployment benefits for persons making between $21,000 and $27,800 annually, raising weekly benefit to $270 from $201.

Washington Insurance Commissioner Mike Kreidler extended his emergency order requiring health insurers to treat drive-up COVID-19 testing as a provider visit and cover telehealth visits, and COVID-19, flu, and other respiratory testing.

West Virginia:

On February 8, 2021, Governor Justice announced that West Virginia has partnered with Walgreens through the Federal Pharmacy Program to offer COVID-19 vaccinations to West Virginians age 65 and older, as well as members of the state’s critical healthcare workforce. As part of the partnership, West Virginia will receive up to 5,800 additional vaccine doses per week.

Wisconsin:

On February 4, 2021, Governor Evers signed Executive Order #105 and Emergency Order #1 declaring a statewide public health emergency for 60 days, or until revoked by the Governor or by joint resolution by the Wisconsin State Legislation, and requiring face coverings in public places to protect the health and safety of Wisconsin residents.

Order #105 designated the Department of Health Services as the lead agency to respond to the public health emergency and directed the Department to take all necessary and appropriate measures to address the emergency (for example, to secure and maintain additional federal funding for FoodShare Wisconsin). The Order also activates the Wisconsin National Guard to assist in the state’s response to the public health emergency.

Order #1, which is set to expire on March 20, requires that every individual age five and older wear a face covering if:

  • The individual is indoors or in an enclosed space, other than at a private residence; and
  • Another person or persons who are not members of the household or living unit are present in the same room or enclosed space.

Children between the ages of 2 and 5 are encouraged to wear a mask when physical distancing is not possible.

Face Coverings are strongly recommended in all other settings, including outdoors, and specifically when it is not possible to maintain physical distancing. Individuals who are otherwise required to wear a face covering may remove the face covering in the following situations:

  • While eating or drinking.
  • When communicating with an individual who is deaf or hard of hearing and communication cannot be achieved through other means.
  • While obtaining a service that requires the temporary removal of the face covering, such as dental services.
  • While sleeping.
  • While swimming or on duty as a lifeguard.
  • While a single individual is actively speaking while giving a religious, political, media, educational, artistic, cultural, musical, or theatrical presentation for an audience and is at least 6 feet away from all other individuals.
  • When engaging in work where wearing a face covering would create a risk to the individual, as determined by government safety guidelines.
  • When necessary to confirm the individual’s identity, including when entering a bank, credit union, or other financial institution.
  • When federal or state law or regulations prohibit wearing a face covering.

In accordance with CDC guidance, the following individuals are exempt from the face covering requirement:

  • Children under the age of 2.
  • Individuals who have trouble breathing.
  • Individuals who are unconscious, incapacitated, or otherwise unable to remove the face covering without assistance.
  • Individuals with medical conditions, intellectual or developmental disabilities, mental health conditions, or other sensory sensitivities that prevent the individual from wearing a face covering.
  • Incarcerated individuals (although the Wisconsin Department of Corrections shall continue to comply with COVID-19 protocols to ensure the health and safety of its staff and individuals in its care).

Local governments are strongly encouraged to continue or create COVID-19 protocols to ensure the health and safety of staff and individuals in their care.

(Madison): On February 5, 2021, the Public Health Office of Madison and Dane County updated its Coronavirus Dashboard to include “People Vaccinated.” At this time, 11.4 percent of Dane County has been vaccinated, totaling just over 62,500 individuals. State vaccination data is updated on Wednesdays and Fridays. Only eligible vaccine populations are being reported, and demographic data may be limited until more people become eligible for the vaccine.

On February 8, 2021, the Public Health Office of Madison and Dane County issued Emergency Order #13, which will go into effect on February 10, 2021 at 12:01 a.m. The Order seeks to prevent severe outcomes and death from COVID-19 by ordering the following “as necessary to prevent, suppress, and control the spread.” A summary of provisions updated through Order #13 include:

  • A gathering inside where food or drink is offered or provided is limited to 25 individuals. A gathering inside where food or drink is not offered or provided is limited to 50 individuals. Individuals must maintain six feet of physical distance, and face coverings are required.
  • A gathering outside where food or drink is offered or provided is limited to 100 individuals. A gathering outside where food or drink is not offered or provided is limited to 150 individuals. Individuals must maintain six feet of physical distance, and face coverings are required at gatherings of more than 50 individuals.
  • Masks must be worn outdoors while participating in a sporting event, including drills, practices, scrimmages, games or competitions, unless the sport is played individually or with physical distancing at all times. All sports must have a hygiene policy, cleaning policy, and protective measure policy.
  • Six feet physical distancing is required except when an individual is actively participating in the sport. Sports that cannot maintain physical distancing at all times are limited to 25 individuals indoors and 100 individuals outdoors, not including employees.
  • Face coverings are still required in enclosed buildings, while driving with people who are not part of your household, and outdoors at a restaurant or tavern. The types of face coverings allowed was updated to reflect new CDC recommendations.
  • Customers may still enter taverns only to order, pick-up, and pay for food or beverage (indoor seating is not allowed).
  • Temporary retail stores are now allowed to operate under the same requirements as permanent retail stores.
  • Certain adjustments have been made to childcare limits, but provisions for schools, continuing education and higher education institutions, industry-specific requirements, health care, public health, human service, infrastructure, manufacturing, government, and religious entities remain unchanged.
  • Businesses continue to be limited to 50 percent of approved building capacity and must have written cleaning and hygiene policies in place.

Presidential Executive Orders:

On January 22, President Biden signed Executive Order 14002: Economic Relief Related to the COVID-19 Pandemic. This Order directs all federal executive departments and agencies to identify actions they can take within their existing authorities to address the economic fallout from the COVID-19 pandemic. The order prompts agencies to consider actions that will make better use of data, reduce unnecessary barriers to access services, and allow for coordination with other programs across the Federal government.

President Biden previously signed ten additional executive orders pertaining to COVID-19 on January 20 and January 21:

EO 14001: A Sustainable Public Health Supply Chain: This order directs the Secretary of State, the Secretary of Defense, the Secretary of Health and Human Services, the Secretary of Homeland Security, and the heads of appropriate agencies to review the availability of critical materials, treatments, and supplies needed to combat COVID-19. These supplies include personal protective equipment as well as resources necessary to produce and distribute tests and vaccinations. The officials are then to assess whether United States industry can provide such supplies in a timely manner, and, if not, the head of the relevant agency shall promptly revise its plan and take appropriate action to address shortfalls as soon as possible.

EO 14000: Supporting the Reopening and Continuing Operation of Schools and Early Childhood Education Providers: This order calls on the Department of Education to develop, in consultation with the Department of Health and Human Services, guidance and resources for safely reopening primary and secondary educational institutions. The order directs the Department of Education to provide advice to state and local educational authorities, to develop Safer Schools and Campuses Best Practices, and to provide technical assistance to schools and higher education institutions to ensure high-quality remote learning. The order also calls for the collection of data to understand the impact of COVID-19 on students and educators and calls for the Department of Education’s Assistant Secretary for Civil Rights to deliver a report on the disparate impacts of COVID-19 on students. Under the order, the Secretary of Health and Human Services shall collect data on safe reopening, ensure that schools receive adequate supplies, provide guidance on safe reopening, including cleaning, masking, and proper ventilation, and develop contact tracing programs.

EO 13999: Protecting Work and Health Safety: This executive order directs the Secretary of Labor to issue revised COVID workplace guidance—within two weeks—to evaluate current Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) enforcement efforts, and to launch a national program focused on OSHA enforcement efforts related to COVID-19 violations. The Secretary of Labor is to focus on specific violations that put the largest number of workers at serious risk. The order also directs the Secretary of Labor to initiate a campaign to inform workers of their legal rights and to work with labor unions to do so. The order also calls on other officials, including the Secretary of Agriculture, Secretary of Health and Human Services, Secretary of Transportation, and Secretary of Energy to explore other potential protections for workers.

EO 13998: Promoting COVID-19 Safety in Domestic and International Travel: This order directs that the Secretary of Labor, the Secretary of Health and Human Services, the Secretary of Transportation, the Secretary of Homeland Security, and the heads of any other executive departments and agencies to immediately take action to require masks to be worn on aircrafts, in airports, on trains, on intercity bus services, on public maritime vessels (including ferries) and in any other form of public transportation subject to federal regulation.

EO 13997: Improving and Expanding Access to Care and Treatments for COVID-19: This order directs the Secretary of Health and Human Services, in consultation with the Director of the National Institute of Health, to develop a plan for supporting new studies to identify the most promising treatments for COVID-19 and future public health threats, to develop a plan to support research in rural hospitals, and to study the long-term impact of COVID-19 on patient health. The order also directs the Secretary of Defense, the Secretary of Health and Human Services (HHS), and the Secretary of Veterans Affairs to provide surge assistance to critical and long-term care facilities and to establish targets for production, allocation, and distribution of COVID-19 treatments. Further, the order directs the Secretary of HHS to issue recommendations to states and healthcare providers as to how to increase the capacity of their healthcare workforce. Finally, the order directs the Secretary of HHS to evaluate barriers to maximizing the effective and equitable use of COVID-19 treatments, including evaluating Medicare, Medicaid, and health insurance plans in order to promote insurance coverage for effective COVID-19 treatment.

EO 13996: Establishing the COVID-19 Pandemic Testing Board and Ensuring a Sustainable Public Health Workforce for COVID-19 and Other Biological Threats: This order establishes a COVID-19 Pandemic Testing Board to be chaired by the Coordinator of the COVID-19 Response and Counselor to the President. The Testing Board will include representatives from a number of executive departments and agencies, as designated by the President. The Board shall implement a Government-wide, unified approach to testing, which will include establishing a national testing and public health workforce strategy, expanding test supplies, bringing test manufacturing to the United States, enhancing lab testing capacity, enhancing the public health workforce, supporting screening testing for schools and priority populations, and ensuring clarity of messaging about the use of tests and insurance coverage. The Secretary of HHS shall also provide technical support to state and local health agencies and assist in training of public health workers.

EO 13995: Ensuring an Equitable Pandemic Response and Recovery: This order establishes the COVID-19 Health Equity Task Force within the Department of Health and Human Services. The purpose of this task force is to address the disproportionate and severe impact of COVID-19 on communities of color and other underserved populations. The task force shall provide specific recommendations to the President for mitigating health inequities caused or exacerbated by COVID-19, including how state and local officials shall allocate resources and funds to advance equity and communicating to communities of color and underserved populations. The task force shall also collaborate with heads of relevant agencies to collect data in order to develop longer-term recommendations to address the shortfalls.

EO 13994: Ensuring a Data-Driven Response to COVID-19 and Future High-Consequence Public Health Threats: This order directs the Secretary of Defense, the Attorney General, the Secretary of Commerce, the Secretary of Labor, the Secretary of Health and Human Services, the Secretary of Education, the Director of the Office of Management and Budget, the Director of National Intelligence, the Director of the Office of Science and Technology Policy, and the Director of the National Science Foundation to promptly designate a senior official to serve as each agency’s lead to work on COVID-19 and pandemic-related data issues. This official will work with the COVID-19 Response Coordinator to make data relevant to high-consequence public health threats publicly available and accessible. The Director of the Office of Personnel Management and the Director of OMB shall promptly review the ability of agencies to hire information technology personnel and personnel to collect and analyze data and shall take action to support agencies in hiring efforts. The Secretary of HHS is to review the effectiveness and connectivity of public health data systems to detect high-consequence public health threats, review the collection of morbidity and mortality data by state and local authorities, and issue a report with recommendations.

EO 13991: Protecting the Federal Workforce and Requiring Mask-Wearing: This order directs the heads of executive departments and agencies to immediately take action to require compliance with CDC guidelines with respect to wearing masks, maintaining physical distance, and other public health measures by on-duty or on-site federal employees, on-site federal contractors, and all persons in federal buildings or on federal lands. The order also directs the COVID-19 Response Coordinator to promptly identify and inform agencies of options to incentivize and encourage mask-wearing consistent with CDC guidelines. Additionally, the order establishes the Safer Federal Workforce Task Force to provide ongoing guidance to heads of agencies on the operation of the federal government, the safety of its employees, and the continuity of government functions. The order directs the Secretary of HHS to promptly develop a testing plan for the federal workforce, based on community transmission metrics.

EO 13987: Organizing and Mobilizing the United States Government To Provide a Unified and Effective Response To Combat COVID-19 and To Provide United States Leadership on Global Health Security: This order establishes the position of the Coordinator of the COVID-19 Response and Counselor to the President (COVID-19 Response Coordinator) and the position of the Deputy Coordinator of the COVID-19 Response within the Executive Office of the President. The COVID-19 Response Coordinator shall report directly to the President and shall advise and assist the President and executive departments and agencies in responding to COVID-19, coordinate all elements of the COVID-19 response, and perform other duties as directed by the President, including reducing disparities in COVID-19 response and treatment, coordinating the effort to produce and distribute PPE, vaccines, and tests, increasing testing, and coordinating the reopening of schools. The order also directs the Assistant to the President for National Security Affairs to convene the National Security Council Principals Committee to coordinate the federal government’s efforts to address threats and advise the President on global response and recovery from COVID-19. The order creates a National Security Council Directorate on Global Health Security and Biodefense, responsible for monitoring current and emerging biological threats. Finally, the order directs agency heads to bring obstacles related to the COVID-19 response to the attention of the COVID-19 Response Coordinator, who will address the problems with the President when presidential guidance is necessary.

February 4, 2021

California:

On February 3, 2021, Governor Newsom announced a pilot partnership with the Biden Administration that will establish community vaccination sites in Oakland and Los Angeles. The pilot sites will be based at the Oakland-Alameda Coliseum and California State University, Los Angeles. These two locations were selected to prioritize communities that have been most affected by COVID-19, and preparations to outfit these two locations have already begun. The sites are expected to be open to administer vaccines to eligible individuals on February 16, 2021.

Florida:

(Miami-Dade County): On February 3, 2021, Mayor Danielle Cava issued an Executive Order further extending the state of local emergency for an additional 7-day period commencing on February 4, 2021.

(Broward County): On February 1, 2021, County Administrator Bertha Henry issued a Declaration of Emergency further extending the local state of emergency for 7 days, starting at 9:00 a.m. on February 2, 2021.

Illinois:

The Illinois Department of Public Health (IDPH) announced Region 4 (Bond, Clinton, Madison, Monroe, Randolph, St. Clair, and Washington counties) is moving to Phase 4, the revitalization stage of the Restore Illinois Plan, after meeting certain pre-determined metrics.

Kansas:

On February 3, 2021, Governor Laura Kelly announced the launch of the “Find My Vaccine” mapping tool designed to help Kansans locate vaccine administration sites in their communities. The tool allows any Kansan, regardless of where they live, to find the closest vaccine provider, and Kansans in vaccine phases 1 and 2 are encouraged to use this tool as a resource for finding providers who are or will be offering the vaccine. Specifically, the tool allows residents to:

  • Look up nearby COVID-19 vaccine locations;
  • Identify which locations have recently received vaccine doses; and
  • Access contact information for each location to confirm eligibility and availability.

As federal supply increases, the tool will evolve to support the COVID-19 vaccination effort by listing more providers and linking to details and scheduling opportunities as they become available. Kansas officials are asking all enrolled providers who intend to vaccinate the general public to provide their information for inclusion in the tool.

Kentucky:

On February 4, 2021, Governor Beshear announced that the Northern Kentucky Convention Center will become a mass vaccination site operating every Thursday, Friday, and Saturday. Kroger will operate the site, and individuals must register beforehand.

Louisiana:

On February 4, 2021, Louisiana expanded its eligibility for the COVID-19 vaccine. People 65 and older, unified command group members, state and local COVID-19 emergency response personnel and law enforcement, and March and April election workers are now eligible for vaccinations.

Maryland:

On February 4, 2021, Governor Hogan announced that the State of Maryland’s first two COVID-19 mass vaccination sites would open at Six Flags America in Prince George’s County and the Baltimore Convention Center in Baltimore City. The Governor also announced that the M&T Bank Stadium mass vaccination site will open in mid-February and that mass vaccination sites in Western, Southern, and Eastern Maryland are being finalized. Each site will receive its own allocation of doses separate from what is already being allocated to providers.

New Hampshire:

On February 3, 2021, Beth Daly, the state’s Chief of the Bureau of Infectious Disease Control, announced that the state is working to launch a new vaccination management system in the next few weeks that will only require a single step to register and schedule an appointment.

That same day, following comments from Biden’s Director for the Centers for Disease Control that schools can reopen safely, Governor Chris Sununu issued a statement of agreement.

New Jersey:

Governor Murphy signed Executive Order No. 219 increasing the indoor capacities from 25 to 35 percent for several types of businesses, including food and beverage establishments and entertainment and recreational businesses, beginning on February 5. The Order also lifts the 10:00 p.m. curfew for in-person indoor restaurant service.

New York:

On February 3, 2021, Governor Cuomo announced 35 community-based pop-up vaccination sites at churches, community centers, public housing complexes, and cultural centers. Thousands will be vaccinated at each site throughout the coming weeks.

(New York City): Mayor de Blasio and Commissioner Doris of the NYC Department of Small Business Services announced the launch of “Training for Your Employees,” a new resource that provides business owners and their employees with training in digital literacy, marketing tools, online security, and COVID-19 safety. This training will prepare small business owners and their employees to use digital platforms, like Zoom, Microsoft Office 365, and Google Workspace.

Governor Cuomo and Mayor de Blasio announced a mass vaccination site at Yankee Stadium will begin administering COVID-19 vaccinations to eligible Bronx residents on February 5.

(Buffalo): Mayor Brown recently launched the Small Business, Tenants, and Neighborhood Development Underwriting Program, or “STAND UP Buffalo” Initiative. The initiative is comprised of a series of direct assistance grants and programs that will allow residents and business owners to respond to unique challenges caused by COVID-19.

North Carolina:

On February 4, 2021, Governor Roy Cooper outlined a plan for allocating federal COVID-19 relief funds and investing state resources to help North Carolina communities rebuild. The Governor’s early plan calls for investing the state’s $4 billion share of the federal Consolidated Appropriations Act, along with some state resources, for immediate critical needs. The new federal funding will provide vital COVID-19 relief such as vaccines, supplies to slow the virus spread, help for rent and utility bills, and more funding to put food on the table.

Federal funds will provide:

  • Approximately $2 billion for emergency assistance for public and private K-12 schools and higher education institutions;
  • $336 million for childcare and development block grants;
  • Approximately $700 million for access to vaccines and testing, tracing, and prevention measures to slow the spread of the virus;
  • $546 million for emergency rental assistance, which will build on North Carolina’s current work;
  • $258 million for Highway Infrastructure;
  • $65 million for airports;
  • $47 million for Community Mental Health Services; and
  • Funding for food assistance programs, such as SNAP and school nutrition.

In addition to the federal allocation plan, the Governor recommends investing $695 million from the state’s General Fund to address other immediate needs. The Governor’s recommendations for allocation are as follows:

  • $50 million for continued hazard duty pay for state employees on the frontlines of COVID-19, especially law enforcement and corrections personnel;
  • $64.5 million for the replenishment of the North Carolina State Health Plan;
  • $468 million for bonuses for educators and school personnel in public K-12 schools, community colleges, and the university system (educators were not a part of the raises approved in the last biennium for state employees);
  • $30 million to extend high-speed internet to all corners of the state and for use in other urgent connectivity initiatives, such as IT infrastructure, security for community colleges, and enhancement of 35,000 hotspots for educational use;
  • $37 million to support small businesses that have suffered during the pandemic, including small business counselling, marketing for tourism and hospitality, the ReTOOLNC program for historically underutilized businesses (HUBs), and the business loan program at Golden L.E.A.F.; and
  • Expansion of state unemployment benefits, which are still among the lowest in the country, to a maximum duration of 26 weeks and maximum benefit of $500 per week (as opposed to the current max of $350 per week).

Ohio:

On February 2, 2021, Governor Mike DeWine outlined the steps that Ohio has taken and will take moving forward to address inequities in healthcare related to vaccine accessibility.

  • Instead of offering the "mega vaccination sites" as seen in other states, Ohio's vaccination plan focuses on ensuring that there are multiple vaccine providers in every county in the state. This week, more than 700 providers across Ohio are receiving the vaccine to help ensure that Ohioans have access to vaccine close to home.
  • Federally Qualified Health Centers (FQHCs) serve highly vulnerable neighborhoods, and Ohio's vaccination plan offers vaccines at these facilities for equitable distribution. More than 60 of these centers are receiving vaccine this week. Ohio is working with FQHCs, faith-based communities, and local health departments to pilot pop-up vaccination sites in at-risk communities. Two sites were hosted at an FQHC in Columbus last week, and another pop-up vaccination site is scheduled this week in Cleveland.
  • The Ohio Department of Health is working with the Ohio Department of Medicaid to provide transportation options for those who want to receive the vaccine but face transportation barriers.
  • Many local health departments are partnering with organizations that work to serve African American, Hispanic and Latino, and other underserved groups to provide education and offer opportunities for vaccination when the vaccine becomes available. In addition to newspaper, television, and radio advertisements focused on reaching underserved populations, Ohio will also launch a series of virtual town hall meetings to gain a better understanding of the barriers to vaccination and develop solutions. The events will be coordinated in partnership with Ohio's Minority Health Vaccine Advisory Group, whose mission is to help advise the Ohio Department of Health on how to best deliver the vaccine to underserved populations and better ensure equity. The townhalls will be live-streamed during the week of February 22.
  • Next week, the Ohio Department of Aging, in partnership with key state and local organizations, will off­er on-site vaccination clinics at affordable senior housing communities as part of its Regional Rapid Response Program. On-site clinics will be coordinated with support from the Ohio National Guard.

The state also announced those currently eligible to receive vaccine in Ohio are:

  • Those 70 years of age and older;
  • Teachers and school personnel who are necessary for in-person learning in specified counties; and
  • Individuals with severe congenital, early-onset, or inherited conditions and with developmental or intellectual disabilities (who should have been contacted by their local county board of developmental disabilities to schedule their vaccination).

On February 8, the state plans to move to vaccinating those ages 65 and up. Governor DeWine said Ohio will remain in the 65+ stage for several weeks as there's a large number of people in that category.

As of February 2, 2021, the state announced that first doses of the vaccine have been administered in 100 percent of Ohio's 920 skilled nursing facilities. The second dose has been given in 89 percent of facilities. Of Ohio's 645 assisted living facilities, Ohio has administered first doses in 86 percent of these facilities, and second doses have been administered in 48 percent of facilities.

On February 4, 2021, Governor Mike DeWine announced the two vaccine manufacturers will soon be sending more doses to Ohio. Pfizer has been sending 73,000 doses to Ohio each week but plans to increase its federal shipments by 40% later this month. Ohio should see a similar boost in its allocation, with the number of weekly doses shipped to Ohio doubling by the end of March. Moderna will also be sending Ohio more doses this month, up from 73,200 doses per week two weeks ago to 105,600 for next week.

Around Valentine's Day, state health officials will roll out a statewide web portal that will have all vaccine providers listed in one place to facilitate easy sign-up. In the next few days, vaccine providers will receive a notice to register to participate in the new system.

Oregon:

Governor Brown announced Oregonians over the age of 80 will be eligible to receive vaccines beginning February 8, 2021. The state plans to make vaccines available to those 75+, 70+, and then 65+ in waves over the coming weeks.

The Oregon Department of Human Services announced that it will continue to offer increased food benefits this month to help Oregonians struggling as a result of the COVID-19 pandemic, with benefits increasing by approximately 15 percent for all recipients.

Tennessee:

(Shelby County): As of February 4, 2021, COVID-19 vaccines are now available to those age 70 and up in Shelby County. Vaccinations continue for people in the 1a1 and 1a2 groups as well. First dose vaccination appointments are now available at the SWTCC Campus (located at 1234 Finley Road in Whitehaven, 2355 Appling City Cove) and Cherokee Health Systems sites in Frayser and Parkway village.

February 3, 2021

Alaska:

On January 25, 2021, Governor Dunleavy introduced Senate Bill 56. If passed, the Bill would extend the public health disaster declared on January 15, 2021 and currently set to expire on February 14, 2021. Senate Bill 56 would extend the disaster declaration until September 30, 2021.

Colorado:

On February 2, 2021, Governor Polis issued two Executive Orders. The first, Executive Order D-2021-33, extends the Executive Order D-2020-188 (first issued on September 10, 2020), which suspended and modified the state child care licensing law to facilitate the use of “learning pods” during the COVID-19 pandemic. Executive Order D-2021-33 extends Executive Order D-2020-188 and its subsequent extensions for an additional 30 days from February 2, 2021.

The second order issued, Executive Order D-2021-034, amends and extends the Executive Order D-2020-071 for an additional 30 days from February 2, 2021. The amendment provides for the creation of alternate care sites at St. Anthony’s and St. Mary-Corwin Medical Center to provide healthcare services to patients recovering from COVID-19. Further, the amendment makes several accommodations to allow these facilities to be set up more quickly.

District of Columbia:

On February 1, Mayor Bowser delivered a COVID-19 Situational Report announcing that, as of February 1, individuals working in-person for a licensed child care provider or an independent school located in the District will be able to book vaccination appointments with One Medical.

Florida:

(Palm Beach County): On January 29, 2021, Mayor Kerner issued a Declaration of Continuing Emergency, further extending the state of local emergency through February 5, 2021.

Illinois:

The Illinois Department of Public Health (IDPH) announced Region 8 (DuPage and Kane counties) and Region 9 (Lake and McHenry counties) are moving to Phase 4, the revitalization stage of the Restore Illinois Plan. Phase 4 includes the following notable restrictions:

  • Indoor dining and drinking are permitted for parties up to 10 people with tables 6 feet apart;
  • Indoor recreation facilities may operate with either 50 customers or 50% capacity, whichever is lower;
  • Meetings and social events are restricted to 50 people or less;
  • Offices must continue to operate with no more than 50% occupancy; and
  • All manufacturing is open and employees must receive COVID training before returning to work.

The Illinois unemployment recently rate fell below the threshold established for the additional 7 weeks of Extended Benefits (EB) to be available in the state. The Illinois Department of Employment Security (IDES) announced programmatic changes and updates to unemployment programs within the Continued Assistance Act (CAA), including an additional 11 weeks of Pandemic Emergency Unemployment Compensation. Notable changes and updates include Pandemic Unemployment Assistance (PUA), meaning:

  • Continued claimants may be able to secure 11 additional weeks of eligibility for benefits.
  • Claimants who had exhausted PUA benefits may remain eligible for PUA under the extension and will be notified by IDES as to the extent eligible.
  • A new requirement for individuals to submit documentation verifying their prior employment or self-employment status.
  • A new process for determining requests to waive overpayments.

IDES is partnering with relevant stakeholders to publicize the Mixed-Earning Unemployment Compensation program and its eligibility requirements.

Kentucky:

On February 3, 2021, Governor Beshear announced that COVID-19 spread and deaths are trending down in Kentucky. Furthermore, Governor Beshear and state public health officials recommended having virtual Super Bowl parties because in-person gatherings give the virus the opportunity to spread and mutate, and Super Bowl festivities could undermine public health efforts.

Louisiana:

On February 3, 2021, the Louisiana Department of Public Health announced that 56 Walmart locations within Louisiana will join the Federal Retail Pharmacy Program. The partnership between the federal government and Walmart is expected to increase the vaccine supply in Louisiana, but officials cannot yet confirm how many doses Louisiana will receive. In addition, the office of public health announced that it will distribute 375 vaccine doses on Thursday, February 4 at the Southern University F.G. Clark Activity Center, 801 Harding Blvd., Baton Rouge 70807. Eligible individuals must register in advance.

Maryland:

On February 3, Governor Hogan posted a COVID-19 Vaccination Update reporting that over 565,131 COVID-19 vaccines had been administered, and 70.4% of all first doses had been given. The average daily rate of shots administered is currently 21,936, which is a 64 percent increase over the last two weeks. In accordance with federal guidelines, Maryland is currently in Phase 1C of the vaccine distribution plan, including residents 65 and over, as well as critical workers in high-risk settings. While federal guidelines make 2 million Marylanders eligible, the state is only receiving 11,000 doses per day.

Michigan:

The Michigan Department of Health and Human Services (“MDHHS”) released an updated COVID-19 Vaccination Interim Prioritization Guidance document elaborating on the various phases of vaccination, the priorities of each phase, and answers common questions. Generally, the phases are as follows:

  • Phase 1A: paid and unpaid persons serving in health care settings who have direct or indirect exposure to patients or infectious materials and are unable to work from home, as well as residents of long-term care facilities.
  • Phase 1B: frontline essential workers and individuals 75 years of age and older.
  • Phase 1C: other essential workers, persons between 65 and 74 years of age, and individuals from 16 to 64 years of age with underlying medical conditions.
  • Phase 2: mass vaccination campaign for all persons age 16 years or older.

Michigan is currently vaccinating individuals who are age 75 and older in Phase 1B, Group A, as well as individuals between 65 and 74 years old in Phase 1C.

Montana:

On February 2, 2021, Governor Gianforte announced an unexpected supply of 19,500 doses of the COVID-19 vaccine will be redirected from CVS and Walgreens to hospitals across Montana. According to the Governor, the newly redirected vaccines will allow nearly 10,000 more Montanans in Phase 1B to be fully vaccinated.

Nebraska:

As of February 2, 2021, hospitalizations within the state have continued to decline. Because the state is still within the early stages of the vaccination effort, Dr. Gary Anthone, the CMO and Director of Public Health for Nebraska’s DHHS, reminds Nebraskans to be #BigRedResponsible by wearing a mask, regularly washing hands, and staying home when sick.

Oregon:

As of January 29, 2021, the Oregon Health Department updated its county-by-county guidelines to allow restaurants, bars, distilleries, and tasting rooms to have outdoor dining in covered structures, provided that such structures have at least two non-adjacent sides open. Additionally, “extreme risk” counties may now have a maximum of 50 people in outdoor dining settings, compared to the 75-person cap in “high risk” counties, 150-person cap in “moderate risk” counties, and 300-person cap in “lower risk” counties.

Rhode Island:

Governor Raimondo issued Executive Order 21-10 on February 3, 2021, extended the following executive orders through March 4, 2021:

  • Executive Order 20-44 (Fortieth Supplemental Emergency Declaration - Uniform Statewide School Calendar);
  • Executive Order 20-46 (Forty-Second Supplemental Emergency Declaration - Public Meetings and Public Records Requests);
  • Executive Order 20-62 (Fifty-Seventh Supplemental Emergency Declaration - School Bus Driver Recertification); and
  • Executive Order 21-02 (One Hundred and Eighth Supplemental Emergency Declaration - Amended Student Transportation Order).

West Virginia:

On February 3, 2021, Governor Jim Justice announced that West Virginia has received an increase in its allocation of vaccine doses from the federal government. The state’s new weekly allocation of COVID-19 vaccine doses has neared 30,000. Governor Justice also urged residents and staff of long-term care facilities who have not yet received the COVID-19 vaccine to register to receive their first doses.

February 2, 2021

Delaware:

On February 2, 2021, Governor Carney, the Delaware Division of Public Health, and the Delaware Emergency Management Agency announced an expansion of Delaware’s COVID-19 vaccination program with a focus on vaccinating senior individuals in underserved, minority communities. The initiative includes partnering with community organizations to invite seniors to events at Salesianum School and the Wilmington campus of Delaware Technical Community College to schedule vaccination appointments.

Idaho:

On February 2, 2021, Governor Little announced the state’s return to Stage 3 of the Idaho Rebounds plan amid a steady decline of COVID case counts and hospitalizations. Stage 3 guidelines allow Idaho to remain open while limiting gatherings to 50 people or less, strongly recommending face coverings, and continuing social distance practices. Bars, restaurants, and nightclubs will continue to operate with “seating only” options for patrons. Additionally, large events, such as trade shows and weddings, with more than 50 people may obtain an exemption if the organizer submits an attestation to the local public health district confirming the event will follow necessary physical distancing and hygiene protocols.

Illinois:

(Suburban Cook County): The Illinois Department of Public Health (IDPH) announced that Region 10 (suburban Cook County) is moving to Phase 4 of the Restore Illinois Plan. In order to move to Phase 4, a region must meet the following metrics:

  • A test positivity rate less than 6.5 percent for three consecutive days, as measured by the 7-day rolling average;
  • Greater than 20 percent available staffed ICU hospital beds for three consecutive days, on a 7-day rolling average; and
  • No sustained increase in the number of people in the hospital with COVID-19 for seven out of 10 days, on a 7-day average.

Phase 4 is the revitalization stage of the Restore Illinois plan. Notable restrictions under Phase 4 include:

  • Indoor dining and drinking are permitted for parties up to 10 people with tables 6 feet apart;
  • Indoor recreation facilities may operate with either 50 customers or 50% capacity, whichever is lower;
  • Meetings and social events are restricted to 50 people or less;
  • Offices must continue to operate with no more than 50% occupancy; and
  • All manufacturing is open and employees must receive COVID training before returning to work.

(Chicago): The City of Chicago launched an online portal for residents to sign up for COVID-19 vaccines. Chicago is in Phase 1B of COVID-19 vaccinations. The following groups of people are currently eligible for the vaccine:

  • Healthcare workers;
  • Long-term care facility residents and staff;
  • Frontline essential workers, including those in non-healthcare residential settings; and
  • Chicagoans age 65 and older.

Kansas:

(Johnson County): On February 1, the Johnson County Health Department announced that first responders, some teachers, and Johnson County residents age 65 and older will begin getting the call to schedule appointments for vaccines this week. The Health Department is working with a number of organizations and hospitals in an effort to quickly vaccinate thousands of people.

Anyone who qualifies under Phase 1 or 2 and filled out a survey expressing interest in a vaccine will be contacted by either the Health Department or a metro hospital. Those 80 and older who have successfully completed the county’s interest form and have not been vaccinated will receive a follow-up email or phone call from the county on how to book an appointment.

Hospitals and the Health Department are splitting up this week’s vaccination process as follows:

  • The Health Department is vaccinating first responders (fire, police, and Sheriff’s Office), healthcare workers due for the second dose, and a portion of those 80 and older who have already taken the interest survey.
  • For the 65 and older population, the KU Health System, Olathe Health, or AdventHealth will contact individuals to book appointments based upon vaccine availability.
  • Children’s Mercy is vaccinating K-12 public school special education staff and Kansas School for the Deaf staff. Eligible staff should receive information directly from their school or district administration.

The Health Department is working on plans to begin vaccinating more people who are 65 and older as early as next week but is waiting to make sure it receives adequate vaccine doses before confirming those plans.

Kentucky:

On February 1, 2021, Governor Beshear extended Kentucky’s mask mandate for another 30 days, noting that it would likely be extended again until enough Kentuckians receive COVID-19 vaccines. Governor Beshear stated that the mask mandate has been effective in slowing the spread of COVID-19 in Kentucky.

On February 2, 2021, Governor Beshear confirmed that Kentucky would receive a 5 percent increase in its supply of COVID-19 vaccines from the federal government.

Louisiana:

On January 29, 2021, the Louisiana Department of Public Health released a testing schedule which identifies where individuals can receive COVID-19 testing. Individuals are encouraged to pre-register. On February 1, 2021, the Louisiana Department of Public Health announced that 406 vaccine providers will receive COVID-19 vaccinations during the week of February 1.

Michigan:

On February 2, 2021, the Michigan Department of Health and Human Services (“MDHHS”) put out a Standing Order for COVID-19 Tests. The Order takes effect immediately and will remain in effect until rescinded. The directives in this Order supplement previous authorizations for testing.

The Order authorizes vaccine administration by any person appropriately trained and outlines a mandatory COVID-19 testing procedure to be followed. Persons administering COVID-19 tests pursuant to this Order must adhere to the following testing procedure:

  1. Evaluate individuals for symptoms of COVID-19 consistent with testing workflows from MDHHS or the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention;
  2. Provide testing information and/or fact sheets;
  3. Offer an opportunity for questions;
  4. Obtain consent for testing;
  5. Administer the test pursuant to manufacturer instructions;
  6. Document the following:
    • Date, time, and location of test;
    • Name, title, and professional license number (if applicable) of person administering or ordering the test;
    • Name of test and manufacturer lot and number;
    • Results of the test;
    • Presenting symptoms, if any; and
    • Verification of signed consent form.
  7. Notify individual and ordering provider of test results;
  8. Submit required data and test results to MDHHS and the applicable local health department;
  9. Promptly input information into the Michigan Disease Surveillance System (MDSS) via the secure online portal; and
  10. In the event of a positive test result, immediately notify the designated point of contact at the local health department to initiate contact tracing and appropriate control measures pursuant to the applicable state and local epidemic orders.

The Order also authorizes testing laboratories to provide test results directly to the individual who was tested for COVID-19.

In addition to the Standing Order, the MDHHS also put out a supplemental Administration Order, which gives any Authorized Physician–including Chief Medical Executives, health officers, or medical directors who are physicians licensed to practice medicine in the State of Michigan–the authority to issue a standing order for any CLIA-waiver, FDA-authorized SARS-CoV-2 test that has received emergency use authorization for COVID-19.

Nebraska:

As of February 1, 2021, 3.25 percent of Nebraskans age 16 or older have completed vaccination. The state is currently finalizing first doses for individuals in Phase 1A priority groups, and counties are gearing up to begin vaccinating those in Phase 1B. The state recently launched its notification website, which provides vaccine-related updates, scheduling information, and follow-up reminders.

New Jersey:

Governor Murphy announced that an additional $5 million has been allocated to the Small Business Lease–Emergency Assistance Grant Program. This program allows designated municipalities to apply for grants of up to $10,000 to cover lease costs.

North Carolina:

On February 2, 2021, Governor Cooper called on K-12 school districts across the state to allow in-person instruction for all students. The Governor joined the North Carolina Department of Health and Human Services (NCDHHS) Secretary Mandy Cohen, State Superintendent of Public Instruction Catherine Truitt, and State Board of Education Chair Eric Davis to thank educators for their extraordinary work during this unprecedented time. Leaders also emphasized the critical importance of ensuring all students have an opportunity to learn in a classroom and highlighted ongoing research showing that, with proper mitigation measures, in-person learning is safe. Governor Cooper, Superintendent Truitt, Chair Davis, and Secretary Cohen sent a letter to local school board members and superintendents encouraging in-person instruction across the state.

North Dakota:

Registration is ongoing for free public testing events across the state. The COVID-19 test itself will take approximately 15 minutes, but residents should pre-register to avoid lengthy wait times. The North Dakota Department of Health is also working with higher education institutions in the state to provide testing events on college campuses.

Ohio:

On February 1, 2021, Governor DeWine and Lieutenant Governor Husted unveiled their Executive Budget for Fiscal Years 2022 to 2023. The Investing in Ohio Initiative within the proposed Executive Budget includes $460 million to support Ohio’s small businesses. The proposal includes:

  • Investing $200 million in grants for bars and restaurants;
  • Investing $150 million in grants for Small Business Relief Grant applicants who previously applied and are qualified;
  • Investing $50 million in grants for lodging industry businesses;
  • Investing $40 million in grants for indoor entertainment venues; and
  • And investing $20 million in grants for new businesses, many of whom were unqualified to receive previous funding.

The Investing in Ohio Initiative includes a targeted investment of $200 million to support infrastructure projects with the goal of attracting new jobs and adding investment opportunities to the state. Additionally, the budget makes an investment towards broadband internet expansion by providing $250 million to help bridge the digital divide.

The proposed Executive Budget "blue book," including Governor DeWine's full budget recommendations, and budget highlights, can be found on budget.ohio.gov.

Oregon:

(Multnomah County): On February 1, 2021, a statewide eviction moratorium went into effect in Multnomah County for renters who have submitted a “Declaration of Financial Hardship for Eviction Protection.” It is recommended that any renter who is experiencing difficulties paying their rent due to exigencies arising from the COVID-19 pandemic file this document, which provides eviction protection until June 30, 2021.

Rhode Island:

Governor Raimondo issued Executive Order 21-09 on January 29, 2021. The Order revised Executive Order 20-108 and Executive Order 21-07, and is effective immediately until February 27, 2021. Some highlights of the Order include:

  • Travel: International travel restrictions remain in place as well as the domestic travel restrictions placed on areas with high community spread rate.
  • Indoor and Outdoor Social Gatherings: Only members of a single household can gather in indoor and outdoor public and private social gathering places, including for holidays, parties, and other celebrations. Indoor weddings with licensed catering may have up to 15 people, and outdoor weddings can have up to 50 people.
  • Indoor and Outdoor Places of Assembly: Indoor and outdoor venues of assembly may operate at 25 percent capacity, with a cap of 125 people, subject to Phase III guidelines.
  • Office-Based Business Limits: Employees who can work remotely are required to do so unless on-site presence is required.
    • Retail Businesses: Retail businesses under 30,000 square feet may continue to allow up to one customer per 100 square feet of store area generally open to customers. Retail businesses with store areas greater than 30,000 square feet, however, may allow up to one person, including employees, per 150 square feet and must make masks available to customers.
    • Restaurants and Bars: Restaurants may continue to sell liquor for carry-out and may continue limited indoor and outdoor dining options as outlined in the guidance issued by the Department of Health.
  • Recreational/Entertainment Businesses and Historical/Cultural Establishments: Indoor and outdoor recreational or entertainment businesses and historical/cultural establishments may conduct operations at one person per 150 square feet, subject to additional requirements.
  • Personal Service Businesses: Personal service businesses may stay open subject to Phase III guidelines.
  • Gyms, Fitness Centers, and Small Group Fitness: Gyms and fitness centers may continue operations at one person per 150 square feet with individuals remaining 14 feet apart indoors and 6 feet apart outdoors, subject to Phase III guidance.
  • Indoor Sports Facilities: All indoor sporting facilities may operate at one person per 150 square feet. This does not apply to facilities used by professional or intercollegiate athletic programs.
  • Spectator Attendance at Sporting Events or Practices: Spectators may not attend sporting events or practices for athletes over the age of 18. This rule does not apply to certain intercollegiate athletic events where six individuals from a single household may attend for each athlete.
    • For sporting events or practices with athletes under 18, no more than two parents or guardians of the athlete and the athlete’s siblings may be present.
  • State Parks and Beaches: All state parks and beaches remain open.
  • Child-Care Services: Child-care services may continue in small, stable groups as stated in the Rhode Island Department of Human Services regulations.
  • Elective Medical Procedures and Medical Services: Elective medical procedures and other medical services may continue subject to plans submitted by healthcare providers and approved by the Rhode Island Department of Health.

Tennessee:

Starting the week of February 1, 2021, Tennessee will see a weekly allocation of 93,000 COVID-19 vaccine doses, which is a 15 percent increase in the state’s previous weekly supply. Individuals 65 and older who are positive for COVID-19 and have certain chronic medical conditions may be eligible to receive monoclonal antibody treatment for their symptoms.

February 1, 2021

California:

On January 29, 2021, Governor Newsom signed Senate Bill 91 to extend the eviction moratorium. The eviction moratorium originally established under AB 3088 was set to expire at the end of January. Under Senate Bill 91, however, the moratorium will remain in effect until June 30, 2021. Under the moratorium, tenants who declare under penalty of perjury an inability to pay all or part of their rent for COVID-related reason cannot be evicted. The legislation stipulates that tenants will still be required to pay property owners, but the accrual of unpaid rent cannot be the basis for eviction, even after the moratorium ends. Senate Bill 91 also establishes the State Rental Assistance Program, which will allocate the $2.6 billion in federal rental assistance funds that California is slated to receive. The funds are to be directed toward income-qualified tenants most at risk for unpaid back rent. The program will also allow property owners who agree to waive 20 percent of back rent amounts owed between April 1, 2020, and March 31, 2021 to become eligible for 80 percent in rent reimbursements for that same period.

Colorado:

On January 29, 2021, Governor Polis issued Executive Orders D 2021 028 and 029. The first Order amends prior orders to reallocate $11.8 million in funds from the Colorado Department of Public Health & Environment (CDPHE). Of the total, $11.2 million will be reallocated to the Department of Corrections, and $600,000 will be reallocated to the Department of Human services. All funds are to be used for COVID-19 responses. Additionally, the amendment internally reallocated $23 million in CDPHE expenditures, funded by federal dollars, to new purposes. The second Order signed on January 29, 2021 extends Executive Order D 2020-307 for an additional thirty days to further protect tenants from late fees. Under the amendment, any late fees or penalties assessed after the expiration of D 2021 029 shall apply only to rent due on or after that date.

On January 30, 2021, Governor Polis issued Executive Order D 2021 030. This order extends Executive Order D 2020-098 for an additional 30 days, unless extended by further order. Under the original order, Governor Polis directed PUC to, among other things, waive reconnection fees and suspend accrual of late fees for residential and small business customers, as well as develop a payment assistance program for qualified customers.

Additionally, on January 31, 2021, Governor Polis issued Executive Orders D 2021 031 and 032, which both extend prior Executive Orders. Order 031 extends Executive Order D 2020-068, which ensures compliance with the Families First Coronavirus Response Act by:

  • Suspending certain statutes to allow for continued Medicaid eligibility or benefits status for individuals enrolled as of March 18, 2020;
  • Preventing changes in eligibility; and
  • Delaying the collection of annual fees for those enrolled in Colorado’s Children’s Basic Health Plan.

Order D 2021 032 amends and extends the earlier D 2020-100, which expedites the processing of unemployment insurance claims. Under the amendment, unemployment insurance benefit recipients must serve an “unpaid waiting week” before they can receive benefits. The amended Order shall remain in effect for an additional thirty days beginning on January 31, 2021.

Florida:

(Miami-Dade County): Mayor Daniella Cava issued an executive order further extending the state of local emergency for an additional seven day period, beginning on January 28, 2021. The order was accompanied by an affidavit justifying the extension.

Georgia:

Governor Brian Kemp signed two new executive orders on January 29, Executive Order 1.29.21.01 and Executive Order 1.29.21.02. Order 1.29.21.01 is the eleventh renewal of the Public Health State of Emergency Order to continue restrictions originally put in place in by Order 03.14.20.01 to prevent the spread of COVID-19. The public health emergency order will be in effect until 11:59 p.m. on Sunday, March 7, 2021.

Order 1.29.21.02 provides additional guidance for “Empowering A Healthy Georgia.” The Order, which is in effect from February 1, 2021 through February 15, 2021, maintains previous guidelines from Orders 12.08.20.01 and 11.30.20.02, including outlining social distancing guidelines, a ban on gatherings of more than 50 people unless individuals remain six feet apart, and continues to allow pharmacists and nurses to administer COVID-19 vaccinations when the vaccine becomes available.

Illinois:

(City of Chicago): The Illinois Department of Public Health (IDPH) announced Region 11 is moving to Phase 4, the “revitalization” stage of the Restore Illinois Plan. In order to move to Phase 4, a region must meet the following metrics:

  • A test positivity rate ≤ 6.5 percent for three consecutive days, as measured by the 7-day rolling average;
  • ≥ 20 percent available, staffed ICU hospital beds for three consecutive days, on a 7-day rolling average; and
  • No sustained increase in the number of people in the hospital with COVID-19 for seven out of 10 days, on a 7-day average.

Phase 4 is the revitalization stage of the Restore Illinois plan. Notable restrictions under Phase 4 include:

  • Indoor dining and drinking are permitted for parties up to 10 people with tables 6 feet apart;
  • Indoor recreation facilities may operate with either 50 customers or at 50 percent capacity, whichever is lower;
  • Meetings and social events are restricted to 50 people or less;
  • Offices must continue to operate at no more than 50 percent occupancy; and
  • All manufacturing is open and employees must receive COVID training before returning to work.

Along with Phase 4 mitigations in the City of Chicago, the city set forth the following additional measures as part of the “Reopening Chicago” plan:

  • Bars and restaurants can reopen indoors at a lesser of 25 percent or 25 people, with food available at all times;
  • Retail stores may open at 40 percent capacity;
  • Grocery stores and pharmacies may open at 50 percent capacity;
  • Health and Fitness Centers may open at 40 percent capacity with a cap of no more than 50 people; and
  • Outdoor activities are allowed at 40 percent capacity with a maximum of 100 individuals with social distancing.

(Kankakee and Will Counties): The Illinois Department of Public Health (IDPH) announced Region 7 (Kankakee and Will counties) is also moving to Phase 4 of the Restore Illinois Plan. In order to move to Phase 4, a region must meet the following metrics:

  • A test positivity rate less ≤6.5 percent for three consecutive days, as measured by the 7-day rolling average; AND
  • ≥20 percent available staffed ICU hospital beds for three consecutive days, on a 7-day rolling average; AND
  • No sustained increase in the number of people in the hospital with COVID-19 for seven out of 10 days, on a 7-day average.

Phase 4 is the revitalization stage of the Restore Illinois plan. Notable restrictions under Phase 4 include:

  • Indoor dining and drinking are permitted for parties up to 10 people with tables 6 feet apart
  • Indoor recreation facilities may operate with either 50 customers or 50% capacity, whichever is lower
  • Meetings and social events are restricted to 50 people or less
  • Offices must continue to operate with no more than 50% occupancy
  • All manufacturing is open and employees must receive COVID training before returning to work

Indiana:

On February 1, 2021 Indiana moved into the next stage of its COVID-19 vaccination plan. Any Hoosier age 65 or older is now eligible to schedule a vaccination appointment, as are long-term care residents, first responders (including firefighters, police officers and sheriff’s deputies, emergency medical services, reservists, and correctional officers), and licensed and unlicensed healthcare workers who have in-person contact with patients or infectious materials in a healthcare setting.

Minnesota:

On February 1, 2021, Governor Walz announced more than 35,000 Minnesotans aged 65+ will have access to a COVID-19 vaccine. The Governor is utilizing a network of local healthcare providers to administer the vaccine. The administration also released a new vaccine locator map today to connect Minnesotans to vaccination opportunities in their area. Minnesotans can use the map to find vaccine providers near them and contact those healthcare providers with questions. While the locator currently provides information for seniors, it will expand over time as more Minnesotans become eligible for the vaccine.

Missouri:

(St. Louis County): The St. Louis County Department of Public Health (“DPH”) recently issued its Second Amended Safer at Home Order, which took effect at 6:00 a.m. on February 1, 2021. The Order, rescinding and replacing the December 30, 2020 Order, will remain in effect until rescinded or amended.

  • Under the amended order, people may not leave their residences for social gatherings unless with family or those that are part of their support bubble. People may not leave their residences except for the following reasons:
    • Work and volunteering (if they cannot do so from home);
    • Shopping and obtaining food or drink items;
    • Visiting others in their support bubble;
    • Accessing financial services or other public services;
    • Medical reasons;
    • Education and training;
    • Childcare services; and
    • Worship, funerals, or related services.
  • In addition, gatherings may not be larger than 10 people, unless otherwise permitted.
  • Businesses with occupancy limits must:
    • Limit occupancy to 25 percent of that authorized;
    • Provide employees with face coverings or materials to make face coverings; and
    • Comply with social distancing requirements, disinfection processes and other related guidance.
  • Restaurants and drinking establishments must:
    • Limit occupancy to 25 percent of that authorized;
    • Limit seating for individual groups to ensure a distance of 6 feet between patrons;
    • Close indoor and outdoor service by 11:00 p.m., except for carry-out and delivery orders;
    • Require customers to wear face coverings when interacting with employees;
    • Provide employees with face coverings or materials to make face coverings, and
    • Comply with social distancing requirements, disinfection processes and other related guidance.
  • Banquet facilities and hotel conference facilities must:
    • Limit occupancy to 25 percent of that authorized, or 50 people or less if that authorized would allow 200 or more individuals;
    • Serve all drinks and food at tables;
    • Allow only groups of 10 or less;
    • End service by 11:00 p.m.;
    • Require customers to wear face coverings when interacting with employees;
    • Require customers to remain seated; and
    • Provide employees with face coverings or materials to make face coverings; and
    • Comply with social distancing requirements, disinfection processes and other related guidance.

Businesses kept closed as a result of COVID-19 may continue to operate necessary activities to maintain the value of inventory, provide security, process payroll or employee benefits, and facilitate remote work. Business plans submitted prior to November 17, 2020 under the previous DPH Order that have not been resubmitted since November 17, 2020, are considered revoked and must be resubmitted.

Nebraska:

The Nebraska Department of Health and Human Services announced plans to issue emergency supplemental allotments to Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) recipients receiving January benefits on February 9, 2021. Pursuant to the Consolidated Appropriations Act, which increased SNAP allotments to 115 percent between January 1, 2021 and June 30, 2021, SNAP recipients can expect increased benefits directly to the EBT cards at the end of this week. The maximum allotments are as follows, based on household size:

  • 1 = $234.00
  • 2 = $430
  • 3 = $616
  • 4 = $782
  • 5 = $929
  • 6 = $1,114
  • 7 = $1,232
  • 8 = $1,408

New Hampshire:

On January 28, 2021, the state of New Hampshire distributed emails and text messages to the more than 300,000 individuals who have registered for a COVID-19 vaccination or whose medical provider has submitted information referring them as an eligible recipient in Phase 1B. The communication was intended to help identify individuals who may require additional information or assistance in scheduling a vaccine appointment. Those who did not visit the distributed link within the 24-hour time window should contact covidvaccine@dhhs.nh.gov for scheduling assistance.

On January 29, 2021, the state of New Hampshire announced an extension of the suspension of interstate youth hockey competitions for public and private schools and youth hockey leagues through at least March 31, 2021. The prohibition will not impact interstate collegiate, professional, or U.S. national team hockey activities, which will remain subject to existing health and safety protocols and/or restrictions.

(Concord and Londonderry): On February 1, 2021, Jake Leon, a spokesperson for the New Hampshire Department of Health, announced that some state-run COVID-19 vaccination and testing sites will be closed Tuesday in anticipation of a major snowstorm expected to migrate through the state starting Monday afternoon. Those who were not available for their vaccination on Monday were offered an appointment at another date and time.

New Jersey:

Governor Murphy announced that all six vaccine mega-sites will remain closed on Tuesday, February 2, 2021 due to Winter Storm Orlena. Individual healthcare providers will be reaching out to reschedule cancelled appointments. New Jersey residents can call the Vaccination Call Center at 855-568-0545 to re-register and obtain updated contact information for vaccination sites.

New York:

On January 29, Governor Cuomo reminded New Yorkers that, under state-regulated health and dental insurance coverage, they should not be charged for Personal Protective Equipment by in-network healthcare providers.

Due to the recent severe winter weather, Governor Cuomo announced that operations at the Jones Beach Drive-Thru Vaccination site will be suspended on January 29 and 30. Anyone who had an appointment scheduled during that time will be contacted to reschedule. Further, any vaccination appointments at state-run sites throughout New York for February 2 will be postponed or delayed due to the winter weather.

On January 29, Governor Cuomo announced indoor dining in New York City can reopen at 25 percent capacity as of February 14 if the COVID-19 infection rate stays on its current trajectory. The Governor also announced that marriage receptions will be able to resume in accordance with state rules on March 15, although each event must be approved by the local health department.

(New York City): On February 1, Mayor de Blasio signed Executive Order 179 extending the State of Emergency declaration in New York City.

North Carolina:

On January 28, Governor Roy Cooper and North Carolina Department of Health and Human Services (NCDHHS) Secretary Dr. Mandy Cohen announced that the state has administered 99.8 percent of the first doses received as of January 27, 2021. This week, providers across the state are receiving shipments from the state’s allotment of 120,000 vaccine doses. About 56 percent of first doses allocated for long-term care facilities have been administered.

Earlier this week, NCDHHS launched Find My Vaccine Group, an online tool that helps North Carolinians determine when they will be eligible to receive their vaccine.

North Dakota:

The North Dakota Department of Health reminded North Dakota residents on February 1, 2021 that free mass screenings using rapid antigen tests are available for asymptomatic persons on February 2 through 6 between noon and 7:00 p.m. at 2805 Morrison Avenue, Suite A, in Bismarck.

Oklahoma:

The Oklahoma State Department of Health announced 76 of Oklahoma’s 77 counties are in the “orange” risk level (all except for Ellis county) and one is in the “yellow” risk level (Ellis county) per the state’s COVID-19 Risk Level System. The Department of Health’s risk level categorizations provide guidelines for individuals and businesses.

A county moves into the “orange” (moderate) risk level when it has more than 14.29 daily new cases per 100,000 people. The department of health’s risk level categorizations provide guidelines for individuals and businesses. Counties under the “orange” risk level are provided the following guidelines:

  • Individuals must wear face coverings in public, limit out of state travel, and maintain physical distance of six feet apart.
  • Businesses should prioritize telework whenever possible.
  • High-contact businesses should operate under stricter public health protocols.
  • Dine-in service should operate under elevated cleaning and hygiene measures, as outlined by the CDC.

A county moves into the “yellow” (low) risk level when it has between 1.43 and 14.29 daily new cases per 100,000 people. Counties under the “yellow” risk level are provided the following guidelines:

  • Individuals should wash their hands often for 20 seconds, maintain physical distance of six feet apart (and wear face coverings when physical distancing is difficult to maintain), and practice symptom checks before team sports competitions.
  • Large or public gatherings should operate with increased hygiene measures, physical distancing, and face coverings.
  • Businesses are encouraged to consider flexible work arrangements to enhance physical distancing, and face coverings should be work when physical distancing is not feasible.
  • Dine-in service should operate under elevated cleaning and hygiene measures, as outlined by the CDC.

Tennessee:

On February 2, 2021, Tennessee will begin administering COVID-19 vaccinations to Tennesseans aged 70 and older based on increased allocations of COVID-19 vaccines to the state. Tennesseans aged 70 and up may begin registering for COVID-19 vaccinations through county health departments on February 2, 2021. Find information on phases eligible for vaccination in your county and, when eligible, register for vaccination through your county health department here.

Vermont:

The Vermont Department of Public Health announced that vaccination sites will be open for those who are eligible for a vaccine beginning on February 2, 2021.

Washington:

Washington announced minor changes to its Roadmap to Recovery plan, whereby different regions are subject to restrictions based on certain metrics. Prior to this change, regions had to show improvement in four metrics: COVID-19 case rates, COVID-19 hospitalization rates, ICU-bed occupancy, and COVID-19 test positivity rates in order to move to Phase 2. Now, regions will only need to demonstrate improvement in three of those four metrics. Currently two regions, West and Puget Sound, are in Phase 2, while all other regions remain in Phase 1.

The Washington State Superintendent announced a new plan to vaccinate educators and school staff that will begin once educators are eligible for vaccines under Washington’s protocols. The new “Get Ready” plan calls for multiple vaccination sites specifically for educators throughout the state and will work alongside schools’ existing vaccination plans.

In line with requirements set by the federal government, Governor Inslee issued a proclamation ensuring that persons in foster care in the state do not age out of foster care benefits by reaching 21 years of age during the COVID-19 pandemic.

West Virginia:

On February 1, 2021, Governor Justice announced that free COVID-19 vaccination clinics will be held in all of the state’s 55 counties. The clinics are available for West Virginians who are 65 years of age and older. Residents from any county can reserve an appointment at any of the vaccination clinics, regardless of their county of residence. The earliest clinic begins on February 3, 2021, and various locations will offer vaccines through February 6, 2021. Each clinic has its own schedule, which can be accessed here. Appointments are required and walk-ins are not accepted.

On January 29, 2021, Governor Justice announced that West Virginia has become the first state in country to complete its second round of COVID-19 vaccinations in all nursing homes and assisted living facilities. As of January 29, 2021, 17,763 residents and 19,836 staff members at West Virginia’s 214 long-term care facilities have received both doses.

Governor Justice also reminded West Virginians that the COVID-19 vaccination is available to all teachers, service personnel, and other school employees. Those who have not yet received the first dose can register here. West Virginia has not mandated that all school employees receive the vaccination in order to return to work, but those who have not yet received their first dose are encouraged to register. The state has made vaccinations available for the “super prioritized” category of school teachers, service personnel, and other employees age 50 and older.

January 28, 2021

Alabama:

On January 22, Alabama State Health Officer Scott Harris issued an order that extended the state’s “Safer at Home” policies. This extends the statewide mask mandate and existing COVID-19 health order until 5:00 p.m. on March 5, 2021.

Connecticut:

On January 26, 2021, Gov. Ned Lamont renewed the State of Emergency relating to COVID-19 until April 20, 2021.

Delaware:

On January 28, 2021, the Delaware Division of Social Services announced it will begin issuing increased emergency benefits to eligible households as part of the state’s ongoing response to the COVID-19. The benefits, which are being issued this week, are part of the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP), Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF), and General Assistance (GA). Individuals can apply through Delaware Assist.

District of Columbia:

On January 28, Mayor Bowser delivered the COVID Situational Update Report which reported that DC is now vaccinating individuals who work in healthcare, DC residents who are 65 years old and older, teachers and staff working in DCPS schools or DC public charter schools, members of the Fire and Emergency Medical Services Departments, individuals experiencing homelessness, Department of Corrections employees, residents of intermediate care facilities and residents of community residential facilities and group homes, members of the Metropolitan Police Department, and Continuity Government Operations personnel.

Indiana:

Governor Holcomb signed two new executive orders, Executive Order 21-02 and Executive Order 21-03. EO 21-02 is the third continuation of the county-based measures and restrictions to prevent the spread of COVID-19 first put in place under EO 20-43. The measures will now remain in effect through 11:59 p.m. on Sunday, February 28, 2021. The county metrics map can be found here.

EO 21-03 is the eleventh renewal of the public health emergency declaration for the COVID-19 outbreak. The public health emergency will be in effect until March 1, 2021; all previous executive orders that rest on the public health emergency declaration are extended for the same amount of time.

Kentucky:

On January 28, Governor Beshear announced that Kentucky had recorded a record number of COVID deaths on Thursday, January 28. The Governor also announced that there will be delays in the state’s vaccination plan due to limits in supply. Those 70 and older; first responders; and K-12 school personnel — are first in line for vaccines while those 60 and older; those over 16 with high-risk conditions; and all essential workers — will have to wait a bit longer for their shots. The state will begin to further disclose mass vaccination sites in the upcoming two weeks.

Louisiana:

On January 28, Governor Edwards announced that state health officials are currently evaluating 14 potential cases of the new faster spreading United Kingdom variant of covid-19 in Louisiana. Governor Edwards warned that the spread of the new variant may cause a spike in hospitalizations and deaths in the next few months.

Maine:

On January 28, 2021, Governor Mills announced an end to the business curfew. Beginning February 1, 2021, all businesses that had been subject to a 9:00 p.m. closing time requirement, may resume regular evening hours. These businesses must continue to follow public health and safety guidance found in the COVID-19 Prevention Checklists.

Maryland:

On January 28, Governor Hogan announced that Maryland providers have now administered nearly 450,000 doses of COVID-19 vaccines, after reporting more than 30,000 doses administered on Wednesday. There are more than 100 active vaccination providers in Maryland, including hospitals, pharmacies, and local health departments.

On January 28, Governor Hogan issued an emergency order which lifts the requirement that bars and restaurants close after 10 p.m. The statewide order for 50% indoor capacity at restaurants remains in place.

Nebraska:

Nebraska DHHS indicated on January 28 that the Directed Health Measures in effect for the entire state could be relaxed as early as this weekend based on declining rates of hospitalization within the state. Since late December, indoor gatherings have been restricted to 75 percent capacity.

By the end of this week, all healthcare workers within the state will have had the opportunity to be vaccinated. Local health departments continue to coordinate vaccinations for individuals in Phase 1 priority groups.

North Dakota:

On January 28, the North Dakota Department of Commerce announced that the second application window for the Hospitality Economic Resiliency Grant (HERG) will be open from 10 a.m. on February 4 through 5:00 p.m. on February 25. According to Shawn Kessel, the Interim Commerce Commissioner, this application cycle broadens the definition of entertainment venues, thereby making more businesses eligible to apply. Some eligible entities include:

  • Restaurants, bars, breweries, cafes, and other similar on-site dining establishments;
  • Theaters, drama, and music and entertainment venues;
  • Professional production companies that support major venues, meetings, and events; and
  • Hotels with restaurants, bars, coffee shops, and/or banquet/meeting spaces.

Eligible hotels must submit receipts clearly showing operational expenses from the reimbursable operations (for example, associated food or staffing costs). Even businesses that received funding after the first HERG distribution may apply this cycle if:

  • They received less than the full eligible amount; and
  • They submit different expenses than those submitted in round one.

Repeat applicants may be eligible for the difference between the two rounds of funds up to the maximum distribution per grant.

Ohio:

On January 27, Governor Mike DeWine and Stephanie McCloud, director of the Ohio Department of Health, signed a modified curfew order on Wednesday evening rolling back the 10 p.m. curfew to 11 p.m. beginning Thursday, January 28, and continuing through noon on February 11, 2021. Coronavirus-related hospitalizations in Ohio remained below 3,500 on Wednesday, which triggered the relaxation of the state-instituted overnight curfew on residents. With Wednesday’s total, restrictions on residents’ after-hours movements from their homes will shift from 10 p.m.–5 a.m. to 11 p.m.–5 a.m. for the next two weeks.

Governor DeWine said reduction of hospitalizations for seven straight days to beneath 3,000 would move the curfew back to midnight, with another seven-day stretch below 2,500 eliminating the curfew. The two-week time frame anticipated for each could be compressed, he said. Increases in hospitalization rates would lead to a return of longer curfew hours, Governor DeWine cautioned.

The Ohio Department of Health released an updated COVID-19 travel advisory map Wednesday with 14 states listed. Ohioans are encouraged to avoid Oklahoma, Alabama, Idaho, South Dakota, Iowa, Kansas, Pennsylvania, Mississippi, Tennessee, Virginia, Georgia, Arkansas, Utah and Texas.

Tennessee:

On January 28, 2021, Governor Lee signed Executive Order 75, which shortened the term and effective date of Executive Order 74, which implemented restrictions around who could participate in or attend school sporting events, from February 27, 2021 at 11:59 p.m. Central Standard Time to January 31, 2021 at 11:59 p.m. Central Standard Time. Governor Lee based his decision on data that shows that Tennessee has seen around a 60% decrease in cases and nearly a 40% decrease in hospitalizations.

(Knoxville): On January 28, 2021, the Knox County Health Department (KCHD) said that it will be offering a couple thousand more COVID-19 vaccine appointment for people 75 and older as well as those who qualify in the current vaccine rollout phases. Currently, Knox County is in Phase 1a1 and 1a2 of the Tennessee vaccination plan. This phase includes first responders, healthcare workers, mortuary workers, and dependent disabled adults. KCHD said people will be able to try and schedule an appointment online and by phone on Friday afternoon. The department will announce what time those appointments will open beforehand on Friday morning. This time the department is setting aside appointments specifically for people who call the public information line to schedule one at 865-215-5555, in order to ensure people without internet access will have a change at getting an appointment.

Virginia:

On January 27, 2021, Governor Ralph Northam announced a series of new actions to increase the rate of COVID-19 vaccinations in Virginia. These actions include implementing inventory management system, providing guidelines to local health departments for prioritizing limited supplies of doses, increasing data accuracy and transparency, streamlining vaccine registration, and extending mitigation measures. In greater detail, Governor Northam took the following actions:

  • Temporary reallocation of unused inventory: hospitals will make an addition 40,000 doses available shots this week by reallocating unused inventory. Governor Northam has stated this will not impact the ability of individuals who receive a first dose of vaccine to get the second dose at the recommended time, and vaccine providers will receive second doses in proportion to the first doses they administer.
  • Consistent guidelines for local health departments: the Virginia Department of Health (VDH) has issued guidance to health districts about how to use the limited supply of vaccine doses available for Group 1B. This includes allocating roughly half of available doses for people aged 65 and older. The other half should be used for frontline essential workers, people in congregate settings, and individuals aged 16-64 at increased risk of severe illness. Local health department should use this order of priority for frontline essential workers outlined by the VDH here.
  • Increasing data accuracy and transparency. With the intention of increasing transparency and providing citizens with more information about vaccination progress, VDH intends to launch a vaccination dashboard that will include additional information on distribution and usage by health district, facility type, and first and second doses. The new data dashboard can be accessed here.
  • Improve race and ethnicity data collection: Governor Northam has directed clinicians to collect race and ethnicity information during vaccine registration and at the time of vaccine administration. Governor Northam has also announced he will support Virginia state legislation that will require this information to be collected.
  • Streamlining vaccine registration. Governor Northam has directed VDH to accelerate its work to develop a single statewide vaccine registration system.
  • Continuing mitigation measures: Governor Northam also announced he has extended Executive Order 72, which outlines current measures intended to mitigate the spread of COVID-19. The order was set to expire on January 31, 2021. It has been extended through February 28, 2021.

Also on January 27, 2021, Virginia’s permanent COVID-19 workplace safety and health rules took effect. Governor Northam approved the standards adopted by the Virginia Department of Labor and Industry’s Safety and Health codes boards earlier in 2021. The standards mandate appropriate personal protective equipment, sanitation, social distancing, infectious disease preparedness and response plans, record keeping, training, and hazard communications in workplaces across the state. These workplace safety requirements will remain effective through the duration of the pandemic.

In addition to requiring all public-facing employees to masks, the standards require ready access to hand sanitizer and regular cleaning of common work spaces. Employers must train employees on COVID-19 safety and to develop infectious disease and preparedness response plans. The new permanent regulations include guidelines for returning to work and communicating about employees who test positive and potential exposures. The Virginia Department of Labor and Industry will enforce the permanent standard.

After the Virginia Department of Labor and Industry receives a complaint related to these standards, the department will work with employers to comply with further investigation. If serious concerns arise in the fact finding interviews or the department receives multiple complaints, a formal investigation will be launched. To date, the department has received 13,000 complaints around workplace safety due to COVID-19 safety, 100 of which needed full investigation, and 27 employers were cited.

Infectious disease preparedness and response plan templates and training guidance are available through the department’s website. Workers who feel unsafe in their workplace can file a formal complaint with the federal Occupational Safety and Health administration.

Washington:

Governor Inslee announced that two regions, the Puget Sound Region (King, Pierce, and Snohomish Counties) and the West Region (Grays Harbor, Lewis, Pacific, and Thurston Counties), have advanced to Phase Two in the Healthy Washington plan originally implemented by Governor Inslee on January 11. These seven counties may now reopen indoor service at restaurants and live entertainment venues, but at 25% of max capacity. Governor Inslee also announced that the regions would be evaluated every two weeks, rather than the weekly evaluation the state had been performing.

January 27, 2021

Alaska:

Alaska is currently offering the coronavirus vaccine to the following groups: healthcare workers and long-term care residents and staff (Phase 1a) and Alaskans aged 65 and older (Phase 1b). Frontline essential workers and people living in congregate settings will be the next eligible tier to receive the vaccine, though there is no timeline for when this group will be eligible. Alaskans can visit this link to schedule a vaccine appointment if they are eligible.

Arizona:

Governor Ducey issued Executive Order 2021-01, an Enhanced Surveillance Advisory, which continues to implement specific reporting requirements for medical facilities, including licensed hospitals (excluding Special Hospitals only providing psychiatric services), and nursing care institutions and certain medical group homes. These requirements include:

  • Reporting information relating to COVID-19 confirmed patients to the Arizona Department of Health Services every twenty-four hours.
  • Hospitals must report to AHDS very twenty-four hours, data relating to (among other things) the number of ECMOSs in use and available for use, PPE inventory, and COVID-19 (positive or suspect) ICU admissions.
  • Within one week of the Order, licensed hospitals must report to AHDS information regarding the number of current and additional identified licensed med-surg and ICU beds.
  • Licensed hospitals must continue to implement plans to ensure sufficient staffing levels to staff every licensed and proposed surge ICU and medical surgical bed.
  • Laboratories must report all COVID-19 test results by name (positive and negative) to ADHS.
  • ADHS must collaborate with the CDC, HHS, Association of Public Health Laboratories, and Signatories of the Public Health IIS Interjurisdictional Memorandum of Understanding, by sharing the state’s COVID-19 immunization and vaccine administration information.
  • Health care providers or local health agencies that administer COVID-19 vaccines shall report information to AHDS every twenty-four hours regarding those vaccinated, including their name, date of birth, demographic information, and date of vaccine administration, as well as information regarding the number of doses administered, doses remaining, and vaccine administration appointment capacity and administration of the next 7-day period.
  • By 5:00 p.m. on January 28, individuals, healthcare providers, pharmacies, health care institutions, or local health agencies that have received at least 1,000 does of the COVID-19 vaccine, and that have 40% or more of their total does remaining as of January 25, 20201 shall submit an operational plan to AHDS to ensure at least 80% of the remaining doses are utilized and reported within 7 calendar days of submission of the report.

Entities that refuse to comply with the order are required to reallocate all doses of the vaccine to ADHS by 5:00 p.m. on January 29, 2021. Vaccinators that are unable to ensure sufficient utilization of their doses must immediately reallocate remaining doses to ADHS and will not be eligible for additional does until 80% or more of their remaining allocation has been utilized or transferred. Counties with 40% or more of their total does allocated to their jurisdiction remaining will not receive additional doses of the vaccine until 80% of the current inventory is utilized. The order terminates automatically after 60 days, unless renewed.

Arkansas:

Arkansas is vaccinating people in Phase 1-A and Phase 1-B. Arkansans who are aged 70 or older and those who work in education (K-12, child care, and higher education) became eligible to receive the vaccine beginning on January 18, 2021. Walgreens, as well as local pharmacies throughout the state, will have doses available. Local units of the Arkansas Department of Health are also administering the vaccine to those who are eligible.

California:

Governor Newsom signed Executive Order N-02-21 on January 27, 2021. The Order extends existing liability protections to health care professionals and providers who participate in the State’s COVID-19 vaccine administration program. The Order also clarifies that the extended liability protections also apply to persons working under the supervision or instruction of health care professionals and providers such as pharmacy technicians. Finally, the Order instructs disciplinary bodies under the direction of the Department of Consumer Affairs to prioritize investigations and disciplinary proceedings against licensees alleged to have diverted vaccine supplies for financial gain.

Florida:

On January 26, Governor DeSantis announced that additional Publix pharmacies in Indian River County and St. Lucie County will serve as COVID-19 vaccination sites. Florida will offer vaccinations at 261 Publix locations in 20 counties.

On January 26, Governor DeSantis announced that more than 1 million seniors 65 and older have been vaccinated in Florida. Florida currently leads the nation in vaccinations of seniors. A full breakdown of the vaccination report can be found here.

Hawaii:

As of January 25, the state of Hawaii will require travelers to present proof of a negative COVID-19 test prior to departure to avoid a 10-day quarantine in Hawaii. Hawaii will only accept Nucleic Acid Amplification Tests (NAAT) from a certified Clinical Laboratory Improvement Amendment (CLIA) lab test from a list of “Trusted Testing and Travel Partners”.

Kansas:

On January 27, Governor Kelly announced she has signed Executive Orders #21-01 and #21-02 as part of her administration’s commitment to protect Kansans and businesses during the COVID-19 pandemic and facilitate effective virus recovery efforts.

E.O. #21-01 allows Kansas employers to continue to withhold income taxes based on the state of the employee’s primary work location, and not based on the state in which the employee is temporarily teleworking as a result of the COVID-19 pandemic.

Several executive orders related to the COVID-19 pandemic were set to expire on January 26 in conjunction the expiration of the state of disaster emergency. Because the Legislature enacted Senate Bill 14 to extend the state of disaster emergency until March 31, 2021, certain previous executive orders must also be extended. Under E.O. #21-02, the following executive orders already in place will be extended until rescinded or until the statewide state of disaster emergency expires, whichever is earlier:

  • 20-37 – Allowing certain deferred tax deadlines and payments during state of disaster emergency
  • 20-39 – Extending professional and occupational licenses during state of disaster emergency
  • 20-40 – Temporarily allowing notaries and witnesses to act via audio-video communication technology during state of disaster emergency
  • 20-43 – Temporary relief from certain restrictions concerning shared work programs during state of disaster emergency
  • 20-56 – Amended Licensure, Certification, and Registration for persons and Licensure of “Adult Care Homes” during state of disaster emergency
  • 20-61 – Temporarily prohibiting certain foreclosures and evictions
  • 20-66 – Amended provisions related to drivers’ license and vehicle registration and regulation during state of disaster emergency
  • 20-70 – Provisions related to drivers’ license and identification cards during the state of disaster emergency

The actions taken on January 27 also affect rules regarding unemployment benefits for Kansans. Executive Order 20-50, which had been in place since June 30, 2020, had suspended the requirement to continue searching for work in order to receive unemployment insurance benefits. That order expired yesterday and will not be extended. Executive Order 20-71, issued previously, waives the requirement that new unemployment claimants wait a week before receiving benefits and will continue in effect because the Legislature did not include a waiting week waiver in the pandemic legislation passed last week.

Kentucky:

On January 27, the Kentucky Department of Public Health announced that the first two cases of the United Kingdom strain of Coved were detected in the Northern Kentucky county of Kenton. Officials announced that the virus has most likely spread beyond the two confirmed individuals.

Louisiana:

On January 27, Governor Edwards administration announced that they are expecting a 16% increase in vaccine doses for the week of February 1- February 7.

Massachusetts:

Governor Baker-Polito’s issued Order No. 62, which extends the expiration of Order No. 59 until 5:00 a.m. on February 8, 2021. Under Order No. 59:

  • Gatherings are limited to 10 persons indoors and 25 persons outdoors,
  • Restaurants are limited to 25% of their seating capacity,
  • Indoor performance venues must remain closed,
  • Outdoor performance venues are limited to 25% capacity, but not more than 25 people,
  • Movie theaters are limited to 25% capacity, but not more than 50 people, and
  • Other businesses are limited to 25% of their capacities.

Additionally, the order rescinds the mandatory closing period and prohibitions on the sales of alcohol and cannabis products imposed by Order No. 53.

Minnesota:

On January 26, Governor Walz announced Minnesota’s COVID-19 recovery budget proposal for the next biennium. The focus of the budget proposal is to support small businesses, working families, and students through the challenges of the COVID-19 pandemic. Governor Walz proposed investing $50 million in a new Small Business COVID Support forgivable loan program to help the hardest businesses sustain operations. These forgivable loans will support cultural, entertainment, and hospitality industries. The forgivable loan program will include set-asides for Greater Minnesota businesses and minority owner businesses.

Governor Walz proposed an additional $3 million per year for small business incubators serving minority, veteran, and women business owners. The proposal further included a new state total investment of $745 million in e-12 education to help students recover and catch up on learning and recommended expanding the Working Family Tax Credit for over 300,000 eligible Minnesota households.

Mississippi:

Mississippi is currently offering the coronavirus vaccine to the following groups: healthcare workers and EMT/paramedics, persons aged 65 years or older, and persons aged 18-64 years with underlying medical conditions. Mississippians can visit this link to register for a vaccine appointment at one of the state’s drive-thru clinics if they are in the eligible groups. People in Mississippi may also contact their local healthcare providers directly about the availability of appointments through a hospital or their healthcare provider.

Nebraska:

According to the Nebraska Department of Health and Human Services, most counties within the state have completed the first dose of vaccinations for Phase 1A priority groups, which includes frontline healthcare workers and long-term care facility staff. The state has also announced plans to launch a website to notify Nebraska residents when vaccinations are available in their area and provide up-to-date scheduling information.

To accommodate federal recommendations, Nebraska recently expanded Phase 1B of its vaccination program to include individuals in critical industries who cannot work remotely, such as first responders, teachers, utility and transportation workers, and food processing workers. Vaccines will likely not be available to the general public until late spring.

Changes to Nebraska’s COVID-19 Dashboard are scheduled to go into effect on January 29 and are intended to provide more accurate data regarding positive cases at the time of specimen collection. In addition, a new initiative titled TestNebraska is offering free COVID-19 testing for all Nebraska residents. Nebraska is one of three states that has joined the nationwide #crushthecurve movement.

New Mexico:

On January 27, the New Mexico Department of Health announced that twenty-eight of the state’s counties showed improvements based on the statewide COVID-19 map. Based on these improvements, seven of the state’s counties have reached Yellow Level restrictions, and one county has reached Green level restrictions.

New York:

On January 27, Governor Cuomo signed Executive Order 202.92 extending the State Disaster Emergency through February 26, 2021. This Executive Order extends certain modifications to New York law, including permitting licensed pharmacists to order COVID-19 tests and to administer COVID-19 tests. Further, clinical laboratories are allowed to accept and examine specimens for COVID-19 testing without a prescription or order from an authorized ordering source under certain circumstances.

North Carolina:

On January 27, Governor Cooper and the North Carolina Department of Health and Human Services Secretary, Dr. Mandy Cohen, announced that North Carolina’s Modified Stay At Home Order, requiring people to be at home from 10:00 p.m. to 5:00 a.m., will be extended. Face covering requirements and restrictions on individuals gathering in both indoor and outdoor settings are still in place. Executive Order No. 189 will be in effect through at least Sunday, February 28, 2021 at 5:00 p.m.

The extension of Executive Order No. 190 allowing for the sale of “to-go” or delivery of mixed beverages will continue to help businesses that are struggling right now. The extension of Executive Order No. 191 will help families have the ability to stay in their homes, a critical component of slowing the spread of the virus.

North Carolina continues to administer Covid-19 vaccines across the state. As of today, 99.8% of all first doses received by the state were reported as being administered and 859,695 total doses have been administered. Vaccine supply continues to be very low and the state is hopeful for more vaccine to be on the way. On a call with Governor Cooper and other governors yesterday, the Biden Administration committed to increase vaccine shipments to the states by 16% over the next 3 weeks.

On Tuesday, NCDHHS expanded its vaccine data dashboard to provide information about vaccine doses allocated to and received by the state and updated guidance to ensure equitable distribution and speed of administration.

North Carolinians can find out when they will be eligible to get their vaccine through a new online tool, Find My Vaccine Group. The screener walks users through a series of questions to determine which vaccine group they fall in. Learn more about North Carolina’s vaccine rollout at YourSpotYourShot.nc.gov.

On January 23, NCDHHS reported the first identified case of B.1.1.7 COVID-19 Variant in North Carolina. Early data suggest that this variant may be more contagious than other variants and state health officials continue to recommend staying at home when possible.

North Dakota:

On January 27, Governor Burgum adjusted the statewide risk level from moderate/yellow to low/green beginning at 8:00 a.m. on January 29. The downward adjustment will permit bars, restaurants, and other food service establishments to increase their occupancy from 65 percent with a 200-patron cap to 80 percent with a cap of 300 patrons. Establishments are still required to observe and enforce social distancing and are encouraged to either require or strongly recommend the use of face coverings. The official statement of the North Dakota State Government announcing the adjustment referenced the recent state report issued by the Whitehouse, noting that “North Dakota ranked lowest among all states for test positivity last week.”

Ohio:

On January 26, Governor DeWine officially announced the new plan for Ohio's 10:00 p.m. to 5:00 a.m. curfew that is contingent on the hospital utilization statewide.

The Ohio Department of Health has recommended that Ohio's curfew be amended to 11:00 p.m. to 5:00 a.m. when COVID-related hospital utilization drops below 3,500 for seven consecutive days. As of today, hospitalizations have been below 3,500 for the past six days. If hospitalizations remain at this level for a seventh consecutive day, Ohio's curfew will be amended on January 28 and will be in effect from 11:00 p.m. to 5:00 a.m. for at least two weeks.

If hospital utilization subsequently drops below 3,000 for seven consecutive days, Ohio's curfew would be amended to 12:00 a.m. to 5:00 a.m. for at least two weeks. If hospitalizations drops below 2,500 for seven consecutive days, the Ohio Department of Health would recommend lifting the curfew.

If, at any point, the number of COVID-related hospitalizations begins to rise, health officials could reinstitute the appropriate curfew measures.

Additionally, Governor DeWine announced that Ohio has been averaging about 146,000 first vaccine doses coming into Ohio every week. As Ohio's Phase 1A begins to wind down, more doses will be available for those in Phase 1B.

Ohio is second in the nation for the number of people vaccinated in nursing homes, however, because not all residents and staff are choosing to receive the vaccine, Ohio will begin directing approximately 77,000 vaccines set aside to use in nursing homes to others in Phase 1A and 1B.

Ohio has put focus on vaccinating members of the public living in congregate settings because these individuals are especially vulnerable to contracting COVID-19. In Ohio's state-run developmental centers, 89 percent of residents have accepted the vaccine; 73 percent of long-term patients in state-run psychiatric hospitals have accepted the vaccine; a total of 92 percent of veterans in state-run veterans’ homes have accepted the vaccine. Of those with developmental disabilities not living in state-run facilities, 5,500 people have been vaccinated so far.

Next week, Ohio will make vaccine available to 91,000 K-12 teachers and school personnel who are necessary to provide in-person education to students. Like other groups eligible in Phase 1B of Ohio's vaccination program, this will be a rolling process beginning with Cincinnati Public Schools which will begin offering vaccinations to their staff later this week.

Due to the scarcity of vaccine, the process will take weeks, but Ohio’s goal is to have all first doses administered by the end of February. To be eligible to receive vaccine, districts had to commit to remaining or returning to in-person learning full-time or in a hybrid model by March 1.

Districts that are eligible to begin receiving vaccines next week should have already received notification, and the rest should be notified of their scheduled dates by the end of the week. Teachers and staff with questions should contact their administrator.

Governor DeWine also announced that, in pursuit of fairness and equity in the distribution of the scarce vaccines, Ohio will be delivering vaccines directly into affordable senior housing locations starting the week of February 8. These senior housing facilities are home to several thousand older Ohioans throughout the state and are often residential clusters with apartment buildings ranging in units from 30 to over 200.

The Ohio Department of Health will be working with local partners to offer assistance through onsite clinics. These clinics will help ease the burden for many seniors having trouble navigating the registration process and arranging transportation.

Rhode Island:

Governor Raimondo issued Executive Order 21-08 on January 27, 2021 that extended the following executive orders until February 25, 2021:

  • Executive Order 20-06 (Fourth Supplemental Emergency Declaration – Expanding Access to Telemedicine Services).
  • Executive Order 20-16 (Thirteenth Supplemental Emergency Declaration – Authorizing Waiver and Medical State Plan Amendments and Adjustments to Essential Provider Rates).
  • Executive Order 20-17 (Fourteenth Supplemental Emergency Declaration – Testing, Critical Supplies and Hospital Capacity Reporting).
  • Executive Order 20-19 (Sixteenth Supplemental Emergency Declaration – Increasing Access to Unemployment Insurance).
  • Executive Order 20-70 (Sixty-Fifth Supplemental Emergency Declaration – Hospital and Community-Based Health Care).
  • Executive Order 20-72 (Sixty-Seventh Supplemental Emergency Declaration – COVID-19 Emergency Regulations).
  • Executive Order 20-94 (Eighty-Ninth Supplemental Emergency Declaration – Continuing to Require Cloth Face Coverings in Public).
  • Executive Order 20-104 (Ninety-Ninth Supplemental Emergency Declaration – Amended Quarantine and Isolation Order).
  • Executive Order 20-110 (One Hundred and Fifth Supplemental Emergency Declaration – Increasing Teaching and Administrative Staff Capacity).

Utah:

On January 27, Governor Cox announced that Utah will receive extra doses of the COVID-19 vaccine. Walgreens and CVS pharmacies reallocated 28,275 additional doses for distribution throughout the state. These doses are in addition to the 8,775 doses received by the state this week, and the 19,500 doses that are scheduled to be delivered to the state next week.

January 26, 2021

Delaware:

On January 26, 2021, Governor John Carney extended a State of Emergency declaration by 30 days to confront community spread of COVID-19. Addressing the distribution of vaccine, Governor Carney announced a partnership with community based organizations to begin expanding access to the COVID-19 vaccine among low-income, underserved seniors. Additionally, the Governor, the Delaware Division of Public Health (DPH), and the Delaware Emergency Management Agency (DEMA) announced a list of community testing sites throughout Delaware this and next week.

Florida:

On January 25, 2021, Governor Ron DeSantis announced that by February 1, 2021, the COVID-19 vaccine will have been offered to every resident and staff member in Florida’s nursing homes and assisted living facilities. The Governor has previously announced the steps the state is taking to prioritize vaccinating those 65 and older.

(Miami-Dade County): The Office of the Mayor issued a news release on January 26, 2021 indicating that the county will release a limited number of COVID-19 vaccine appointments to people 65 and older. Appointments are now available online and over the phone.

Illinois:

The Illinois Department of Public Health (IDPH) announced Region 8 (DuPage and Kane counties) and Region 9 (Lake and McHenry counties) are moving to Tier 1 mitigations. In order to move to Tier 1, a region must meet the following metrics:

  • A test positivity rate between 6.5 and 8% for three consecutive days, as measured by the 7-day rolling average; AND
  • ≥20% available staffed ICU hospital beds for three consecutive days, on a 7-day rolling average; AND
  • No sustained increase in the number of people in the hospital with COVID-19 for seven out of 10 days, on a 7-day average

Tier 1 mitigations are applied to regions experiencing a resurgence of COVID-19. Regions under Tier 1 must adhere to the following restrictions, among others:

  • Indoor service in restaurants and bars is limited to the lesser of 25 guests or 25% capacity per room;
  • Establishments offering indoor service must serve food;
  • Sports and other organized group recreational activities should follow the mitigation measures set forth in the All Sports Policy;
  • Face coverings must be worn at all times in fitness centers;
  • Social events and meetings are limited to the lesser of 25 guests or 25% capacity both indoors and outdoors (not applicable to students participating in-person classroom learning or sports).

Kansas:

On January 25, Governor Laura Kelly announced that county allocation data is now available on Kansas’ COVID-19 vaccine dashboard. A collaboration with the Kansas Department of Health and Environment, the COVID-19 dashboard will be updated Monday, Wednesday and Friday by 12:30 p.m.

As of January 25, Kansas has reported:

  • 132,145 people vaccinated,
  • 157,520 total vaccine doses administered,
  • 255,550 vaccine doses distributed.

Kentucky:

On January 26, Governor Beshear announced that the first two cases of the faster spreading United Kingdom variant of COVID-19 have been confirmed in Kentucky.

Kentucky public health commissioner, Dr. Steven Stack, plans on releasing details of the two confirmed cases on January 27.

Nebraska:

As of December 24, all Nebraska counties are to remain under Directed Health Measures through January 31. In mid-December, Nebraska’s DHHS released updated reopening best practice guidelines for various businesses, such as restaurants and bars, massage therapy and tattoo parlors, and barbers and salons. Most notably, parties utilizing state-wide dine-in services are limited to eight people. All business owners, however, are directed to review Directed Health Measures for their counties, as there may be additional restrictions on occupancy, party limits, and physical distancing at the local level.

On December 7, Governor Pete Ricketts extended Executive Order 20-37. The initial Order, issued on June 17, provided certain waivers and deferrals for specific health professionals through December 31 so that persons directly responding to the COVID-19 state of emergency could obtain or retain the necessary credentials. The extension takes into account that, due to COVID-19, many licensing/credentialing examinations have been postponed, in-person testing capacity has been reduced, online testing options are limited, and exam results are delayed. Under the extension, therefore, provisional credentials will remain active until thirty days after the lifting of the COVID-19 state of emergency or until examination results are obtained, whichever is sooner, provided the eligible healthcare professional has applied for examination and completed the required education and/or training program(s). Along with provisional credentialing, the extension temporarily deferred in-person clinical training, field experiences, and client-contact hours for certain subsets of the healthcare population.

On January 7, Governor Rickets issued Executive Order 21-01 pertaining to the supervision of pharmacy technicians and pharmacist interns. The Order temporarily suspended provisions of Nebraska law that limit the total number of pharmacy technicians and interns that a single pharmacist can supervise at one time. Under normal circumstances, pharmacists are limited to supervision of three technicians/interns. The temporary suspension is intended to increase the number of individuals qualified to administer the COVID-19 vaccine pursuant to PREP Act guidance issued by the U.S. DHHS in October.

Nebraska currently has a program in place titled the Nebraska Accommodation Project (NAP) that provides residents with a ten-day quarantine stay at a hotel, free of charge, provided that they meet the following criteria:

  • They are a resident of Nebraska with a state-issued photo ID;
  • They have been exposed to a COVID-19 positive individual;
  • They lack resources to find or obtain temporary alternate housing; and
  • They have a full-time household member who has been diagnosed with a high-risk medical condition by a medical professional.

To be COVID-19 positive within the meaning of NAP, an individual must have obtained a positive lab result or clinical diagnosis. Exposure is defined as being in an enclosed space with a COVID-19 positive person, less than six feet apart, for more than ten minutes. NAP guests must be able to independently care for themselves, self-monitor by taking their temperature twice daily, and remain in their rooms during the entire stay.

There is an ongoing Facebook LIVE Series that addresses Nebraska’s Department of Health and Human Services vaccination plans. The latest draft of the State of Nebraska COVID-19 Vaccination Plan (NCVP) was published on January 15. The NCVP’s purported purpose is to “assist partners in a shared understanding of pandemic response that includes planning assumptions, roles and responsibilities, ordering and reporting, and mass vaccination tools for local providers to substantially reduce morbidity and mortality from COVID19.” The NCVP further identifies critical populations and prioritizes vaccine recipients as follows:

Phase 1 A

  • Healthcare personnel (hospitals, home health care, pharmacies, EMS, outpatient, public health);

Long-term care facility residents and staff;

Phase 1 B

  • Persons 65 years and older
  • Persons 18 years and older who have certain high-risk medical conditions;
  • First responders;
  • Education sector;
  • Critical Infrastructure;

Phase 1 C

  • Vulnerable populations (for example, those who are disabled or reside in congregate settings).

With regard to Phase 1 A, the NCVP notes that early stages of vaccine supply should go “ONLY to those staff providing direct patient care AND/OR are exposed to infectious materials,” and not to the following groups:

  • Administrative staff;
  • Staff working remotely; or
  • Staff not in direct contact with COVID patients or infectious materials.

Phase 1 B is the subset of workers at highest risk for work-related exposure to COVID-19 because their work-related duties must be performed on-site and involve being within six feet of members of the or coworkers.

During Phase 2, it is anticipated that a large number of vaccine doses will be available to meet the demand of the general population. The number of COVID-19 vaccinations administered in the state of Nebraska are tracked via an online dashboard.

New Hampshire:

On January 25, 2021, the New Hampshire Department of Health and Human Services changed their policy, which originally let non-New Hampshire residents that owned land in New Hampshire sign up for the vaccine. Now, only New Hampshire residents are eligible to receive the vaccine in the state.

On January 22, 2021, Phase 1B scheduling began at 8:00 a.m. and vaccinations started on January 26, 2021. An estimated 300,000 individuals are eligible to receive a COVID-19 vaccination with Phase 1B of the state’s distribution plan. To see if you qualify, visit the New Hampshire COVID-19 Vaccine Phases Website or call 2-1-1. You can also call 2-1-1 if you have questions about the vaccine or the registration process.

New Mexico:

On January 16, the New Mexico Department of Health reiterated that vaccine distribution will occur according to the Vaccine Allocation Plan outlined here. The state is currently in Phase 1B of their COVID-19 vaccine distribution. The groups currently eligible for vaccine are as follows:

  • Hospital Personnel
  • Residents and staff of long-term care facilities
  • Medical first responders
  • Congregate setting workers
  • Persons providing direct medical care and other in-person services
  • Home-based health care and hospice workers
  • People 75 or older
  • People 16 or older that are at risk of COVID-19 complications

New Mexicans who seek to be vaccinated are encouraged to register with the New Mexico Department of Health.

New York:

On January 23, Governor Cuomo announced that New York is expanding the deployment of community vaccination kits to further strengthen fairness and equity in the vaccination distribution process. New York will deploy vaccination kits to all NYCHA Senior Housing Developments to provide access to all eligible senior residents.

Additionally, Governor Cuomo signed Executive Order 202.91 providing directives for who should receive the vaccine. Local health departments and county governments must prioritize essential workers in the 1b category. Hospitals must prioritize healthcare workers for vaccinations and pharmacies are required to prioritize individuals older than 65. Additionally, NYSDOH approved general population vaccination sites are required to prioritize individuals over the age of 65.

North Dakota:

The vaccine priority groups were updated as of December 31 and, as of January 15, remained in effect. Frontline healthcare workers, first responders, and long-term care residents and staff were immunized in Phase 1A. Subsequent phases in North Dakota’s vaccine distribution plan are as follows, in order of priority:

Phase 1B

  • Persons age 75 and older;
  • Persons age 65-74 with two or more high-risk medical conditions;
  • Staff and residents in other congregate settings, such as corrections, group homes, treatment centers, and homeless shelters;
  • Persons age 65 and older with one or more high-risk medical conditions;
  • Persons age 65 and older with or without high-risk medical conditions;
  • Persons with two or more high-risk medical conditions regardless of age;
  • Child care workers; and
  • Workers employed by preschools or K-12 educational institutions, including teachers, nutritional service staff, aides, bus drivers, principals, administrative staff, and custodians.

Phase 1C

  • North Dakota National Guard;
  • Grocery Workers;
  • Public safety answering points (911 dispatchers);
  • Manufacturing related to the development or supply of the COVID-19 vaccine;
  • Other healthcare and public health workers not included in Phase 1A;
  • Free standing clinical laundries;
  • Public transit workers, including bus, taxi, and ride-share drivers;
  • Persons age 16-64 with one or more high-risk medical conditions;
  • Blood bank workers not previously vaccinated;
  • Information technology personnel; and
  • All other essential workers per Cybersecurity and Infrastructure Security Agency (CISA).

The state is expected to enter Phase 1B in mid-January. Following administration of the vaccine to persons in Phase 1C, the state will begin Phase 2, which includes the general public. North Dakota residents are encouraged to utilize the recently unveiled Vaccine Locator to obtain local information about vaccine availability. For information on the vaccine doses administered and weekly vaccine coverage rates for North Dakota, visit the state’s COVID-19 Vaccine Dashboard. The state also maintains a list of free COVID-19 testing sites.

An updated version of North Dakota’s “Smart Restart” plan was released on January 7. The plan reveals a color-coded health guidance system and coinciding health criteria and health indicator measures based on the number of cases reported, positivity rates, and testing capacity.

Tennessee:

On January 22, 2021, Tennessee added people living in households with medically fragile children to Phase 1c of the state’s COVID-19 Vaccination Plan. Phase 1c also includes people age 16 and older who have medical conditions that put them at high risk of severe illness and death from COVID-19. This group is further defined in the updated plan and occurs earlier in Tennessee’s plan than in federal vaccination recommendations. Tennessee correctional officers and jailers have been added to Phase 1a1 of Tennessee’s COVID-19 Vaccination Plan.

January 25, 2021

California:

On January 25, the CDPH announced that they are lifting the Regional Stay at Home Order enacted on December 3, 2020. This action comes after the projected ICU availability rose above 15% in all regions. Upon the expiration of the Regional Stay at Home Order, counties will return to their assigned tiers under the Blueprint for a Safer Economy.

Additionally, Governor Newsom announced several improvements to the state’s vaccination plan. The improvements are aimed at making it easier for people to know when that are eligible for vaccination, accelerating the administration of vaccinations, and improving vaccination data.

The state will continue to issue vaccines to individuals 65+ and health care workers and will prioritize emergency services workers, food and agriculture workers, teachers, and school staff. Once the state can expand distribution of the vaccine, the state will transition to an age-based eligibility system with a specific focus on communities that have been disproportionately impacted by COVID -19.

On January 21, Governor Newsom signed Executive Order N-01-21 effective January 21, 2021. The order extends the validity of medical cannabis identification cards that would have otherwise expired on or after March 4, 2020, citing the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic.

January 12, the CDPH expanded vaccine eligibility to include Seniors 65+. However, those individuals slated to receive the vaccine in Phase 1A—namely, health care workers and long-term care residents—remain the highest priority at this time. While demand for the vaccine continues to exceed supply, Governor Newsom has announced a new notification system set to roll out next week. The new system will notify people eligible to receive the vaccine, and if not yet eligible, will allow for them to register for a notification via email or text when they become eligible.

District of Columbia:

On January 21, Mayor Bowser announced that beginning on January 22, restaurants can allow indoor dining at 25% capacity or no more than 250 people, whichever is fewer people. Additionally, museums can open, but may allow no more than 250 people per floor and may not conduct guided tours.

On January 25, Mayor Bowser delivered the Coronavirus Situational Report, reporting that as of January 23, 51,421 doses of vaccine had already been administered in Washington, D.C. and that 9,475 doses of vaccine are becoming available this week.

Florida:

The Florida Department of Health issued a Public Health Advisory which recommends that vaccine providers ensure the recipient of a COVID-19 vaccine is a resident of Florida under Fla. Stat. § 381.968(5)(b), or is present in Florida for the purpose of providing health care services involving direct contact with patients, prior to administering a vaccine dose.

(Miami-Dade County): Mayor Daniella Levine Cava issued an Executive Order which requires hospital systems, municipalities that receive vaccines, or other entities that distribute vaccines, to report vaccine related information specific to Miami-Dade County—including total doses on hand, sources, administration sites, total vaccines administered, appointments available, and the demographics of those vaccinated, among other things—to the County. Hospitals systems and other entities that dispense vaccines should not provide vaccination appointments unless they have received vaccine doses and have a reasonably accurate forecast of the number of persons who can be vaccinated with the supply. The order takes effect on Saturday, January 23, 2021, and expires with the expiration of the County state of local emergency.

(Miami-Dade County): Mayor Daniella Levine Cava issued an Executive Order further extending the state of local emergency for an additional 7-day period, beginning on January 21, 2021.

(Broward County): County Administrator, Bertha Henry, issued a Declaration of Emergency, further extending the local State of Emergency for 7 days, starting at 9:00 a.m. on January 26, 2021.

(Palm Beach County): County Administrator, Verdenia Baker, issued Emergency Order No. 2021-001, which extends Emergency Order 2020-012 (requiring the use of facial coverings in all businesses, establishments, and public spaces), until 12:01 a.m. on February 19, 2021. Mayor Kerner also issued a Declaration of Continuing State of Emergency further extending the state of local emergency through January 29, 2021.

Hawaii:

(Maui County): With Governor Ige’s approval, Mayor Victorino issued Amended Public Health Emergency Rules, which clarify that face coverings must be worn while walking to and from the pool or beach area, and may only be removed once the person is stationary and adequately separated from non-household members. The rule also adds gas stations to the list of facilities to which face coverings are required, and to which the Maui County exception does not apply. Unless a more specific limit applies, essential or designated retail businesses must limit total occupancy to 30% of the maximum occupancy. Businesses or designated operations are required to refuse entry to persons not wearing face coverings, unless an exception applies, and failure to enforce the Rules may be subject to enforcement including fines and mandatory closure. The order further amends the self-quarantine period for travelers to 10 days, consistent with Governor Ige’s Seventeenth Emergency Proclamation. The Rules further detail the requirements for travelers who wish to enter the county, including the requirement that they be registered on an exposure notification system. The rules take effect on January 19, 2021.

Illinois:

The Illinois Department of Public Health (IDPH) announced that Region 6 (encompassing Champaign, Clark, Clay, Coles, Crawford, Cumberland, De Witt, Douglas, Edgar, Effingham, Fayette, Ford, Iroquois, Jasper, Lawrence, Macon, Moultrie, Piatt, Richland, Shelby, and Vermillion) is returning to Phase 4 of the state’s restore plan. In order to move to Phase 4, a region must meet the following metrics:

  • A test positivity rate less ≤6.5 percent for three consecutive days, as measured by the 7-day rolling average; AND
  • ≥20 percent available staffed ICU hospital beds for three consecutive days, on a 7-day rolling average; AND
  • No sustained increase in the number of people in the hospital with COVID-19 for seven out of 10 days, on a 7-day average.

Phase 4 is the revitalization stage of the Restore Illinois plan. Regions under Phase 4 may reopen select indoor recreation facilities to operate at either 50 customers or 50% of facility capacity, whichever is lower, meetings and social events are restricted to 50 people or less, indoor dining and drinking is permitted, and all manufacturing is open with IDPH approved safety guidance.

IDPH also announced that Region 7 (Kankakee and Will) is advancing to Tier 1. In order to move to Tier 1 mitigations, a region must meet the following metrics:

  • A test positivity rate between 6.5 and 8% for three consecutive days, as measured by the 7-day rolling average; AND
  • ≥20% available staffed ICU hospital beds for three consecutive days, on a 7-day rolling average; AND
  • No sustained increase in the number of people in the hospital with COVID-19 for seven out of 10 days, on a 7-day average

Tier 1 mitigations are applied to regions experiencing a resurgence of COVID-19. Regions under Tier 1 must adhere to the following mitigations, among others:

  • Bars and restaurants must close at 11:00 p.m. and may reopen no earlier than 6am the following day
  • Indoor service is limited to the lesser of 25 guests or 25% capacity
  • Establishments offering indoor service must serve food
  • Meetings and social events are limited to the lesser of 25 guests or 25% capacity both indoors and outdoors (not applicable to students participating in in-person classroom learning or sports)
  • Sports and other organized group recreational activities should follow the mitigation measures set forth in the All Sport Guidelines
  • Face coverings must be worn at all times in fitness centers

On January 22, the Illinois Department of Public Health (IDPH) announced that Region 4 (encompassing Bond, Clinton, Madison, Monroe, Randolph, St. Clair, and Washington counties) is moving to Tier 2 mitigations. In order to move to Tier 2 mitigations, a region must meet the following metrics:

  • Test positivity rate ≥ 8% and below 12% for three consecutive days (7-day average); AND
  • Staffed ICU bed availability ≥ 20% for three consecutive days (7-day average); AND
  • Sustained decline in COVID patients in hospital (7-day average for 7 of 10 days)

Tier 2 mitigations are applied to regions experiencing a resurgence of COVID-19. Notable restrictions under the Tier 2 Mitigation Measures include:

  • No indoor service or dining at bars or restaurants
  • Meetings, social events and gatherings, both indoor and outdoor, are limited to 10 guests

The Illinois Department of Public Health (IDPH) announced that Region 10 (suburban Cook county) and Region 11 (city of Chicago) are moving to Tier 1 mitigations. In order to move into Tier 1 mitigations, a region must meet the following metrics:

  • Test positivity rate between 6.5% and 8% for three consecutive days (7-day average); AND
  • Staffed ICU bed availability ≥ 20% for three consecutive days (7-day average); AND
  • No sustained increase in COVID patients in hospital (7-day average for 7 of 10 days)

Tier 1 mitigations are applied to regions experiencing a resurgence of COVID-19. Notable restrictions under Tier 1 Mitigation Measures include:

  • Bars and restaurants must close at 11:00 p.m. and may reopen no earlier than 6am the following day
  • Indoor service is limited to the lesser of 25 guests or 25% capacity
  • Establishments offering indoor service must serve food
  • Meetings and social events are limited to the lesser of 25 guests or 25% capacity both indoors and outdoors (not applicable to students participating in in-person classroom learning or sports)
  • Sports and other organized group recreational activities should follow the mitigation measures set forth in the All Sport Guidelines
  • Face coverings must be worn at all times in fitness centers

On January 25, the Illinois Department of Public Health (IDPH) announced that Region 1 (Boone, Carroll, DeKalb, Jo Daviess, Lee, Ogle, Stephenson, Whiteside, and Winnebago counties) and Region 2 (Bureau, Fulton, Grundy, Henderson, Henry, Warren, and Woodford counties) are moving to Phase 4 of the Restore Illinois Plan. In order to move into Phase 4, a region must meet the following metrics:

  • A test positivity rate less ≤6.5 percent for three consecutive days, as measured by the 7-day rolling average; AND
  • ≥20 percent available staffed ICU hospital beds for three consecutive days, on a 7-day rolling average; AND
  • No sustained increase in the number of people in the hospital with COVID-19 for seven out of 10 days, on a 7-day average.

Phase 4 is the revitalization stage of the Restore Illinois plan. Notably, in returning to Phase 4, Regions 1 and 2 will see gatherings of 50 people or fewer allowed. Additionally, various businesses will see the easing of restrictions as follows:

  • Manufacturing: All manufacturing open with IDPH approved safety guidance.
  • “Non-essential” businesses: All employees return to work with IDPH approved safety guidance; Employers are encouraged to provide accommodations for COVID-19-vulnerable employees.
  • Bars and restaurants: Open with capacity limits and IDPH approved safety guidance.
  • Personal care services and health clubs: All barbershops, salons, spas and health and fitness clubs open with capacity limits and IDPH approved safety guidance.
  • Entertainment: Cinema and theaters open with capacity limits and IDPH approved safety guidance.
  • Retail: Open with capacity limits and IDPH approved safety guidance.

Illinois and Chicago enter the next phase of their vaccination plans, Phase 1B. Phase 1B includes persons aged 65 years and older, frontline essential workers, and inmates. Essential workers include:

  • First Responders - Fire, law enforcement, 911 workers, security personnel, school officers
  • Education – Teachers, principals, student support, student aids, day care workers
  • Food and Agriculture – Processing, plants, veterinary health, livestock services, animal care
  • Manufacturing – Industrial production of good for distribution to retail, wholesale or other manufactures
  • Corrections Workers and Inmates – Prison/jail officers, juvenile facility staff, workers providing in person support, inmates
  • United State Postal Services Workers
  • Public Transit Workers – Flight crew, bus drivers, train conductors, taxi drivers, paratransit drivers, in person support, ride sharing services
  • Grocery Store Workers – Baggers, cashiers, stockers, pick-up, customer service
  • Shelters/Adult Day Care – Homeless shelter, women's shelter, adult day/drop-in program, sheltered workshop, psycho social rehab

(Chicago): Chicago Mayor Lori Lightfoot and the Chicago Department of Public Health announced new initiatives to address racial equity in the COVID-19 vaccine distribution as Chicago moves into Phase 1B. The plan includes 3 main strategies:

  • Target 15 high-need communities based on the City’s COVID vulnerability index;
  • Partner with community stakeholders to push vaccines and the City resources directly to these communities;
  • Work with community stakeholders to identify settings and groups where vaccine access will most quickly decrease COVID transmission risk and remove barriers to vaccinating these individuals as quickly as possible.

Indiana:

Governor Holcomb signed Executive Order 21-01, the second extension of Executive Order 20-50. Effective at 12:01 a.m. on January 25, 2021, Executive Order 20-50 – which lays out the county-based measures and restrictions based on the impact and spread of the coronavirus disease – will be extended and remain in effect until January 31, 2021. However, the extension is subject to the following modifications:

  • Hospitals are directed to implement evidenced-based criteria to ensure sufficient capacity to care for all patients and should reprioritize or postpone non-emergent surgeries or procedures.
  • Counties, political subdivisions, local government entities, or school corporation may impose more stringent requirements, but not less stringent requirements.

Iowa:

On January 22, Governor Reynolds announced the reallocation of $17 million in relief funds that have been made available to local governments for direct expenses incurred in response to COVID-19. The funds will now be allocated at the county level, rather than the city level to simplify the administration of distribution. Counties do not need to reapply for funds as a result of the reallocation. The new allocation of funds by county can be found here.

Additionally, Iowa Department of Public Health (“IDPH”) has announced that Phase 1B of COVID-19 vaccinations will begin on February 1, 2021. Due to the short supply of vaccines, IDPH has implemented a tiered prioritization of Phase 1B populations. Phase 1B vaccinations will be given to persons aged 65 years or older (who may receive the vaccine without regard to whether they belong to any tier) and certain high-risk persons in the following order:

  • Tier 1: first responders (including firefighters police officer, and child welfare social workers), PK-12 staff, and early education and childcare workers
  • Tier 2: frontline essential workers in food, agriculture, distribution, and manufacturing sectors who live or work in non-social distanced settings, and individuals with disabilities living in home settings and their direct care staff
  • Tier 3: staff and individuals living in congregate settings not covered by a previous Phase or Tier (excepting college dormitories), and government officials and staff engaged in business at the State Capitol
  • Tier 4: inspectors responsible for health, life, and safety
  • Tier 5: correctional facility staff and incarcerated individuals

Kansas:

On January 25, Governor Kelly signed Senate Bill 14 into law, extending the State of Disaster Emergency Declaration to March 31, 2021, and allowing for the continuation of certain resources, support, and regulations critical to Kansas’ COVID-19 response efforts.

Among other resources and support, the disaster declaration allows Kansas to provide community-based COVID-19 testing, provide support to food banks and pantries, and provide hospitals and first responders with Personal Protective Equipment.

Though there are a number of COVID-19 response measures contained in SB 14, the key provision extends the current emergency declaration to March 31, 2021, providing a measure of stability and certainty for the state’s ongoing emergency response efforts.

The bill also contains the provisions of a number of executive orders that the Governor has issued during the pandemic, such as allowing establishments to continue the sale of alcoholic beverages for carryout consumption, expanding the ability of physicians to use telemedicine, and providing for temporary suspension of certain healthcare professional licensing and practice requirements.

(Dodge City): On January 21, officials in Dodge City announced they have rescinded their mask ordinance, saying it was effective at lowering the rate of new COVID-19 cases.

Kentucky:

On January 25, Governor Beshear announced that 1,268 new virus cases have been reported statewide, the lowest in the past 4 weeks. The Governor was cautious warning that Monday case numbers are typically lower.

The Governor also announced that last week, the state vaccinated 82,511 people, which is the new record for the most Kentuckians vaccinated in one week. The Governor cautioned that demand is still outpacing supply in Kentucky.

Louisiana:

On January 22, the Louisiana Department of Public Health released a testing schedule for sites operated by the Louisiana National Guard. Individuals are encouraged to pre-register.

Furthermore, Governor Edwards announced that the state has launched the app Covid Defense which allows users to receive notifications informing them if there is a risk they were exposed to someone who has tested positive for the virus. The app can be downloaded on Android or Apple.

On January 25, the Louisiana Department of Public Health announced that 324 vaccine providers will receive COVID vaccinations the week of January 25-January 31.

Maryland:

On January 21, Governor Hogan and the State Superintendent of Schools called for all Maryland school systems to return to hybrid instruction to include a combination of in-person and virtual learning, no later than March 1. State health officials have provided school systems with additional school reopening school guidance and educational design options based on scientific evidence, recent studies on the impact of school reopening on community transmission, and the effects of school closures on children and learning. State health officials recommend daily in-person learning for students with disabilities and special learning needs, phased daily in-person learning for elementary students, and hybrid learning for secondary students.

On January 25, Governor Hogan announced an additional $20.7 million in education relief funding for education as school systems work to get students safely back into classrooms. The funding includes $10 million in Competitive Innovation Grants, $7.4 million in Community College Workforce Development Programs, $2.6 million to independent colleges, and over $700,000 to schools for the blind and deaf.

Michigan:

Director Gordon, of the Michigan Department of Health and Human Services, signed an updated Gatherings and Face Mask Order, effective February 1, 2021. The order, which will remain in effect until February 21, 2021, has the following restrictions:

  • Indoor gatherings can have no more than 10 people from no more than 2 households;
  • Outdoor gatherings at residential venues can have no more than 25 people from no more than 3 households; outdoor gatherings at non-residential venues are limited based on the amount of fixed seating and capacity of the venue;
  • Gatherings at entertainment facilities, recreational facilities, and food service establishments are subject to further restriction;
  • Retail stores, libraries, and museums cannot exceed 30% of total occupancy limits; exercise facilities cannot exceed 25% of the total occupancy limits;
  • Schools, colleges, technical schools, and universities are allowed to hold in-person classes and other events sponsored by the educational institution, except for extracurricular activities that involve physical contact and where masks cannot be worn;
  • Organized sports are prohibited unless all participants, teams, and venues comply with the enhanced testing regimen specified in the Testing and Additional Mitigation Measures for Athletic Practice and Play During Statewide Athletics ‘Pause’ section of MDHHS’s document entitled Interim Guidance for Athletics;
  • All persons participating in gatherings are required to wear a face mask, unless an exception applies;
  • Certain facilities and businesses are prohibited from operating unless the facility maintains accurate contact-tracing records, including date and time of entry, names of patron, and contact information.

New Hampshire:

On January 22, Governor Sununu issued Executive Order 2021-1 extending the State of Emergency declared in Executive Order 2020-04 and Emergency Order #83 regarding temporary provisions to respond to timing challenges related to the enactment of Senate Bill 2 in the 2021 Legislative Session, as part of the state’s efforts to combat COVID-19.

North Carolina:

On January 23, North Carolina health officials confirmed that the new strain of COVID-19 has been detected in the state -- specifically, in Mecklenburg County. The new strain, called B.1.1.7, was first detected in the United Kingdom in December. According to NCDHHS, there are 195 cases of B.1.1.7 in the US in 21 states as of Friday.

Health officials said early data suggest that this new strain may be more contagious than the first strain of coronavirus. Current COVID-19 vaccines are expected to be effective against the new strain.

Ohio:

On January 21, Governor DeWine discussed the vaccine distribution for Phase 1B, which began this week for those ages 80 and up. Beginning next week, vaccinations are anticipated to begin for those ages 75 and up. Vaccinations will also be available to those with severe congenital, developmental, or early-onset medical disorders, and who have a developmental or intellectual disability.

A representative from the local county developmental disabilities board will reach out to help coordinate receipt of the vaccination for Ohioans with severe congenital, developmental, or early-onset medical disorders, as well as a developmental or intellectual disability.

Governor DeWine also announced that the state is purchasing 2 million at-home, rapid COVID-19 test using telehealth services where the results are delivered in minutes without the need to send the test to a lab for processing. Developed by Abbott, BinaxNOW is an easy-to-use antigen test that detects the virus when people are most infectious.

To facilitate the delivery of the BinaxNOW test to the home and the guided collection and testing process, Abbott has partnered with digital health solutions provider eMed™, who will deliver people their results through Abbott’s complementary NAVICA™ app in a matter of minutes. eMed™ will report the rapid test results in the electronic lab reporting system.

Furthermore, Governor DeWine announced that the Ohio Department of Health will extend Ohio's 10:00 p.m. to 5:00 a.m. curfew. Additional details will be forthcoming. The curfew does not apply to those going to and from work, those who have an emergency, or those who need medical care. The curfew is not intended to stop anyone from getting groceries or going to the pharmacy. Picking up carry-out or a drive-thru meal and ordering for delivery is permitted, but serving food and drink within an establishment must cease at 10:00 p.m.

On January 22, Governor DeWine also signed an Executive Order reinstating funding to schools, colleges and universities, as they are returning to in-person learning.

South Carolina:

Governor McMaster issued Executive Order 2021–07 on January 22. Effective immediately until February 6, this Executive Order continues the State of Emergency for 15 days and declares that Executive Order No. 2020–73 (Modifying Amending Emergency Measures) is extended for the duration of the State of Emergency. First responders and 911 operators are still allowed to ask individuals requesting assistance whether they have been exposed to COVID-19. All transportation waivers for commercial vehicles and operators of commercial vehicles are still in effect.

Tennessee:

On January 19, Governor Lee signed Executive Order 74, which encouraged Tennesseans to work from home when possible, encouraged places of worship, weddings, and funerals to continue to use virtual or online services, gave local education agencies the authority to permit school sponsored sporting events and activities as long as they are conducted in a manner consistent with COVID-19 related guidance and rules adopted by the Tennessee Secondary Schools Athletic Association, with respect to school-sponsored and other youth athletics, schools, organizers, and facilities shall not permit spectators to attend practices, games, or competition, but spectators may be present in the facility. Collegiate and professional sporting events must follow the rules of their respective institutions and governing bodies.

Texas:

On January 20, Governor Abbott announced that the Texas Division of Emergency Management has established a new COVID-19 therapeutic infusion center in Lubbock. The infusion center will begin accepting patients Thursday and has been provided with Regeneron's monoclonal antibodies and Bamlanivimab to treat outpatient cases of COVID-19 who meet certain criteria and who have a referral from a hospital or doctor. Previous infusion centers have been established in El Paso, Laredo, Harlingen, Austin, Fort Worth, Irving and more to help communities combat COVID-19 and reduce hospitalizations.

Vermont:

On January 22, the Vermont Department of Public Health announced the launch of a new web page where Vermonters age 75 and older will be able to book an appointment for their COVID-19 vaccine, starting Monday, Jan 25.

Washington:

The Washington State Department of Health announced that none of the eight regions were eligible to move to Phase 2 as part of Governor Inslee’s Roadmap to Recovery plan for the week of January 25, 2021. The regions will be reassessed each Friday and must show a decrease in per-capita COVID-19 case rates, per-capita COVID-19 hospitalizations, occupancy of ICU beds, and COVID-19 test positivity rates.

Wisconsin:

The Wisconsin Department of Health Services announced starting January 25, 2021 adults over the age of 65 will be eligible for COVID-19 vaccinations. Eligible adults can receive the vaccine through their health care provider. At this time, other vaccine eligible populations include frontline health care personnel, residents in skilled nursing and long-term care facilities, police and fire personnel, and correctional staff. The approximate population of 65 and older Wisconsinites is 700,000. Wisconsin currently receives roughly 70,000 first-dose vaccines per week from the federal government.

Wyoming:

On January 2, Wyoming’s State Health Officer Alexia Harrist extended Governor Gordon’s mandatory face coverings initially set to expire today. The new orders are effective through February 14, 2021. The health order continues to require that face coverings be worn in various settings, including businesses, state buildings, and healthcare facilities. Additionally, the requirement covers individuals waiting for or riding public transportation, including ride share services, and the drivers of these services. Previous orders addressing restaurants, schools, gymnasiums, personal service businesses, and statewide gatherings are also now set expire on February 14, 2021.

January 21, 2021

Kansas:

Governor Laura Kelly announced the statewide move to Phase 2 of Kansas’ COVID-19 vaccination plan. With this move, all those aged 65+, those in eligible congregate settings, and all high-contact critical workers will now be prioritized for vaccination, in addition to anyone from Phase 1 who has not yet been vaccinated.

Approximately 1 million Kansans are in Phase 2 but the next weekly supply of vaccine from the federal government contains approximately 45,000 new first doses so not everyone in Phase 2 will be able to receive their vaccine immediately. Each county, through local health departments, will decide how their limited supply of the doses will be allocated by population groups.

Critically, to drive transparency, a vaccine dashboard is available that includes key metrics that will be updated three times a week. In addition to the dashboard, in the coming weeks, the State of Kansas will launch a “Find my Vaccine” mapping tool, so Kansans can locate sites that are offering vaccine administration in their communities.

Governor Kelly and the Kansas Department of Health and Environment (KDHE) ask for your patience while federal supply remains low and for those in prioritized populations to contact their local health departments to learn more about when they will begin to inoculate Phase 2 populations and how they will prioritize within that group or anyone remaining in Phase 1 who has not received the vaccine.

To assist vaccine distribution efforts, Governor Kelly also announced the appointment of Marci Nielsen, PhD, MPH to Chief Advisor for COVID-19 Coordination and Seth Konkel to the role of Special Advisor for COVID-19 Vaccination.

Phase 2 Guidelines:

  • Persons aged 65 and older
  • High-contact critical workers necessary to maintain systems, assets, and activities that are vital to the state security, the economy or public health, or who interact with large numbers of contacts and job-related COVID-19 exposure. COVID-19 risk is associated with the likelihood of infecting oneself or spreading the virus. Factors that increase risk include proximity, type of contact, duration of contacts and challenges to implement protective measures. This includes:
    • Firefighters, police officers, first responders, and correction officers
    • Grocery store workers and food services
    • K-12 and childcare workers, including teachers, custodians, drivers, & other staff
    • Food processing, including meat processing plants
    • Large-scale aviation manufacturing plants
    • Transportation workers
    • Workers in retail, agriculture, supply of critical services or materials for COVID-19 response, the U.S. Postal Service, and Department of motor vehicles
  • Those living or working in licensed congregate settings and other special care or congregate environments where social distancing is not possible, including:
    • Homeless shelters
    • Congregate childcare institutions
    • Emergency shelters or safe houses
    • Corrections facilities
    • Behavioral health institutions

As of January 20, Kansas has:

  • Vaccinated 111,905 people,
  • Administered 129,349 total vaccine doses,
  • Distributed 202,225 vaccine doses.

Maine:

On January 19, 2021, Governor Mills signed a proclamation extending Maine’s state of civil emergency through February 17, 2021.

Maryland:

On January 21, Governor Hogan ordered a renewal of the State of Emergency due to COVID-19 which was initially implemented on March 5, 2020.

New Hampshire:

On January 19, 2021, Governor Sununu announced that New Hampshire is moving into Phase 1B of New Hampshire’s COVID-19 Vaccine Distribution Plan. Phase 1B includes (1) residents who are medically vulnerable at significant risk – including family caregivers for those under 16; (2) residents with developmental disabilities that receive services in a congregate residential setting, as well as staff in those settings; (3) Corrections officers and staff; and (4) Populations that experience health disparities. Importantly, Phase 1B also includes residents age 65 and older. Originally, Phase 1B included residents age 75 and older. However, last week Governor Sununu extended this population to include people age 65 and older according to recent federal guidance.

Residents can register for vaccine appointments here.

Ohio:

On January 21, Governor Mike DeWine will extend the state’s 10 p.m. curfew rather than allowing it to expire Saturday. The state’s COVID-19 numbers are too high — and its vaccination campaign in too early a stage — to relax it. Governor DeWine enacted the state’s original COVID-19 curfew, which asks most Ohioans to stay home between 10 p.m. and 5 a.m., on Nov. 19 and renewed it the following month.

The order has broad exemptions: Most retail businesses are required to close at 10, but grocery stores and pharmacies can stay open; restaurants and bars must stop dine-in service at 10 but can continue to offer pick-up and drive-thru services; Ohioans traveling to or from work are free to do so.

At the time he enacted the curfew, Governor DeWine said he hoped it would give law enforcement the power to disband dangerous gatherings without unduly inconveniencing people in the state.

Rhode Island:

Governor Raimondo issued Executive Order 21-07 on January 20, 2021 that amends the following parts of Executive Order 20-108 until February 18, 2021:

  • Moderate and lower risk sports may resume practices, competitions, scrimmages and games. Higher risk sports (wrestling and boxing, for example) are still prohibited.
  • All sports teams and groups are prohibited from participating in tournaments, matches, games, competitions, practices, etc. with out-of-state teams or groups, except for professional and intercollegiate athletic programs.

Texas:

On January 20, Governor Abbott announced that the Texas Division of Emergency Management has established a new COVID-19 therapeutic infusion center in Lubbock. The infusion center will begin accepting patients Thursday and has been provided with Regeneron's monoclonal antibodies and Bamlanivimab to treat outpatient cases of COVID-19 who meet certain criteria and who have a referral from a hospital or doctor. Previous infusion centers have been established in El Paso, Laredo, Harlingen, Austin, Fort Worth, Irving and more to help communities combat COVID-19 and reduce hospitalizations.

Utah:

On January 21, 2021, Governor Cox gave on update on Utah’s coronavirus vaccine plan. The COVID-19 vaccines are currently available for healthcare workers, long-term care facility staff and residents, first responders, and K-12 teachers and school staff. As of January 21, 2021, Utah has administered the COVID-19 vaccines in the following amounts to the members of those groups:

  • 97% of vaccine doses allocated to local health departments;
  • 96% of vaccine doses allocated to hospitals;
  • 100% of vaccine doses allocated to community nursing services;
  • 83% of vaccine doses allocated to “other” groups;
  • 43% of vaccine doses allocated through the Federal Pharmacy Partnership.

Washington:

The City of Seattle has opened applications for certain low-income workers in the hospitality industry who live and work in Seattle and have been affected by the COVID-19 pandemic to receive a one-time cash payment. Applications are open until February 1, 2021.

West Virginia:

On January 21, 2020, Governor Justice announced that beginning January 25, 2021 at 8:00 a.m., West Virginia will launch a new online vaccination scheduling and distribution communication tool that will notify residents about the availability of vaccine doses to help streamline COVID-19 vaccination efforts statewide. The tool is through a company call Everbridge and can be accessed through West Virginia’s vaccination hub. On January 25, 2021, all West Virginians age 65 and older can access the tool and input their information so they can be notified about the availability of vaccines.

Governor Justice also announced that 15 new community vaccination clinics will be held January 22, and 23, 2021 specifically to vaccinate frontline healthcare workers across West Virginia. The vaccine doses are available to all frontline healthcare workers, including those in fields such as behavioral health, dentists, physical and occupational therapists, hospice and home health workers, and EMS and CPS workers.

Also, on January 21, 2021, Governor Justice announced that the state’s community vaccination clinic model for vaccinating all residents aged 65 and older will be expanded to serve all 55 counties in West Virginia by February 1, 2021. At present, these clinics are open in 14 counties.

January 20, 2021

Alaska:

The Outbreak Health Orders first issued in November of 2020 have been renewed in full by Governor Dunleavy, the Alaska Department of Health and Social Services, and the Chief Medical Officer of Alaska. All eight Orders are in effect until rescinded.

Outbreak Health Order 1 suspends sections of the Alaska Administrative Code and sections of Alaska Statutes to allow all state agencies to be able to administer their programs in a manner that best meets the needs of the state during the COVID-19 emergency.

Outbreak Health Order 2 allows oversight boards who regulate certain healthcare providers in Alaska under AS 08 the ability to respond to COVID-19 practice issues in a more flexible manner by permitting courtesy licenses, telemedicine, and telehealth.

Outbreak Health Order 3 allows shareholder meetings to occur virtually and allows for businesses to take place in a socially-distanced manner to help mitigate the spread of COVID-19.

Outbreak Health Order 4 requires the state to implement a temporary quarantine and isolation program utilizing non-congregate shelter solutions and provides FEMA reimbursement eligibility for temporary sheltering and quarantine.

Outbreak Health Order 5 provides guidance for critical infrastructure businesses operating in the state.

Outbreak Health Order 6 provides requirements to travelers entering Alaska from outside Alaska.

Outbreak Health Order 7 permits online ticket sales for raffles, lotteries, and other contests so that proceeds from these contests may benefit charities in Alaska.

Outbreak Health Order 8 provides guidance and requirements for travel between communities located off the Road System or the Alaska Marine Highway System.

Arkansas:

Arkansas has progressed into the first tier of Phase 1-B of its coronavirus vaccination distribution. This tier of Phase 1-B includes: those aged 70+ and education workers (including K-12, childcare, and higher education). The next tier in Phase 1-B includes food/agricultural workers, first responders, correctional staff, manufacturing workers, grocery store workers, public transit workers, U.S. Postal Service workers, and essential government/community workers. Vaccinations for Phase 1-A are continuing.

Connecticut:

Governor Lamont announced that the state will proceed with Phase 1b vaccinations in a tiered rollout, with different groups able to schedule their vaccinations in February or March, depending on the prioritization of specific groups.

At Lamont’s direction, State of Connecticut Department of Public Health has begun accepting appointments to vaccinate those individuals over the age of 75. However, it will not start taking vaccination appointments for those between the age of 65 and 75 until early February. After that, the state anticipates accepting reservations for frontline essential workers and individuals below 65 with underlying medical issues in early March.

The state also intends to vaccinate staff and residents of congregate living settings but has not yet said how those grounds will be incorporated into the tiered approach.

District of Columbia:

On January 19, DC Health announced that beginning the week of January 25, in-person staff, including teachers and support staff, at DC Public Schools (DCPS) and DC Public Charter Schools will begin receiving the COVID-19 vaccine.

Indiana:

Governor Holcomb and health officials outlined their vaccine roll out plan on January 6. On January 8, the plan – which prioritizes Hoosiers by age group – was available for Hoosiers 80-years-old and older. On January 13, the Indiana Department of Health announced it was expanding registration to Hoosiers 70 and holder. The state plans to eventually expand registration to residents 60 and older. Vaccines have been available to first responders, law enforcement and similar, long-term care facility residents and health care workers since the implementation as well.

Kentucky:

On January 19, Governor Beshear announced Kentucky hospitals will receive an additional $800 million to $1 billion annually to help advance the quality of care of Medicaid members and provide a stable base for hospitals that will extend beyond the financial challenges of the COVID-19 pandemic.

The Governor said the Kentucky Cabinet for Health and Family Services (CHFS) received approval January 14 from the U.S. Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) on a new directed payment initiative that increases inpatient Medicaid payments for Kentucky hospitals. Pending Kentucky General Assembly legislative approval and federal approval of details plans, payments could begin in March.

In order to receive these funds, hospitals will have to abide by higher quality standards that will be developed in collaboration with CHFS and the Kentucky Hospital Association (KHA).

Louisiana:

On January 19, the Louisiana Department of Health told health providers Tuesday to stop limiting vaccinations to their own patients, warning they could lose out on future allocations of the vaccine or face penalties if they do not make the shots available to anyone who meets the current eligibility groups. Dr. Joe Kanter, Louisiana’s state health officer, wrote a letter to providers saying the agency has “received indications” some providers are limiting their vaccinations to people who had been patients of a hospital or clinic within recent months.

“To the extent that such discrimination is occurring, it must immediately cease,” Kanter wrote. He reminded providers they are subject to audits and “adverse action” could be considered if they are deemed to have “discriminated” between current patients of their facility and other members of the public.

Michigan:

Governor Whitmer unveiled the Michigan COVID-19 Recovery Plan, which includes a call to ramp up vaccine inoculations to 50,000 Michiganders per day. The plan also provides financial support to local health departments for costs associated with administering vaccinations, including staffing, equipment and supplies. The state is currently offering the vaccine to people 65 and older, health care workers, long term care workers and staff, and frontline essential workers including school and childcare staff, frontline responders, and corrections staff.

Mississippi:

Governor Reeves signed Executive Order 1542 which went into effect on January 15, 2021. It extends the Safe Recovery Order, previously implemented, through February 3, 2021. The Order adds two counties Executive Order 1539’s mask mandate, Claiborne and Tunica, and removes Adams, Jefferson, Lawrence, Quitman, and Wilkinson Counties from the mask mandate.

The State is making progress in its coronavirus vaccine distribution plan, and Mississippians aged 65 and over and those with certain chronic health conditions are now eligible for vaccinations, as well as healthcare personnel, first responders, and long-term care facility residents and staff.

New Jersey:

On January 19, Governor Murphy signed Executive Order No. 215 which extends the Public Health Emergency for thirty days. Executive Order No. 215 also extends all Executive Orders issued under the Governor’s authority under the Emergency Powers Act.

Governor Murphy announced two additional categories of New Jersey residents will be eligible to receive the COVID-19 vaccination. Those residents include those ages 65 and older and individuals between the ages of 16-64 with certain medical conditions that increase the risk of severe illness from the virus.

North Carolina:

On January 19, Governor Cooper and North Carolina Department of Health and Human Services (NCDHHS) Secretary Dr. Mandy Cohen announced that in accordance with federal recommendations, the state has given local entities the flexibility to begin vaccinating North Carolinians over the age of 65 and all health care workers who have in-person contact with patients.

In the last week, North Carolina has significantly increased the pace of vaccinations. The North Carolina Department of Health and Human Services is supporting health systems, local health departments and community health centers across the state to host large community vaccine events for people currently eligible to be vaccinated. More than 45,000 vaccines are expected to be given through these events. A list of local vaccine providers is available on YourSpotYourShot.nc.gov.

With vaccines still in short supply, the state is implementing a phased distribution of the vaccine. Learn more about who is currently eligible to get vaccinated and where you can set up an appointment in your community at the NCDHHS Find Your Spot to Take Your Shot site.

Ohio:

On January 20, Governor DeWine highlighted the vaccine distribution timeline for Phase 1B of Ohio's vaccination program, which began today for those ages 80 and up. The week of January 25, vaccinations are anticipated to begin for those ages 75 and up. Vaccinations will also be available to those with severe congenital, developmental, or early-onset medical disorders, and who have a developmental or intellectual disability. These conditions include:

  • Cerebral palsy
  • Spina bifida
  • Severe congenital heart disease requiring hospitalization within the past year
  • Severe type 1 diabetes requiring hospitalization within the past year
  • Inherited metabolic disorders, including phenylketonuria
  • Severe neurological disorders including epilepsy, hydrocephaly, and microcephaly
  • Severe genetic disorders, including: down syndrome, fragile X syndrome, Prader-Willi syndrome, Turner syndrome, and muscular dystrophy
  • Severe lung disease, including asthma requiring hospitalization within the past year, and cystic fibrosis
  • Sickle cell anemia
  • Alpha and beta thalassemia
  • Solid organ transplants

A representative from the local county developmental disabilities board will reach out to help coordinate receipt of the vaccination for Ohioans with severe congenital, developmental, or early-onset medical disorders, as well as a developmental or intellectual disability.

During the week of February 15, Ohioans with any of these conditions, and do not have a developmental or intellectual disability, will be eligible to receive the vaccination.

Additional information on how these individuals can choose to receive their vaccines is forthcoming. Each provider will begin administering vaccines the day after they receive their shipment. All vaccines must be distributed within seven days.

Week of February 1: Vaccinations are anticipated to begin for those ages 70 and up following the same process outlined above.

Week of February 8: Vaccinations are anticipated to begin for those ages 65 and up following the same process outlined above.

The Ohio Department of Health has launched a tool on vaccine.coronavirus.ohio.gov to assist residents looking for a provider that has been allocated vaccines. The tool is searchable by zip code and county, but it will not be uploaded in real-time. It is critical that those eligible to receive a vaccine consult local resources to determine up-to-date vaccine availability.

Vaccinations will also be available for personnel in Ohio schools in Phase 1B. As of January 20, 96% of public school districts have committed to returning to school at least partially in-person by March 1.

Schools committed to at least partially returning to in-person by March 1 have been designated a local Educational Service Center as a working partner. Additional details will be confirmed this week between the working partners and school districts.

School districts are also choosing a retail pharmacy partner, secured by the state, or an existing local partnership, to administer the vaccinations to school personnel. Beginning the week of February 1, vaccination administration will be coordinated with school-provider partnerships, and a majority will be closed clinics for school personnel only.

Furthermore, Governor DeWine announced today his nomination of former Ohio Supreme Court Justice Judith L. French as Director of the Ohio Department of Insurance. French brings more than 30 years of experience and will lead the department in providing consumer protection through education and fair, but vigilant, regulation while promoting a stable and competitive environment for insurers.

Oregon:

Governor Brown announced that Oregon would begin vaccinating educators and school staff on January 25, 2021 and Oregonians over 80 years of age on February 8, 2021, due to delays in receiving vaccines from the federal government.

The Oregon Department of Education released updated guidance on returning to schools, including a requirement that schools must offer on-site COVID-19 testing for symptomatic or exposed teachers, students, and staff. Governor Brown allocated $500 million of federal relief funds to help schools meet these requirements.

Washington:

On January 15, the Washington State Department of Health announced that each of the eight regions would remain in Phase 1 for the following week, as none of the regions had met the four metrics (decrease in cases per 100k, decrease in hospitalizations, less than 90% occupancy, and test positivity rate below 10%) required to move to Phase 2.

On January 18, Governor Inslee announced a new state plan for vaccine distribution, with the goal of vaccinating 45,000 Washingtonians each day. The newly-established Washington State Vaccine Command and Coordination Center will include both public and private actors, including assistance from Starbucks, Microsoft, Costco, and the National Guard. Along with this announcement, certain changes were made to vaccination phases, including changing the age restriction for Phase 1b, tier 1, which began on January 19, 2021, to 65+, as opposed to 70+. Washington will allow providers to move to Phase 1B, tier 2 once 50% of the Phase 1B, tier 1 has been vaccinated. Finally, Washington is allowing providers to vaccinate Phase 1b, tiers 2-4 individuals if they are in congregate settings (for example, if a school district is vaccinating its employees, it can vaccinate all employees who qualify for Phase 1b, tiers 2, 3, and 4).

Governor Inslee extended 26 emergency proclamations on January 19, 2021, after the Washington legislature authorized the extending of those proclamations, which last throughout the duration of the state of emergency. Among other things, the extended proclamations:

  • Suspend in-person eye examinations and renewals related to driver’s licenses;
  • Suspend laws and rules relating to tax penalties, fees, interest, and due dates;
  • Prohibit the disconnecting of energy, telecommunications, or water services due to nonpayment, as well as prohibiting the charging of late fees;
  • Require online public agency meetings to be available to the public;
  • Suspend the job search requirement to collect unemployment insurance;
  • Suspend some requirements to license health care providers to increase the availability of health care workers;
  • Suspend requirements regarding the licensing of health care facilities and the production of hand sanitizer;
  • Suspend certain requirements for the payment of state employee’s vacation and annual leave benefits;
  • Suspend certain rules relating to nursing home transfers and discharges;
  • Suspend certain requirements for in-person hearings and other services related to domestic violence reports;
  • Limit certain rules surrounding the collection of consumer debt;
  • Allow community associations to hold remote meetings; and
  • Delay the implementation of a law prohibiting the use of single-use plastic bags.

Wisconsin:

On January 19, Governor Evers issued Executive Order #104, which extended the public health emergency related to COVID-19 for an additional 60 days. Governor Evers also issued Emergency Order #1 which requires every individual over the age of five to wear a face covering when (a) the individual is indoors or in an enclosed space, other than at a private residence; and (b) another person or persons who are not members of individual’s household or living unit are present in the same room or enclosed space, with some exceptions. Face coverings are strongly recommended in all other settings, including outdoors when it is not possible to maintain physical distancing. Emergency Order #1 will expire on March 20, 2021.

January 19, 2021

Delaware:

On January 19, 2021, Governor Carney and the Delaware Division of Public Health (DPH) announced that the state is transitioning to Phase 1B of the COVID-19 vaccination rollout plan. This phase of the plan focuses on persons 65 years old and older.

There are five drive-through vaccination events for persons 65 and older, as well as for remaining Phase 1A personnel, on Friday, January 22 at the Delaware City Division of Motor Vehicles and on Saturday and Sunday, January 23 and 24, at both the Delaware City and Georgetown DMV locations. These events require an appointment, which can be made here. The link opens on January 20, 2021 at 8:30 am.

Information concerning additional Phase 1B eligible individuals (including K-12 educations, child care workers, correctional officers, and other frontline essential workers) will be released next week.

District of Columbia:

On January 15, DC Health announced that on January 16, 4,309 vaccination appointments would become available to residents of Wards 1, 4, 5, 7, and 8 who are aged 65 and older and/or work in a health care setting. On January 18, an additional 1,436 appointments became available to any DC resident who is 65 and older or any individual who works in a health care setting in DC.

On January 16, Mayor Bowser announced that the District’s coronavirus (COVID-19) data includes 1,000,492 completed tests.

Georgia:

Governor Kemp signed an Executive Order on January 15 to protect and strengthen Georgia’s economy and provide for the health, safety, and welfare of Georgia’s residents and visitors. The Executive Order encourages residents to practice social distancing, wear face coverings and prevents gatherings that could spread the virus. The Order requires all restaurants and dining services, movie theaters, gyms and other businesses, where gatherings can take place, to implement measures to mitigate exposure and the spread of COVID-19.

Illinois:

January 19, 2021: Following increased staffing at hospitals throughout the state, the Illinois Department of Public Health announced a change to its COVID mitigation metrics. Under these new metrics, Regions 8, 9, 10, and 11 will move from Tier 3, the most restrictive Tier, to Tier 2. Regions 1 and 6 will move to Tier 1, and Regions 3 and 5 will return to Phase 4 of Governor Pritzker’s Restore Illinois Plan. Mitigation metrics for moving from a higher to lower tier are as follows:

  • In order to move to Tier 2 mitigations, a region must meet the following metrics:
    • A test positivity rate ≤8 percent and ˂12 percent for three consecutive days, as measured by the 7-day rolling average; AND
    • ≥20 percent available staffed ICU hospital beds for three consecutive days, on a 7-day rolling average; AND
    • A sustained decrease in the number of people in the hospital with COVID-19 for seven out of 10 days, on a 7-day average.
  • In order to move to Tier 1 mitigations, a region must meet the following metrics:
    • A test positivity rate between 6.5 and 8 percent for three consecutive days, as measured by the 7-day rolling average; AND
    • ≥20 percent available staffed ICU hospital beds for three consecutive days, on a 7-day rolling average; AND
    • No sustained increase in the number of people in the hospital with COVID-19 for seven out of 10 days, on a 7-day average.
  • In order to move to Phase 4, a region must meet the following metrics:
    • A test positivity rate less ≤6.5 percent for three consecutive days, as measured by the 7-day rolling average; AND
    • ≥20 percent available staffed ICU hospital beds for three consecutive days, on a 7-day rolling average; AND
    • No sustained increase in the number of people in the hospital with COVID-19 for seven out of 10 days, on a 7-day average.

Notably, in returning to Phase 1, Regions 3 and 5 will see gatherings of 50 people or fewer allowed. Additionally, various businesses will see the easing of restrictions as follows:

  • Manufacturing: All manufacturing open with IDPH approved safety guidance.
  • “Non-essential” businesses: All employees return to work with IDPH approved safety guidance; Employers are encouraged to provide accommodations for COVID-19-vulnerable employees.
  • Bars and restaurants: Open with capacity limits and IDPH approved safety guidance.
  • Personal care services and health clubs: All barbershops, salons, spas and health and fitness clubs open with capacity limits and IDPH approved safety guidance.
  • Entertainment: Cinema and theaters open with capacity limits and IDPH approved safety guidance.
  • Retail: Open with capacity limits and IDPH approved safety guidance.

Kentucky:

(Lexington): On January 19, Baptist Health has announced it is now scheduling COVID-19 vaccinations for people in phases 1A and 1B, while the University of Kentucky has begun to invite people to sign up to be vaccinated at Kroger Field. Phase 1A is meant for healthcare personnel employed in the state of Kentucky. Phase 1B focuses on people ages 70 and up.

Because initial vaccine supplies are limited, Baptist Health is prioritizing administration based on guidance from the CDC and Kentucky state authorities. If you meet the current criteria, you may schedule an appointment to be vaccinated online.

UK is also giving priority to health care workers and older Kentuckians. The state's phased vaccine plan can be found here. A request for vaccination can be submitted here.

All vaccines will be provided by appointment only. Walk-ins to hospitals will not be provided a vaccine.

Maryland:

On January 14, Governor Hogan announced the expansion of COVID-19 vaccine eligibility. On Monday, January 18, the State of Maryland will officially enter Phase 1B, which includes Maryland residents who are 75 years and older; Marylanders in assisted living, independent living, developmental disabilities or behavioral health group homes, and other congregate facilities; high-risk incarcerated individuals; continuity of government vaccinations; and education, including K-12 teachers, support staff, and childcare providers. On January 25, the state will enter Phase 1C, which includes Maryland residents ages 65 to 74; public health and safety workers not covered in Phase 1A; and essential workers in lab services, food and agriculture production, manufacturing, the U.S. Postal Service, public transit, and grocery stores.

On January 15, Governor Hogan announced $30 million in awards for more than 90 live music and performance venues, live entertainment promoters, and independently-owned local movie theaters whose operations have been impacted by COVID-19 as part of the second of three phases of economic relief awards administered by the Maryland Department of Housing and Community Development. This is part of the more than $700 million in emergency economic relieve provided by the State of Maryland.

On January 18, Governor Hogan announced $34 million in awards for critical capital projects in the State of Maryland to improve infrastructure at colleges and universities and to support economic development across the state. This $34 million is comprised of the following projects: (1) $24.2 million for shovel-ready capital maintenance projects for the University System of Maryland ($21.2 million), Morgan State University ($2 million), and St. Mary’s College of Maryland ($1 million); (2) $6.8 million for facility renewal projects at the state’s 16 community college; and (3) $3 million to fund capital grants for shovel-ready projects through the Department of Housing and Community Development’s Strategic Demolition and Smart Growth Impact Fund. These funds would become available immediately upon passage of the Fiscal Year 2022 budget by the legislature, which will be introduced this week.

Minnesota:

On January 13, 2021, Governor Walz extended the Peacetime Emergency in Emergency Executive Order 21-04. The COVID-19 Peacetime Emergency is extended through February 12, 2021.

Missouri:

(Statewide): The Missouri Department of Health & Senior Services ordered on January 14, 2021, vaccines be administered to individuals whose status or condition warrant it, including those in Phase 1A, and Tier 1 of Phase 1B, for the time being, and includes the fully defined categories of phases. This order will remain in effect until December 31, 2021, unless otherwise modified. The COVID-19 Vaccine Availability list can be found here. Those in Phase 1A include healthcare workers and long-term care facility residents and staff. Tier 1 of Phase 1 B includes first responders & those working in emergency services.

(Kansas City): Kansas City Mayor Quinton Lucas issued a Twelfth Amended Order 20-01, amending the Eleventh Amended Order 20-01, and took effect on January 13, 2021, and expires with the Fifth Amended Emergency Proclamation unless rescinded or amended. Under this order:

  • Employers are required to reasonably accommodate employees with health or safety concerns, responsibility for minors or others, and not require they report to work in certain situations.
  • Restaurants, taverns, and venues, must:
    • Limit occupancy to 50% of their capacity,
    • Close by 12:00 a.m. (midnight),
    • Require mask be work indoors and outdoors while standing or sitting unless actively eating or drinking, and
    • Limit parties to 10 or fewer persons.
  • Masks must be work in all indoor spaces when more than one person is in a room not separated by a barrier unless exempted.
  • Businesses shall
    • Ensure access to handwashing facilities, hand sanitizer, and cleaning supplies,
    • Provide regular sanitation of high touch areas,
    • Post signage of hygiene and safety protocols,
    • Avoid sharing equipment and supplies, and
    • Maintain records of occupants who are on the premises for more than 10 minutes and notify the Director of Public Health of a positive case.
  • Gyms and fitness centers must limit their occupancy to 50% of their capacity and must require masks.
  • Gatherings of more than 10 people are prohibited, which does not include groups from the same household, unless approved by the Director of Public Health.

(Jackson County): Jackson County issued an amended Order, which took effect on January 14, 2021, and will continue until rescinded or amended in writing. Under this order, certain restrictions on Eastern Jackson County are re-imposed, including:

  • Masks must be worn unless exempted.
  • Businesses frequented by the public must limit occupancy to 50% of their capacity,
  • Restaurants, taverns, and venues for food and drink, must:
    • Limit occupancy to 50% of their capacity,
    • Close by 12:00 a.m. (midnight),
    • Require indoor patrons to be seated and wearing a mask unless actively eating or drinking, and
    • Limit parties to 10 or fewer persons.
  • Gyms and fitness centers must limit their occupancy to 50% of their capacity and must require masks.
  • Gatherings of more than 10 people are prohibited, which does not include groups from the same household, unless approved by the Director of Public Health.

(Platte County): Platte County issued an amended Order, which took effect on January 16, 2021, and will remain in effect until further notice. Under this order masks continue to be required in all indoor and outdoor locations, settings and events where individuals are less than six feet away from each other. Additionally:

  • Restaurants, taverns, and other venues for food and drink, must:
    • Limit occupancy to 50% of that authorized,
    • Close by 12:00 a.m. (midnight),
    • Require indoor and outdoor patrons be seated and wearing a mask unless actively eating or drinking, and
    • Limit parties to 10 or fewer persons.
  • Masks must be work in all indoor spaces when more than one person is in a room not separated by a barrier unless exempted.
  • Businesses shall maintain records of occupants who are on the premises for more than 10 minutes and notify the Director of Public Health of a positive case.
  • Gyms and fitness centers must limit their occupancy to 50% of their capacity and must require masks.
  • Businesses generally open to the public must maintain six feet of distance between areas of service.
  • Gatherings of more than 10 people are prohibited, which does not include groups from the same household, unless approved by the Director of Public Health.

(Clay County): Clay County issued a Public Health Emergency Order on January 13, 2021, which took effect on January 14, 2021. Under this new order restaurants, taverns and other venues serving food and drink will be permitted to remain open until 12.00 a.m. (midnight), but must continue to follow the previous restrictions contained in Order 11172020.

(City of Columbia): The City of Columbia issued Order No. 2020-18 extending phase two, step three, of its reopening plans until February 16, 2021, at 11:59 p.m., under Order No. 2020-11. Under the current phase:

  • Face masks are required when social distancing cannot be maintained and when not exempt
  • Restaurants and bars:
    • Must close by 10:30 p.m., but may continue curb-side and off-premise delivery of food,
    • Are limited to ten persons per table,
    • May not utilize standing bars or buffets, and
    • Customers must wear a mask when not seated
  • Large venues and entertainment facilities must submit an operational plan and are limited to 100 people
  • Child care services may not have groups larger than 50 children
  • Personal care services are limited to 50% capacity or 50 people, whichever is fewer
  • Pools must limit their capacity to 50 people with social distancing.

(Boone County): Boone County issued Order No. 2020-18C, which takes effect at 12:00 a.m. on January 19, 2021, and remains in effect until 11:59 p.m. February 16, 2021. Under this order:

  • Businesses must continue to adhere to social distancing and regular disinfecting,
  • Gatherings held at a business open to the public must be limited to 50% of their capacity, or a maximum of 100 people,
  • Restaurants and bars that serve alcohol must close by 10:30 p.m., but may continue curb-side and off-premise delivery of food,
  • Restaurants that don’t serve alcohol are not required to close at 10:30 p.m.,
  • All restaurants and bars are permitted to operate without occupancy limits provided that:
    • Groups are limited to 10 persons,
    • Social distancing between tables is observed,
    • Standing bars or buffets are not utilized,
    • Customers must wear a mask when not seated, and
    • Customers must remain seated when not entering, exiting, or vising the restroom,
  • Entertainment venues must:
    • Limit their capacity to 100 people,
    • Food and beverages must be consumed while seated,
    • Tables must be limited to 10 persons per table,
    • Social distancing between tables must be maintained,
    • Patrons must wear a mask when not seated, and
    • Close by 10:30 p.m.
  • Child care services must:
    • Maintain stable groups, no changing from one group to another,
    • Keep groups separate and in different rooms,
    • Keep the same provider with the same group of children, and
    • Limit groups to 50 children.
  • Personal care services are limited to 50% capacity or 50 people, whichever is fewer
  • Pools must limit their capacity to 50 people with social distancing.

Montana:

On January 19, Governor Gianforte announced that Montana is moving into Phase 1B of Montana’s COVID-19 Vaccine Distribution Plan. Phase 1B includes people age 70 and older and Native Americans and other people of color who may be at elevated risk for COVID-19 complications. Additionally, Phase 1B includes, persons aged 16-69 with high-risk medical conditions.

Nevada:

On January 14, 2021, Nevada Health Response released guidance to clarify which medical professionals are permitted to administer COVID-19 vaccinations, with or without supervision. All providers of medical services, including students and trainees, may administer COVID-19 vaccines provided that:

  • The individual is competent in doing so;
  • If providing injections is outside their normal scope of practice, the individual has completed the CDC’s self-paced vaccine administration course (https://www.cdc.gov/vaccines/hcp/admin/admin-protocols.html); and
  • The injections are given in a setting where potential anaphylactic reactions can be appropriately monitored by appropriately-licensed medical personnel.

New Jersey:

On January 19, Governor Murphy signed Executive Order No. 215 which extends the Public Health Emergency for thirty days. Executive Order No. 215 also extends all Executive Orders issued under the Governor’s authority under the Emergency Powers Act.

Governor Murphy announced two additional categories of New Jersey residents will be eligible to receive the COVID-19 vaccination. Those residents include those ages 65 and older and individuals between the ages of 16-64 with certain medical conditions that increase the risk of severe illness from the virus.

New York:

On January 18, Governor Cuomo announced eight community vaccination kits have been deployed to churches and cultural institutions in New York City, Long Island and Westchester. The goal of these sites is to bolster the equitable distribution of the COVID-19 vaccine to communities of color and low income communities.

On January 15, Governor Cuomo announced the first five community vaccination kits have been deployed to NYCHA housing developments across New York City. The sites are strictly eligible to NYCHA residents. To make an appointment please contact Somos, by calling 1-833-SOMOSNY.

(New York City): On January 17, Mayor de Blasio signed Executive Order 175 extending the State of Emergency declaration in New York City until January 22.

Rhode Island:

Governor Raimondo issued Executive Order 21-06 on January 19, 2021 that extended the following executive orders until February 17, 2021:

  1. Executive Order 20-02 (Declaration of Disaster Emergency).
  2. Executive Order 20-29 (Twenty-Sixth Supplemental Emergency Declaration - Promoting Better Coordination of Health Care Coverage).
  3. Executive Order 20-39 (Thirty-Sixth Supplemental Emergency Declaration - Authorizing adjustments to Child Care Subsidies and Reimbursement Rates).

January 18, 2021

Kansas:

(Johnson County): On January 18, Johnson County officials announced Johnson County has launched a survey to notify residents in Phase 2 of the state's vaccination plan when they will be eligible to receive a vaccine.

In Kansas, those in Phase 2 include adults 65 and older, employees and residents in congregate settings, and high-contact critical workers, including first responders, grocery store workers, and K-12 school and child care staff.

Johnson County residents who fall into those categories and want to be notified when the vaccine becomes available to them should complete the survey on the county’s website.

Taking the survey does not create an appointment or reserve a vaccine, the county said. After receiving a notification from the county, residents will be instructed on how to schedule a vaccine. Phase 2 of the vaccination plan is expected to begin by early February.

The Johnson County Department of Health and Environment said Friday it is nearing completion of vaccinating health care workers in Phase 1 of the state’s plan.

The county does not have a list for the general public to sign up for the vaccine.

For more information on the vaccine rollout in Johnson County, visit the county's COVID-19 resources website.

Kentucky:

On January 16, Governor Beshear, state officials, and Kroger leadership announced a new partnership to significantly increase the speed of COVID-19 vaccinations across the commonwealth.

The first Kroger regional, drive-through vaccination sites will open the week of February 1 for Kentuckians in Phase 1A, 1B and 1C. For more details on who is included in each phase, click here. On January 28, the Governor said more details would be announced on site locations and how to sign up.

Vaccinations have already begun for K-12 school personnel through individual school districts and will continue to ramp up over the next few weeks. The Governor said the state expects to finish administering initial vaccination doses for K-12 educators and support staff the week of February 1.

The Governor urged Kentuckians to be patient as vaccine allocations from the federal government are still far too small to cover everyone in Phase 1A, 1B and 1C who wants to be vaccinated. However, it is critically important that the state gets vaccines into arms quickly. That means in some cases, vaccine providers will need to vaccinate Kentuckians out of the phase sequence in order to meet the state’s goal of administering 90% of vaccines within one week of their arrival at a distribution site.

The Governor said 324,650 COVID-19 vaccine doses have been received in Kentucky and 172,537 doses have been administered. Of the doses administered, 28,977 have been given to long-term care facility residents and staff.

More than 67,000 doses were administered from January 3 to 9, about 30,000 more doses than were administered the week prior. Since January 10, more than 45,000 additional doses have been administered.

Walgreens and CVS have a contract with the federal government to administer vaccines to residents and staff at long-term care facilities.

Adam Mather, inspector general at the Kentucky Cabinet for Health and Family Services, announced that during the week of January 4 to 10, Walgreens completed vaccinations at 72 long-term care facilities, with 3,512 residents and 2,059 staff receiving doses.

That week, CVS completed vaccinations at 75 long-term care facilities, with 2,973 residents and 2,432 staff receiving doses.

Furthermore, Amy Cubbage, general counsel for Governor Beshear, updated Kentuckians on virtual appointment scheduling, federal Continued Assistance Act implementation and the number of Kentuckians who have now received unemployment insurance (UI) payments.

“The virtual appointment schedule is an 18-calendar day rolling schedule,” Cubbage said. For instance, day 1 is January 14. Day 18 is January 31. Appointments for February 1 should be on the website for claimants to schedule. Appointment hours are 8:00 a.m. to 12:00 p.m. and 1:00 p.m. to 3:00 p.m. daily. There are currently 16 staff working 125 appointments a day.

The system allows claimants to schedule, reschedule and cancel appointments as well as add the appointment information to their calendars. If a claimant forgets their appointment information, they can go to the website, enter their email address and the system will resend the appointment information. The system is also set to send reminders to claimants with appointments the day before their scheduled appointment.

“The programming for the federal Continuing Assistance Act is largely finished. Additional $300 per week payments should start going out next week,” Cubbage said. “Additional PUA/PEUC weeks should be ready to claim without opening a new claim, even if you had exhausted your full number of weeks previously.”

Louisiana:

On January 16, the Louisiana Department of Health confirmed the state’s first identified case of the COVID-19 variant, SARS-CoV-2 B.1.1.7., frequently referred to as the U.K. variant because it is prevalent in the United Kingdom, in an individual in the Greater New Orleans area.

This variant spreads more easily from one person to another than other viral strains currently circulating in the United States, though It has not been shown to cause more severe disease. Health experts believe current COVID-19 vaccines are effective against the variant strain.

The Department conducted a case investigation and contact tracing to identify, inform and monitor anyone who was in close contact with the individual, who has a reported history of travel outside of Louisiana. However, the variant strain has been detected in at least 15 other states and is likely circulating in Louisiana as well.

Because this variant strain is more contagious, it is more important than ever that Louisianans:

  • Wear masks,
  • Wash hands,
  • Practice distancing,
  • Avoid gatherings,
  • Stay home when sick,
  • Quarantine and get tested if exposed to a positive case, and
  • When it is your turn, consider getting the COVID-19 vaccine.

The Department has been preparing for this variant strain by participating in the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s national SARS-CoV-2 Strain Surveillance Program and has been sending bi-weekly samples to the CDC for sequencing since November 2020. The State Public Health Laboratory is also working with clinical laboratories throughout Louisiana to conduct targeted surveillance for suspect variant strains.

North Carolina:

(Wake County): On January 19, starting at 8:30 a.m., those eligible can contact Wake County on a 24-hour vaccine hotline or an online tool to register to be vaccinated. Once registered, you will receive a notification when an appointment is available. Priority will be determined by age and risk of contracting the virus, the county says. Not the order in which someone joins the waiting list.

(Durham County): On January 19, Group 2 vaccinations begin by appointment. Those eligible must call the county’s hotline 919-560-HELP (919-560-4357) Monday – Friday, 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. The county says they are experiencing extremely high call volume.

(Johnston County): On January 18, county officials announced that on January 20, 2021, a drive-thru clinic will occur for Group 2 vaccinations at Corinth Holders High School located at 6875 Applewhite Road, Wendell, NC 27591. The clinic will last from 10:00 a.m. to 2:00 p.m., or until supplies last. Participants should bring ID to verify eligibility if they are in the category for adults 65 and older.

(Cumberland County): On January 18, county officials announced they are hosting vaccine clinics for Group 2 on Tuesdays, Wednesdays and Fridays from 9:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. A special Saturday clinic will occur on January 23 from 9:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. The clinics will be held at Crown Expo Center, 1960 Coliseum Dr., Fayetteville. Appointment slots can be made from 9:00 a.m. to 11:00 a.m. and from 11:00 a.m. to 1:00 p.m., from 1:00 p.m. to 4:00 p.m. vaccines will be first come, first served.

(Orange County): On January 18, county officials announced those eligible for Group 2 vaccinations must register for an appointment online or by calling 919-913-8088.

(Nash County): On January 18, county officials stated no vaccination events are slated for this week, but are asking those eligible in Group 2 to register online. For questions, there is a COVID-19 hotline at 252-462-2079, or email at covid19@nashcountync.gov.

(Person County): On January 18, county officials stated no vaccination events are slated for this week.

(Franklin County): On January 18, county officials announced that registration is required for Group 2 vaccine clinic events. Those in Group 2 can register by calling (919) 729-0654 or 919-496-2533 or email CovidVAX@franklincountync.us.

(Chatham County): On January 18, county officials announced that vaccinations for Group 2 are by appointment after registering. Group 2 may register online or call (919) 545-8323 to register. The phone line is operational from 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.

(Harnett County): On January 18, county officials announced that vaccinations for Group 2 are offered by appointment, however officials say phone lines, call center, and website are at capacity.

(Wayne County): On January 18, county officials announced that vaccinations for Group 2 are offered by appointment. To register, call the hotline, Monday-Friday from 10:00 a.m. until 2:00 p.m. at 919-705-1800. Officials ask those eligible to call back until they get a called taker to receive a time slot or be put on a waiting list.

(Lee County): On January 18, county officials announced they are offering vaccinations for Group 2 at a drive-thru clinic, but require registration for an allotted time. To register, call (919) 721-4769 or (984) 368-2112 on Monday through Friday, from 8:00 a.m. to 12:00 p.m. or 1:00 p.m. to 5:00 p.m.

(Granville and Vance Counties): On January 18, county officials announced that vaccinations for Group 2 are offered by appointment. To schedule an appointment, call the GVPH COVID Vaccine Hotline at 252-295-1503.

(Warren County): On January 18, county officials announced that vaccinations for Group 2 are offered by appointment. To schedule an appointment, call the Warren County Health Department at (252) 257-1185.

(Halifax County): On January 18, county officials announced that Group 2 vaccinations are offered by appointment. To check your eligibility and schedule an appointment, please call 252-641-7511.

(Edgecombe County): On January 18, county officials announced that Group 2 vaccinations are offered by appointment. To check your eligibility and schedule an appointment, please call 252-641-7511.

(Wilson County): On January 18, county officials announced that Group 2 vaccinations are offered by appointment. Register online or call 252-360-0500.

(Northampton County): On January 18, county officials announced that Group 2 vaccinations are offered by appointment. Call 252-534-5841 to be added to the waiting list. You will be contacted for an appointment.

(Hoke County): On January 18, county officials announced that Group 2 vaccinations are offered by appointment. Call 910-753-4429 or 910-753-4430 or download the forms, and email them to COVIDVAC@hokehealth.org.

(Moore County): On January 18, county officials announced that Group 2 vaccinations are offered by appointment at the Moore County Health Department Clinic on Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday and Saturday. People can pre-register online or call 910-947-SHOT (7468) from 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.

Ohio:

On January 13, Ohio state officials launched a website showing all 750 vaccine distribution sites that will be open starting next week, when the state will begin the next phase of its vaccination program, making it available to residents 80 and older.

Governor DeWine said that 361,000 people in the state have received at least the first dose of one of the two-step vaccines from manufacturers Pfizer and Moderna. Although there are 425,000 Ohioans who are 80 and older, DeWine said the state expects to receive only about 100,000 doses for distribution next week. The state plans to expand the vaccine offering to those 75 and older the following week, then those 70 and older on February 1, and then those 65 and older on February 8. That may lead to adjustments in the vaccine plan as the weeks go on. DeWine said that over time, vaccine production should increase, and additional manufacturers may receive approval for their vaccines, leading to increased availability in the state and distribution at more and larger facilities.

Rhode Island:

Governor Raimondo issued Executive Order 21-05 on January 15, 2021 that extended Executive Order 20-108 (One Hundred and Third Supplemental Emergency Declaration – Protecting Your Household) until February 18, 2021.

January 14, 2021

Arizona:

(Maricopa & Pima Counties): Starting January 11, Maricopa County will open vaccination scheduling at Point of Dispensing sites for Phase 1B prioritized individuals who can be vaccinated. Populations eligible for vaccination in Phase 1B (Priority) are: Adults age 75 and older; K-12 school staff and childcare workers; law enforcement/protective services (including all sworn officers and government-employed security officers); and Phase 1A populations, which include healthcare workers, emergency medical services workers, and long-term care facility staff and residents.

Starting January 14, Pima County is open for vaccination registrations for individuals in the Phase 1B1a-c priority groups, which include: Adults age 75 and older; prioritized essential workers in protective service occupations (law enforcement, corrections, firefighters, other emergency response staff, and 911 call center staff and trainees in high-risk settings; and education and childcare providers (K-12 and higher education teachers and staff, and student teachers).

Connecticut:

Governor Lamont announced on January 14, 2021 that the state has started accepting reservations by those 75 and older to receive initial doses of the COVID-19 vaccine, while also expanding the group eligible for vaccines under the state’s Phase 1b rollout.

Those 75 and older can either contact their healthcare provided, reserve an appointment at the state’s online portal, or call the state’s vaccine hotline - 877-918-2224 – to make an appointment to receive the vaccine.

While those in the 75+ age group can already begin making appointments, Phase 1b, which begins on January 18, 2020, will also include availability for those between front-line essential workers, those working and living in “congregate” settings, those between 65-75 years of age, and those between 16 and 64 who have other illnesses or conditions who are more at risk from COVID-19. The last two groups were added on the recommendation of a state subcommittee that met on January 12, 2020.

Essential front-line workers now include the following groups:

  • Healthcare personnel not included in Phase 1a
  • First responders
  • Agricultural workers, including farmworkers
  • Food service and restaurants
  • U.S. Postal Service workers
  • Manufacturing workers
  • Grocery store & pharmacy workers
  • Public transit workers
  • Food banks and meal delivery services for the elderly
  • Education and child-care workers
  • Solid waste and wastewater workers
  • Inspectors working on site in the above locations
  • Frontline public and social services

Congregate facilities include the following:

  • halfway homes,
  • inpatient mental health facilities,
  • corrections facilities,
  • homeless shelters,
  • domestic violence shelters,
  • substance use and residential treatment facilities

The groups encompass more than 1.3 million Connecticut residents; the state expects to receive approximately 46,000 doses of the vaccine each week from the federal government.

For more information on Phase 1b vaccinations, visit ct.gov/covidvaccine.

Florida:

(Palm Beach County): Mayor Kerner issued a Declaration of Continuing State of Emergency further extending the state of local emergency through January 22, 2021.

(Miami-Dade County): Mayor Daniella Levine Cava issued an Executive Order further extending the state of local emergency for an additional 7-day period, beginning on January 14, 2021. The Order was accompanied by an affidavit justifying the extension.

Georgia:

(Atlanta): On January 13, Mayor Bottoms signed Executive Order No. 2021-06 declaring an emergency within the City of Atlanta. This order requires all higher risk persons to shelter in place within their homes or places of residences to limit their social interaction and prevent the spread of or infection of COVID-19. Also, any person in any private business, establishment, corporation, non-profit, or public place must wear a facial covering of the mouth and nose at all times where physical distancing may be difficult. For more information about the restrictions, visit here.

Kentucky:

(Louisville): On January 13, Louisville health officials announced that if you are a Louisville resident age 70 or older, you can now sign up on the city's online portal to receive a COVID-19 vaccine. Louisville health officials are still working through the first phase of vaccinations for medical front-line workers and long-term care residents, but they are looking ahead to the next group to receive the shots.

According to Kentucky guidelines, the next phase (Phase 1B) will include people 70 and older, non-medical first responders and also school personnel. Louisvillians who are 70 or older can go online here to request a vaccination appointment. Those who sign up need to make sure to fill out all the information, only fill out the form once and wait their turn.

According to the city's office for Public Health and Wellness, vaccinations for people 70 and older are not expected to begin until at least February. Those who sign up online will receive a message when it is their turn for the COVID-19 vaccine. As a reminder, the online portal is only for those 70 and older. The city's website also has information about where to go for vaccinations, how the process works and additional answers to other questions.

Officials said when it's time for the second dose of the COVID-19 vaccine, people will be contacted by the organization from which they received their first dose. The two doses will come from the same provider.

Other groups included in the second phase -- non-medical first responders and school personnel -- will have their vaccine appointments scheduled through their employers. There is no need for those individuals to use the online portal. According to the city's website, phase three (Phase 1C) will include all essential workers, people 60 and older and anyone 16 and older with underlying health conditions. That phase is not expected to begin until late summer or early fall.

Louisiana:

On January 13, Governor Edwards announced the United States Court of Appeals for the Fifth District denied an appeal by 21 bar owners seeking to overturn Governor Edwards’ mitigation measures to slow the spread of COVID-19 in Louisiana, marking the ninth time that a court has ruled in favor of the governor’s orders.

Maryland:

On January 14, Governor Hogan announced that Maryland is eligible for $402,439,000 in federal rental assistance through the Consolidated Appropriations Act. The majority of the funding will be administered by the Maryland Department of Housing and Community Development. The funding can be used for rent, utilities, home energy costs, arrears, and other housing expenses resulting from the pandemic. The state must wait for the issuance of regulatory language from the federal government to deploy funding.

Michigan:

The Michigan Department of Health and Human Services (“MDHHS”) released another order, outlining specific requirements for hospitals, laboratories, and health professionals, as well as related instructions on how to follow those requirements. The requirements are as follows:

  • All Clinical Laboratory Improvement Amendment (CLIA)-certified facilitates, including CLIA certificate waiver facilities, that process tests for COVID-19 to prioritize sampling and testing for COVID-19.
  • Physicians and other health professions who collect specimens for testing of COVID-19 must label the specimens in a specific manner, as outlined in the instructions.
  • Physicians and other health professionals who administer a vaccine for COVID-19 must document the vaccinating in the Michigan Care Improvement registry (MCIR).
  • Hospitals must abide by the instructions relating to reporting information related to the COVID-19 response.

The relevant instructions can be found on the last pages of the order. The order went into effect immediately on January 13, 2021 and will remain in effect until rescinded.

Montana:

On January 13, Montana’s newly elected governor, Greg Gianforte, issued Executive Order No. 2-2021 declaring a new state of emergency. In conjunction with Order 2-2021, Governor Gianforte issued the Directive Implementing Executive Order 2-2021, which removes restrictions on businesses imposed by the previous administration. Specifically, under Governor Bullock’s administration, restaurants, bars, breweries, distilleries, and casinos were required to operate at 50% capacity and close by 10:00 p.m., except breweries, which must already close earlier. Additionally, Bullock restricted the size limit for public gatherings 25 people. Governor Gianforte’s Directive repeals these restrictions. However, this change will not override orders from county boards of health that have adopted their own capacity or hour restriction. Further, the state’s mask mandate remains unchanged.

New York:

On January 14, Governor Cuomo and NewYork-Presbyterian announced a new COVID-19 vaccination site for New Yorkers at the Fort Washington Armory in Washington Heights in New York City. This vaccination site is offering COVID-19 vaccinations to individuals over the age of 65 with scheduled appointments only beginning on January 14. To make an appointment online, please use this portal or this portal.

(New York City): Mayor de Blasio announced that New York City will open vaccination clinics for residents 65 or older this coming weekend. The clinics will open at the Van Dyke I & II Houses in Brooklyn, Cassidy Lafayette Houses in Staten Island and the Polo Grounds Towers in Manhattan. The Mayor also plans to move the sites across the city in the coming weeks.

Oklahoma:

On January 14, Governor Stitt issued Ninth Amended Executive Order 2020-20, which extends the state of emergency in Oklahoma. Most notably, the Order removes the requirement for restaurants and bars to close for in person dining and service at 11:00 p.m. which was previously put in place by Seventh Amended Executive Order 2020-20.

Rhode Island:

Governor Raimondo issued Executive Order 21-01 on January 6, 2021 that extends the following executive orders until February 4, 2021:

  1. Executive Order 20-44 (Fortieth Supplemental Emergency Declaration - Uniform Statewide School Calendar).
  2. Executive Order 20-46 (Forty-Second Supplemental Emergency Declaration - Public Meetings and Public Records Requests).
  3. Executive Order 20-62 (Fifty-Seventh Supplemental Emergency Declaration - School Bus Driver Recertification).
  4. Executive Order 20-96 (Ninety-First Supplemental Emergency Declaration - Student Transportation).

Governor Raimondo issued Executive Order 21-03 on January 13, 2021 that extends the following executive orders until February 11, 2021:

  1. Executive Order 20-37 (Thirty-Fourth Supplemental Emergency Declaration - Increasing State COVID-19 Response Capacity).
  2. Executive Order 20-107 (Hundred-and-Second Supplemental Emergency Declaration - Suspending Qualified Jobs Incentive Tax Credit Certification Period).

Governor Raimondo issued Executive Order 21-04 on January 14, 2021 that allows “Institutes of Higher Education” (IHE) to conduct in-person learning (defined as instruction where some or all instructors meet in the same physical space) this spring so long as each IHE:

  1. complies with the Rhode Island Department of Health (RIDOH) guidelines and all applicable Rhode Island executive orders;
  2. either (i) administers an initial COVID test to each student prior to starting in-person learning or (ii) requires each student to present a negative COVID test taken within 72 hours of arriving on campus. COVID test results must be sent to RIDOH no later than 2 days after receipt of results. Students participating in remote learning only do not need to take a COVID test; and
  3. Shall provide isolation housing to all undergraduate students who test positive for COVID.

What follows is Rhode Island’s COVID-19 vaccine distribution plan. Rhode Island is administering COVID vaccines by Pfizer and Moderna. The Rhode Island Department of Health’s COVID-19 page can be found at this link. The plan rolls out in phases, and all of the information pertaining to Phase I can be found here. Rhode Island has not announced its Phase II. The Phase I vaccination program tracks the following timeline:

  • December 2020 – The following individuals have been able to receive the vaccine since December 14, 2020: hospital staff, EMS, home health and hospice workers, nursing home staff, and residents of nursing homes.
  • Early to Mid-January (Current Phase) – The following individuals should be able to receive the vaccine now: COVID vaccinators, urgent care clinic staff workers, pharmacists, corrections staff, high-risk incarcerated persons (defined as 65 and older, immunocompromised, or other high-risk factor), and other long-term care facility staff and residents (e.g., group homes, assisted living).
  • End of January/Beginning of February – The following individuals should be able to receive the COVID vaccine towards the end of January: providers and staff at dental, primary care, and other outpatient settings, those who provide in-person services for adults who live with mental health conditions, “death care” professionals, adults living in group homes, and licensed healthcare workers providing in-home care. Adults age 75 and older are projected to be able to receive the vaccine in February.

South Carolina:

Governor McMaster issued Executive Order 2021-03 on January 7. Effective immediately until January 22, this Executive Order continues the State of Emergency for 15 days and declares that Executive Order No. 2020-73 (Modifying Amending Emergency Measures) is extended for the duration of the State of Emergency. First responders and 911 operators are still allowed to ask individuals requesting assistance whether they have been exposed to COVID-19. All transportation waivers for commercial vehicles and operators of commercial vehicles are still in effect.

What follows is South Carolina’s COVID-19 vaccine distribution plan. South Carolina is administering the Moderna vaccine. The full plan can be found at this link. The plan rolls out in phases as follows:

  1. Phase 1A (began Jan. 13 & Currently Ongoing) – The following individuals are able to receive the vaccine now: Healthcare Workers (including, but not limited to, home health and hospice workers, dentists and dental hygienists/assistances, pharmacists, etc.); LTCF residents and staff; admitted hospital patients age 65 and up; and all South Carolina residents age 70 and up (regardless of underlying health conditions).
  2. Phase 1B (Late Winter 2021) – Frontline essential workers (including, but not limited to, firefighters, law enforcement, corrections officers, food and agriculture workers, USPS workers, grocery store workers, teachers, etc.) will be able to receive the vaccine at this time.
  3. Phase 1C (Early Spring 2021) – South Carolina residents between the ages of 16-64 who have underlying health conditions will be able to receive the vaccine at this time.
  4. Phase 2 (Late Spring – Fall 2021) – All people who wish to be vaccinated will be able to at this time.

*All time estimates of when each phase will begin are subject to change.

January 13, 2021

Kansas:

On January 13, Governor Kelly announced she expects Phase 2 of her vaccination plan to begin by the end of the month. That phase will include people over 65, some essential workers, and those in congregate living. The state reported vaccinating 84,555 residents as of Tuesday. That is just under 3% of the population. The state was ranked last of all states for vaccine distribution earlier this month, which Kelly credited to a “reporting lag.” She also said distribution depends heavily on how many vaccines the state receives from the federal government.

Louisiana:

On January 12, Governor Edwards extended his modified Phase 2 order, keeping COVID mitigation measures in place for another 28 days, and strongly recommended that all businesses in Louisiana move to remote work for as many employees as possible, as COVID cases and hospitalizations surge in Louisiana. The Governor’s statewide mask mandate also stays in place. The Governor’s new order expires on February 10, 2021.

Louisiana’s COVID-19 restrictions include the below:

  • All Louisianans are encouraged to avoid gatherings of individuals not part of their households.
  • All businesses, private and public sectors, should have as many employees work from home as they can.
  • All restaurants are limited to 50% of their indoor capacity. Restaurants should move as much dining outdoors as they can. Social distancing is required.
  • For bars in parishes above 5% positivity, bars are closed to indoor sales and consumption but open for outdoor consumption at tables only and at 25% capacity, with a maximum of 50 people. Social distancing is required. Take-out and delivery will still be available.
  • Retail businesses may open at 50% capacity, except for essential businesses, as defined by federal guidance from the Cybersecurity and Infrastructure Security Agency.
  • Gyms may be open at 50% of their capacity.
  • Places of worship will remain at a maximum of 75% of their capacity or the number of people who can physically distance with at least six feet between each immediate household, whichever is less.
  • Barber and beauty shops, and nail salons may open at 50% of their capacity.
  • Movie theaters may open at 50% of their capacity.
  • Indoor gatherings at event/receptions centers are limited to 25% capacity or up to 75 individuals.
  • Outdoor gatherings at event/reception centers are limited to 25% capacity or up to 150 individuals when strict physical distancing is not possible.
  • All sporting events will be capped at 25% capacity.

Louisiana’s statewide mask mandate is still in place. For complete guidance on the new Phase 2, visit the Open Safely portal at opensafely.la.gov.

(Shreveport): On January 12, LSU Health Shreveport announced they are administering Pfizer’s COVID-19 vaccine to those 70 and up starting Tuesday, January 12. Officials say the process is quick and promises to help vaccinate thousands of people in the coming weeks ahead. Each vehicle enters a tent, where the people are vaccinated and then the next vehicle goes through, with workers saying the average wait time is typically a little more than one hour. They are expecting as many as two thousand people a day. Officials say they had about five thousand vaccines on site and expect to go through those before Friday. Then, they will await the next shipment of vaccines.

Anyone interested in getting the vaccine should pre-register at https://redcap.link/LSU-PUBLIC-VACCINE-SURVEY or at http://www.lsuhs.edu. Preregistration is required and essential to minimizing wait time. Everyone seeking to get the vaccine should:

  • Bring their ID and insurance information even though they are preregistered
  • Wear a mask
  • Wear clothing with easy access to upper arm where vaccine will be administered
  • Individuals will remain in car to receive vaccine allowing for safest interaction between those receiving and giving vaccine.

If you preregistered and you are under the age of 70, please note you are NOT eligible to receive the vaccine for COVID-19 at this time. Please do not come to the Fairgrounds until your age has been announced as being eligible to receive the vaccine per CDC and LDH guidelines.

Maine:

On January 13, Governor Mills announced an update to Maine’s Covid-19 Vaccination Plan. Under the new vaccine distribution plan, the following are added to Phase 1a:

  • Other Emergency First Responders & Public Safety Personnel: These individuals include, among others, firefighters, police and other law enforcement officers, as well as corrections officers.
  • Critical COVID-19 Response Personnel: These individuals include people who manufacture, distribute, process, or report COVID-19 tests, whose work, if disrupted, would severely hamper the ability of Maine or the United States to respond to the COVID-19 pandemic. More specifically, this includes people who work in-person directly on COVID-19 response at Maine CDC, which spearheads the State’s COVID-19 response, and private companies such as IDEXX, which supports Maine’s COVID-19 testing capabilities; Abbott Laboratories, which manufactures COVID-19 tests for use in Maine and across the nation; Puritan Medical Products, which manufacturers swabs for COVID-19 tests; and The Jackson Laboratory, which is conducting whole genome sequencing to detect COVID-19 variants for Maine.

Additionally, the new vaccine distribution plan updated Phase 1b to include the following:

  • Older Maine Residents: Maine will first focus in Phase 1b on vaccinating older Maine people, beginning with people age 70 and older. Next, Maine will move to vaccinate those between the ages of 65-69.
  • People with High-Risk Medical Conditions: According to Maine CDC, this population (which is yet to be determined) will be added and supply to this group will depend on vaccine supply.

According to Maine CDC, Phase 1b should begin this month and may complete by April.

Michigan:

The Michigan Department of Health and Human Services (“MDHHS”) updated its epidemic order to allow re-opening of additional activities where Michiganders can remain masked and socially distanced. The new order allows indoor group exercise and non-contact sports. The new order is effective Saturday, January 16 and will last until Sunday, January 31.

Governor Whitmer also announced a new program providing employee assistance grants for those whose employment at entertainment and recreational venues and restaurants has been affected by the pandemic. The grant program is intended to help offset some of the financial losses employees in the hospitality, entertainment, recreation, accommodation, and food service sectors may have incurred. The key highlights about the program are as follows:

  • Eligible individuals can apply for one-time grants of up to $1,650.
  • There is only a 10-day window to apply for the grant – from January 15 to January 25;
  • Details regarding the application process can be found at www.MRLAEF.ORG/MONEY; and
  • Applications will be processed through February and payments will be issued in March.

Mississippi:

In following the recommendations of the Department of Health and Human Services, Mississippi revised its vaccination plan. Now, persons age 65 and over, persons with certain chronic health conditions, and first responders are eligible for COVID-19 vaccinations. Mississippi has set up drive-thru vaccination sites, and those who are eligible can complete a form online to schedule a vaccination appointment. People may also contact their health care provider to arrange a vaccination appointment.

New York:

On January 13, Governor Cuomo announced the first three state-run vaccination sites are opening for eligible New Yorkers to receive the vaccine. The sites include the Jacob K. Javits Center, Westchester County Center and the New York State Fair Expo Center. On January 14 and 15, Jones Beach and SUNY Albany sites will also open.

(New York City): Mayor de Blasio and NYC Department of Small Business Services Commissioner Jonnel Doris announced Fair Share NYC, a targeted campaign to connect small business owners to federal relief funds. The free resources through the Fair Share NYC include: (1) daily webinars to review the PPP and EIDL Advance programs and offer guidance on how to apply, (2) one-on-one assistance to find the best financing option for each business and get help filling out applications, (3) connections to PPP lenders, and (4) information about additional federal resources.

Ohio:

On January 12, Governor DeWine reemphasized the vaccine distribution timeline for Phase 1B of Ohio's vaccination program which is set to begin next week with those ages 80 and older. Today, the Ohio Department of Health will receive information from the federal government on Ohio's vaccine allotment for the upcoming week. This information, including which providers will receive vaccines and how many, will be communicated to local health departments this evening. Each county health department, in partnership with their local emergency management agency and vaccine providers, will communicate vaccine distribution plans with the media and the public on Wednesday and Thursday. The process to vaccinate those in each county will vary depending on the provider. Some are expected to hold walk-up clinics, others may take appointments, etc.

On January 14, the Ohio Department of Health will launch a tool on coronavirus.ohio.gov to assist citizens looking for a provider that has been allotted vaccines. The tool will be searchable by zip code or county, but it will not be updated in real-time. It is critical that those eligible to receive a vaccine consult local sources to determine up-to-date vaccine availability.

Hospitals that are vaccinating their frontline healthcare workers as part of Phase 1A must complete these vaccinations by Sunday, January 17.

Week of January 18: Vaccine providers will begin receiving their first allotment of vaccines for those ages 80 and older. Vaccines will be delivered on Monday, Tuesday, and Wednesday. Each provider will begin administering vaccines the day after they receive their shipment. All vaccines must be distributed within seven days.

Week of January 25: Vaccinations are anticipated to begin for those ages 75 and up following the same process outlined above. Vaccinations will also be available to those with severe congenital, developmental, or early-onset medical disorders. Additional information on how these individuals can choose to receive their vaccines is forthcoming.

Week of February 1: Vaccinations are anticipated to begin for those ages 70 and up following the same process outlined above.

Week of February 8: Vaccinations are anticipated to begin for those ages 65 and up following the same process outlined above.

Vaccine providers are not expected to vaccinate everyone in each age group in one week. As new age groups are authorized to receive vaccinations, previous age groups will continue receiving the vaccine.

There is no centralized state sign-up form, but many local health departments have started posting pre-registration information.

Senior citizens with questions on the vaccination process are urged to contact the Area Agencies on Aging at http://www.aging.ohio.gov or by calling 1-866-243-5678.

To date, 85% of Ohio's nursing homes have been visited by a vaccine provider as part of Phase 1A. Vaccine providers anecdotally tell the Ohio Department of Health that the number of residents and staff accepting the vaccine is increasing.

On January 13, researchers in Ohio said Wednesday that they have discovered two new variants of the coronavirus that likely originated in the U.S. — one of which quickly became the dominant strain in Columbus, Ohio, over a three-week period in late December and early January. Like the strain first detected in the U.K., the U.S. mutations appear to make Covid-19 more contagious but do not seem like they will diminish the effectiveness of the vaccines, researchers said.

Researchers at Ohio State’s Wexner Medical Center have been sequencing the virus since March but have since drastically scaled up their efforts to sequence hundreds of samples per week, Jones told reporters at a press briefing Wednesday. He added that he’s sent his team’s findings to the Ohio Department of Health, but not the CDC yet. We are now in a period where the virus is changing quite substantially,” Jones said. “This is the moment, as we’re starting to see changes, where vaccination is being introduced and where the virus has been in the human population for some months, where we do want to be looking out very carefully for the emergence of not just single mutations, but new strains that have multiple mutations.”

Peter Mohler, chief scientific officer at the Ohio State Wexner Medical Center and co-author of the forthcoming study, said there’s no data to indicate that either of the new strains will impact the effectiveness of vaccines.

(Fairfield County): On January 12, the Fairfield County Department of Health announced vaccination clinics will be held each Thursday at the Fairfield County Fairgrounds starting on January 21, 2021.

Fairfield County residents who are eligible in the Phase 1B group who want to receive the vaccine must register in advance using a sign-up form here.

The health department says to meet Ohio's Phase 1B timeline, Fairfield County would need to receive more than 4,000 doses of the vaccine per week. Right now, they are only receiving 200 doses a week. The Department of Health and the Fairfield County EMA says they do have a plan in place to accommodate the increased vaccinations, including a second vaccination clinic site, if the county receives more vaccines.

Oregon:

Governor Brown expanded access to all Oregonians above the age of 65, with such vaccinations, as well as vaccinations for child care providers and Pre-K-12 educators and staff, beginning on January 23, 2021.

Governor Brown and the Oregon Health Authority announced updated county risk levels, effective as of January 15, 2021. Four counties (Baker, Clatsop, Coos, and Morrow) moved from High Risk to Extreme Risk, while two counties – Curry and Lake – moved to Moderate Risk from Extreme Risk and Lower Risk, respectively. These designations trigger certain restrictions on various activities.

West Virginia:

On January 13, Governor Justice announced that West Virginia will immediately begin offering COVID-19 vaccines to all state residents aged 70 and older. Governor Justice acknowledged that the CDC’s latest recommendation is that all states offer vaccines to those aged 65 and older, as well as those with preexisting conditions or comorbidities as soon as possible.

In working towards this goal, West Virginia has dropped the minimum age the COVID-19 vaccine is offered down from 80 to 70, with hopes that as the state receives more doses, the age will further drop to 65.

January 12, 2021

Alabama:

Alabama’s vaccination rollout plans are as follows:

1a. (Current phase) Vaccines are available for:

  • Health-care workers
    • Includes: EMS, nurses, nursing assistants, home healthcare personnel, pharmacists, technicians, therapists, phlebotomists, students, trainees, contractual staff not employed by healthcare facility, medical supply delivery, mortuary services, and those not directly involved in patient care, but “who could be expected to infection agents” (e.g., admin staff, billing staff, volunteers, etc.)
  • Long-term care residents

1b. (Beginning on January 18) Vaccines are available for:

  • Individuals older than 75
  • First Responders (fire, law enforcement)
  • Front-line essential workers
    • Grocery store workers
    • US Postal Service workers
    • Food and agricultural workers
    • Public transit workers
    • Manufacturing workers
  • Those in “congregate settings” – group homes, homeless shelters, prisoners

1c. Vaccines available for:

  • Individuals between 65-74
  • Other essential workers
  • Those 16-64 with other medical conditions that make them at risk for COVID-19.

Phase 2 – All others not yet vaccinated.

For up-to-date information, go to https://www.alabamapublichealth.gov/covid19/vaccine.html#availability

Connecticut:

Connecticut’s vaccination phases are as follows:

1a. (Current Stage) Vaccines are available for:

  • health care personnel – All persons “serving” in healthcare settings who have the potential for direct and indirect exposure to patients or infectious materials. Excludes those involved in telehealth services.
  • long term care residents—those in nursing homes.
  • medical first responder -

1b. (Vaccination of 75+ individuals expected to begin January 18) Vaccines are available for:

  • Front-line “essential” workers; subcommittee recommending rollout groups to Gov. Ned Lamont have so far considered front-line “essential workers” as First responders (fire, police, ambulance, criminal investigation, etc.), transportation and delivery workers, teachers and school staff, manufacturing workers, Department of Corrections employees, and Food and Agriculture Workers (farmers, loggers, grocery store workers).
  • Individuals and staff in “congregate settings” – prisons, homeless shelters, group homes, etc.
  • Individuals over 75 years of age.

1c. Not yet explicitly defined, but proposed category would include:

  • Individuals between 65-74
  • Other essential workers
  • Those 16-64 with other medical conditions that make them at risk for COVID-19.

Up-to-date information on vaccines can be found at https://portal.ct.gov/Coronavirus/COVID-19-Vaccination---Phases.

Delaware:

On January 8, 2021, Governor Carney signed the fifth revision to the omnibus emergency order. This revision lifts the 10 p.m. curfew for bars and restaurants, but still requires them to have signage indicating that parties from in the establishment must be from the same household and that masks must be worn. Additionally, parties can be no larger than 6 people, with up to 4 adults.

Additionally, games and competitions can resume at 30% capacity, which includes athletes, coaches, and staff. Each athlete is allowed to have one person attend who will not count towards the 30% capacity. The revision still requires that anyone participating in an out-of-state tournament must self-quarantine upon return to Delaware. The revised emergency order states that the Delaware Division of Public Health can issue cease and desist orders to teams with high levels of COVID-19 cases or failure to comply with the emergency order, and can ban all future practices, games, and matches.

The revised emergency order also continues to strongly advise that residents are to stay home as often as possible.

Georgia:

On January 11, Governor Kemp renewed the Public Health State of Emergency due to the impact of COVID-19.

Iowa:

On January 7, 2021, Governor Reynolds signed a Proclamation of Disaster Emergency continuing the public health disaster emergency and amending the existing health measures.

The following measures are effective January 8, 2021 at 12:01 a.m.:

  • Spectator limits for sporting and recreational gatherings are lifted.
  • The suspension of regulations requiring in-person clinical supervision for license as a marital and family therapist or mental health counselor is lifted.
  • The suspension of regulations requiring certain beer and wine permit holders to report the amount of beer and wine sold and pay taxes before the 10th of each month is lifted.
  • The suspension of the regulation requiring persons to timely renew their driver’s licenses and allowing persons to operate a motor vehicle with an expired driver’s license is lifted.

All other restrictions not affected by this Proclamation remain in place and are effective through February 6, 2021 at 11:59 p.m.

Additionally, Iowa Infectious Disease Advisory Council has announced COVID-19 vaccinations will be administered in the following phases:

  • Phase 1a: Healthcare personnel and residents of long-term care facilities.
  • Phase 1b: persons 75 years; older or populations vulnerable to high risk of exposure or severity of illness, including inspectors responsible for health, life, and safety and government officials and staff, with 50% of the vaccine allocation dedicated to priority age populations and individuals of all ages with co-morbidities and 50% of the vaccine allocation dedicated to the populations vulnerable to high risk of exposure or severity of illness.
  • Phase 2 and Phase 3 priorities are forthcoming.

Kansas:

(Wyandotte County): On January 12, Wyandotte County is asking residents interested in getting the vaccine to fill out an interest form to determine their eligibility. From the information provided in the survey, the department will notify residents when the vaccine is available.

The health department will use your contact information to let you know when the vaccine is available and where. Health care workers — including EMS and health department staff — and nursing home residents and staff are getting their shots first, health department officials said.

Vaccines are being doled out at a former Kmart building at 7836 State Ave., where COVID testing for the public is ongoing. More than 1,500 doses of the Moderna vaccine so far have been given to health care workers there, the health department’s director, Juliann Van Liew, said in a statement. “But we know there are still more healthcare workers in our community who haven’t come through our site yet,” she said. “That’s why we are putting the call out to healthcare employers to sign up to get their staff vaccinated.”

Wyandotte County also announced a relaxation in COVID restrictions. Bars and restaurants in Wyandotte County can remain open past midnight starting Wednesday, the Unified Government of Wyandotte County/Kansas City, Kansas, announced Tuesday. Since November, bars and restaurants there have been required to close by 10 p.m. under an emergency order issued to respond to the COVID-19 pandemic. But under the new rules, they can serve customers until midnight and remain open until 12:30 a.m. Bars and restaurants will still be limited to 50% of their normal operating capacity, and patrons will still be required to wear masks unless actively eating or drinking.

Kentucky:

On January 12, Governor Andy Beshear signed an executive order creating the Unemployment One-Time Relief Payment Program to be administered by the Office of Unemployment Insurance (OUI) and funded by Coronavirus Relief Fund money for up to $48 million. The program will provide one-time supplemental payments to claimants:

  1. $400 to claimants under any OUI program who: (a) would otherwise have qualified for 2020 FEMA Lost Wages Assistance but their weekly benefit amount was below $100, and (b) who had an approved claim in November and December 2020 but a weekly benefit amount of less than $176. Approximately 25,000 Kentuckians are eligible for this payment; and
  2. $1,000 to claimants under any OUI program between March 4 and Oct. 31, 2020, with verified identities and no indication of fraud, but whose claims were not yet adjudicated and paid. Approximately 16,500 Kentuckians are eligible for this payment.

“For those who were able to file a claim, we want to help these people until we can get to their claims,” said Governor Beshear. “And we want to help the people who were working regular, full-time jobs before this crisis but still didn’t make enough to qualify for Lost Wages Assistance when they lost their jobs.”

Louisiana:

On January 12, the Louisiana Supreme Court announced an order halting civil or criminal jury trials until March 1, 2021.

Grand jury and other in-person proceedings are not affected by the order and may continue. Local courthouses should limit access to courtrooms and other spaces to allow for physical distancing and capacity reductions. Courts are encouraged to conduct remote proceedings if possible.

Jury trials were suspended at the start of the pandemic but were allowed to proceed in July.

Maryland:

On January 12, Governor Hogan announced that the Maryland Department of Health confirmed two cases of COVID-19 in Maryland residents caused by the new SARS-CoV-2 variant strain commonly known as B-117, the strain that originated in the United Kingdom in late 2020. The strain has not been shown to cause more severe illness or increased risk of death when compared to other strains. However, the strain has been shown to be more transmissible than other strains. Additionally, there is no evidence suggesting that the currently available COVID-19 vaccines are less effective on the B-117 strain. Extensive contact tracing measures have been employed for both cases of the B-117 strain identified in Maryland, and there is currently no evidence of additional transmission of the strain.

Michigan:

Director Gordon, of the Michigan Department of Health and Human Services (“MDHHS”) signed an order relating to increased testing requirements of Michigan Nursing Home Testing Staff. The Order requires that the Michigan Department of Licensing and Regulatory Affairs (“LARA”) must demonstrate that nursing home inspection staff complete weekly COVID-19 testing and have obtained negative test results on their most recent test prior to conducting any on-site inspections.

Mississippi:

Governor Reeves signed Executive Order 1541 on January 11, 2021, which concerns unemployment benefits. It replaces and supersedes Executive Order 1510. The new Order has the following effects:

  • The one-week waiting period requirement for receiving unemployment insurance benefits is waived for all claims filed from March 8, 2020 through March 14, 2021, with the possibility of extension prior to the Order’s expiration.
  • The provision in Mississippi law which requires that all employers who elect to reimburse the trust fund in lieu of contributions may not be noncharged under any condition is amended to allow reimbursable employers to receive a noncharge if a claim was fraudulently filed for the weeks ending March 8, 2020 through March 14, 2021.

The remainder of the Order reminds Mississippi employers that they must notify the Mississippi Department of Employment Security (“MDES”) in writing within 10 days from the date they receive a refusal of an offer of suitable employment and that in order from MDES to receive emergency grants under the Social Security Act all employers must provide notification of the availability of unemployment compensation to each employee at the time of separation of employment. It continues to say that any waivers granted by Congress related to COVID-19 may be adopted and implemented by Mississippi and grants MDES the authority to seek any waivers it deems necessary in response to COVID-19.

Nevada:

On January 11, 2021, Governor Sisolak and the Nevada Department of health and Human Services released the third version of Nevada’s COVID-19 Vaccination Program Playbook. Final decisions are pending about the priority of administration of COVID-19 vaccines, but populations of focus for initial vaccination may include:

  • Healthcare personnel (paid and unpaid people serving in healthcare settings who have the potential for direct or indirect exposure to patients or infectious materials and are unable to work from home)
  • Non-healthcare essential workers
  • Adults with underlying medical conditions that are risk factors for severe COVID-19 illness
  • People 70 years of age or older

Allocation of COVID-19 vaccine to jurisdictions will be based on multiple factors, including:

  • Critical populations recommended by the Advisory Committee on Immunization
  • Practices (with input from the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and
  • Medicine)
  • Current local spread/prevalence of COVID-19
  • COVID-19 vaccine production and availability

Additionally, on January 11, 2021 Governor Sisolak extended the State’s current mitigation measures for 30 days.

New Jersey:

Governor Murphy announced that all sworn law enforcement and fire professionals in the state are now eligible to receive the COVID-19 vaccine. The emergency professionals are the first individuals in Phase 1B to become eligible for vaccination. EMS professionals were already eligible for the vaccine under Phase 1A, as health care workers.

New York:

Governor Cuomo announced that New Yorkers within the priority group 1b can now begin scheduling appointments with individual providers to receive the COVID-19 vaccine. Those eligible for the vaccine, under 1b, include individuals 75 and older, first responders, public safety officers, teachers, other school staff, and more. For more information about where to get the vaccine visit here.

On January 10, Governor Cuomo announced a proposal to prohibit utility disconnections in regions under a state of emergency. The Governor’s proposed legislation will apply to electric, gas, water, telecommunications, cable and internet services.

On January 8, Governor Cuomo announced the expansion of the state’s vaccination distribution network to help accelerate administration of the COVID-19 vaccine to New Yorkers eligible under group 1A and 1B. Essential workers and anyone over the age of 75 can begin to make vaccination reservations at administration sites on January 11.

(New York City): On January 12, Mayor de Blasio signed Executive Order 174 extending the State of Emergency declaration in New York City until January 17.

On January 8, 2021, Mayor de Blasio announced additional vaccination sites across the five boroughs. Beginning on January 10 and 11, vaccine sites will open in partnership with SOMOS and FDNY and other sites will be opened in the Bronx and Brooklyn.

North Carolina:

(Wake County): On January 12, Wake County Public Health will start vaccinating residents ages 75 and older against COVID-19 on Tuesday, January 19. Wake County Public Health said it has made significant progress in vaccinating Phase 1a and is ready to roll into Phase 1b of the process.

"We've taken a major step forward in providing protection to our healthcare workers, and now, we're poised to give the vaccine to our older residents who are at greater risk of serious health problems if they contract the virus," said Wake County Board of Commissioners Chairman Matt Calabria. "We strongly encourage anyone 75 or older to consider rolling up their sleeves and getting the shots to safeguard themselves and their loved ones from COVID-19."

To avoid long lines, Wake County has built a new tool that will allow residents ages 75 or older to express interest in getting vaccinated, and essentially reserve their place in line. Then, when supply allows, the team will reach out to them to schedule an appointment. The tool will go live in two ways on January 19. It'll be accessible on the county website and via a special phone line. The county will share the phone number and the web address, as well as more details about the process, as we get closer to January 19.

Wake County Public Health is one of five healthcare providers in the county to receive shipments of the vaccine. The others include the three local hospitals and UNC Wakebrook.

Together, the five entities have received 24,757 doses - with just 3,950 of them going to our Public Health clinic. To date, the county has administered 2,000 doses, with more than 2,000 additional doses scheduled to go in arms over the coming days.

"We're moving quickly to vaccinate as many people as we can, according to the priority order established by the state," said Dr. Jason Wittes, Wake County's Pharmacy Director. "The challenge is we never know how much vaccine we'll get from week to week, which has made planning for all the phases difficult."

Meanwhile, the county will continue answering questions from the community about the vaccine through its COVID-19 hotline - (919) 250-1500 - and its email address- mailto:covid19.questions@wakegov.com.

Ohio:

(Cuyahoga County): On January 12, the Cuyahoga County Board of Health provided a vaccine update: “Our agency is now serving the Phase 1A group by offering vaccines to those who are eligible. Due to the large number of people in our county who qualify as eligible for Phase 1A, we do not know how long it will take us to complete Phase 1A. To be notified when slots for Phase 1A and Phase 1B are available at our clinics: Please click here to provide your contact information. You will receive two notifications when clinics open up:

  • A voicemail message telling you to check your email for a link to register
  • An email message that has a link that allows you to register for the next open clinic

After you click on the link to register, you will receive a second email message that will have the date and time of your appointment.

For those who would like to volunteer at vaccination events, the board of health said visit http://www.ohioresponds.odh.ohio.gov and select the “Register Now” button on the homepage to begin the registration process. Ohio Responds is the primary way the board of health says it communicate volunteer opportunities to assist with our COVID 19 vaccination events.”

(Geauga County): On January 12, Geauga Public Health provided a vaccine update that they are contacting people on the pre-registration list for Geauga County this week to schedule upcoming clinics and asking people to be patient as the process is moving slower than anticipated.

(Huron County): On January 12, Huron County Public Health provided a vaccine update, “We had a small number of COVID-19 vaccine appointments to fill and we were quickly overwhelmed with the response from the community. We are glad that there is such demand from our residents to get the vaccine, however, we only receive a very limited quantity of vaccine each week (100 doses) which unfortunately limits our capacity. We have opened up a wait list for those in the 80+ age category that can be found at the link.”

(Medina County): On January 12, the Medina County Health Department posted a vaccine update on its Facebook page Monday: “We started scheduling the first part of phase 1B which includes citizens over the age of 80 years old. The first amount of appointments filled up quickly …. And we are not able to schedule more clinics when we don’t know how many vaccines will be allotted to us. … Pre-registration is for those 65-79 but we have not announced that process yet because we are still working with people who are 1A eligible. The system cannot accommodate 1B yet…Citizens over the age of 80 years old may begin calling the Health Department tomorrow. Vaccine clinic appointments are currently full. As vaccine delivery amounts are confirmed, the Health Department will open additional appointments and will announce that information. Our waiting list is currently full as well.”

(Stark County): On January 12, the Stark County Health Dept. said it is currently administering the vaccine to those included in Phase 1A. Information on Phase 1B is coming soon, the health department said. Follow updates, here.

(Tuscarawas County): On January 12, the Tuscarawas County Health Dept. has begun scheduling vaccinations for the week of January 18 for those on the wait list. Those 80 and older can still register for the wait list on the health dept.’s website or by calling 330-343-5555 x106.

(Wayne County): On January 12, Wayne County Health Department posted a vaccine update on its Facebook page: “As we move into Phase 1b for the COVID vaccine, the Wayne County Health Department is now accepting registration from those that fit that criteria. This includes people age 65 and older, teachers and other school personnel, and those with severe medical conditions. You can register by visiting the coronavirus page of our website. This will register you to be placed on the COVID-19 vaccine list. Once we have vaccine availability, a member of our nursing team will contact you by email or phone. If you are a K-12 School Personnel, please contact your school administration for information on your school’s vaccination plan.”

Texas:

(Austin): On January 12, Governor Abbott announced that the Texas Division of Emergency Management established an Alternate Care Site in Austin to expand hospital capacity in the region and reduce the burden on hospitals. Opening today at the Austin Convention Center, the facility will provide central Texas with additional hospital beds, medical equipment, and medical personnel to assist with the region's COVID-19 response. The facility has a capacity of 25 beds and can expand to more beds if needed.

(Austin): On January 11, increased COVID-19 restrictions went into effect in the Austin area. For the seven days prior, COVID-19 patients made up more than 15% of the total hospital capacity in the Central Texas region called Trauma Service Area (TSA) O, triggering rollbacks. The counties in TSA O are Bastrop, Blanco, Burnet, Caldwell, Fayette, Hays, Lee, Llano, San Sab, Travis, and Williamson.

Under Governor Abbott’s Executive Order GA-32, businesses in TSA O must roll back their opening capacities from 75% to 50%, elective surgeries must be put on hold, and bars not operating as restaurants must close. The restrictions will be lifted following seven consecutive days with a hospitalization rate below 15%.

Similar occupancy restrictions were previously instituted for numerous other Trauma Service Areas, notably TSA-E, which includes Dallas, Tarrant, Collin, Denton, Ellis, and 15 other contiguous counties; TSA-B, which includes Lubbock County; and the Trauma Service Areas surrounding Amarillo, Abilene, San Antonio, Houston, Longview, Lufkin, El Paso, Waco, Bryan-College Station, Galveston, and Laredo.

Washington:

On Monday, January 11, Gov. Inslee signed Proclamation 20-25.12, officially instituting “Healthy Washington – Roadmap to Recovery,” the statewide reopening plan announced last week. This plan sets restrictions on a regional level based on the status of COVID-19 within those regions. As of January 11, 2021, all eight regions are still in Phase 1, the strictest phase.

January 11, 2021

California:

Governor Newsom and the California Department of Public Health took action to continue the State’s efforts to halt the rise in COVID-19 infections and provide additional relief to California businesses.

On January 5, CDPH modified and extended the Limited Stay at Home Order issued last November so that its expiration will coincide with Regional Stay at Home Order’s termination. The modified order continues to require that all gatherings with members of other households and all activities conducted outside the residence, lodging, or temporary accommodation with members of other households cease between 10:00 p.m. and 5:00 a.m. PST. In addition, non-essential retail must now specifically cease in-person operations between the same time period.

Executive Order N-84-20 extends the availability of housing for migrant agricultural workers and provides a 90-day extension on tax returns and tax payments for small businesses. The order allows migrant farm labor centers managed by the Department of Housing and Community Development to continue housing agricultural workers and their families beyond the statutory occupancy period. It also suspends the requirement that these workers reside outside of a 50-mile radius from the migrant farm labor center for three months of the preceding six months. Further, the order authorizes the California Department of Tax and Fee Administration (CDTFA) to offer a 90-day extension for tax returns and tax payments for all businesses filing a return for less than $1 million in taxes. Small businesses will have until the end of July 2021 to file their first-quarter returns.

Colorado:

Large portions of Colorado have experienced gains in the fight against the virus in the recent weeks, which prompted the transition of many counties from Level Red to Level Orange in the Dial Framework. Following this transition, the CDPHE revised the PHO 20-36 to allow greater operations for gyms and other recreational businesses. In addition to a slight relaxation of the restrictions on social and economic activity, Governor Polis acted to extend various Executive Orders to continue the State’s fight against COVID-19.

Level Orange, which governs restrictions in the eastern half of the State and much its western areas, provides for the following restrictions:

  • Public and private gatherings are limited to no more than 10 individuals from no more than 2 households when not otherwise regulated as a specific sector or activity;
  • Critical Businesses and Critical Government Functions may continue to operate without capacity limitations, except that Critical Retail must adhere to 50% of the posted occupancy limit, but must continue to adhere to distancing and other requirements set forth in the PHO 20-36;
  • Non-Critical Office-based businesses may allow in-person work up to 25% of their posted occupancy limit, and are strongly encouraged to implement remote work to the greatest extent possible;
  • Critical and Non-critical Retail may operate at 50% of the posted occupancy limit, and should offer increased options for curbside pickup, delivery, and dedicated service hours for senior and at-risk individuals;
  • Non-critical Manufacturing may operate at 25% of the posted occupancy limit not to exceed 50 people, whichever is less, per room;
  • Restaurants may operate at 25% of the posted occupancy limit indoors not to exceed 50 people, excluding staff, whichever is less, per room, and may also use any existing, licensed outdoor space for in-person dining with a group limit of 10 and minimum spacing of 6 feet apart—on-premises alcohol consumption at 10:00 p.m.;
  • Field Services may operate, and real estate open houses must follow the Indoor Event requirements;
  • Indoor Events may operate at 25% of the posted occupancy limit not to exceed 50 people excluding staff, whichever is less, using the distancing calculator, but if the event is a seated event, the usable space may be calculated using 6-feet distancing between non-household contacts instead of using the calculator;
  • Outdoor Events may operate at 25% of the posted occupancy limit not to exceed 75 people excluding staff, whichever is less, using the distancing calculator, but if the event is a seated event, the usable space may be calculated using 6-feet distancing between non-household contacts instead of using the distancing calculator; and
  • Organized recreational youth or adult league sports are not authorized for indoor settings, but virtual services may be provided, or outdoor recreational sports in groups of 10 people or fewer may occur, maintaining 6 feet distancing requirements between non-household contacts.

The revised PHO 20-36 modified the Dial Framework to allow gyms and other recreational businesses to operate at the same capacity as restaurants in each level of the Dial Framework. PHO 20-36 remains in effect until February 4, 2021.

As noted, Governor Polis issued or extended the following Executive Orders—some with minor modifications:

  • Executive Order D 2021 001: extends the temporary relief provided to public utility customers to January 31, 2021, including the waiver of reconnection fees; the suspension of the accrual of late payment fees for residential and small business consumers; and direction to the Colorado Public Utilities Commission to provide guidance to and work with utility providers to develop aid programs for customers;
  • Executive Order D 2021 007: extends the State’s mandate that Coloradans must generally wear a non-medical face covering over their nose and mouth when in public and requiring mask wearing for employees, contractors, and others providing services for Mass Transportation Operations and Critical Businesses as well as for State and county employees and the individuals they serve at Government Offices and Facilities; the order expires on February 6, 2021;
  • Executive Order D 2021 307: extends the protects for residential and commercial tenants from late fees for failure to timely pay any portion of rent to January 31, 2021, but it also adds that any fee or penalty assessed on or after January 31, 2021, shall apply only to rent due on or after that date;
  • Executive Order D 2020 296: extends Colorado’s state of disaster emergency to January 25, 2021;
  • Executive Order D 2020 289: reenacts the State’s Dial Framework created through Executive Orders D 2020 235 and D 2020 265 for 30 days, which expires on January 27, 2021;
  • Executive Order D 2020 286: extends Executive Order D 2020 260 to January 22, 2021, which authorizes CDPHE to order hospitals and freestanding emergency departments to transfer or cease the admission of patients to respond to the current disaster emergency due to COVID-19 in Colorado within the requirements of federal law;
  • Executive Order D 2020 280: extends the authorization for executive directors of certain state agencies to promulgate and issue emergency rules extending the expiration date of licenses and other documents described in Executive Order D 2020 015 (as amended) until January 13, 2021.

Florida:

(Palm Beach County): Mayor Kerner issued a Declaration of Continuing State of Emergency further extending the state of local emergency through January 15, 2021.

Illinois:

On January 7, Governor Pritzker announced that Tier 3 mitigations may be lifted in various Illinois regions as early as next week. Regions meeting the following metrics will see the Tier 3 mitigations removed:

  • Test positivity rate less than 12 percent for three consecutive days
  • More than 20 percent of ICU and hospital beds available
  • Declining COVID-19 hospitalizations in seven of the previous 10 days

Additionally, the Illinois Department of Public Health (IDPH) has released a COVID-19 Vaccination Plan. Under the plan, vaccinations are distributed in two phases. Phase 1 of the plan is further divided into three sub-phases. Under Phase 1a, vaccinations continue to be administered to health care personnel and long-term care facility residents and staff. Phase 1b of the plan, which is set to begin in the coming weeks, covers the following individuals:

  • Persons aged 75 years and older*
  • Frontline essential workers (as defined by ACIP and directed by the State of Illinois)
  • Sheltered population, homeless/day programs, and inmates

*Governor Pritzker recently announced that the vaccine recipient age limit under Phase 1b will be lowered from 75 to 65.

Kansas:

(Johnson County): On January 9, Johnson County health officials say it will be several weeks before they can broaden the distribution of the COVID-19 vaccine to include essential workers and people over 65. The county, which is following vaccine distribution guidelines established by the Kansas Department of Health and Environment, is currently vaccinating health care workers as part of Phase 1, and demand has exceeded supply. More than 25,000 health care workers alone have registered for vaccination, but the Johnson County health department has only received 4,000 doses since December 21, officials said in a statement Friday.

The first phase of vaccines covers health care workers, as well as residents and patients in long-term care facilities and senior housing. Essential workers and people 65 and older were included in Phase 2 of the state’s final vaccine distribution plan released Thursday. It has five stages. Phase 2 is broad, including firefighters, police officers, grocery store workers, K-12 and childcare workers — teachers, custodians and other staff — transportation workers, U.S. Postal Service employees and people who work in retail and agriculture. Homeless shelters, emergency shelters and safe houses, and correctional facilities are also included in Phase 2.

In Phase 3, people age 16 to 64 with serious medical conditions that put them at high risk for COVID will be vaccinated; that includes pregnant women. Other occupations covered include utility workers, IT and communications workers.

Phase 4 includes people 16-64 with other medical conditions, including asthma, liver disease, Type 1 diabetes and obesity. Everyone else over 16, and possibly children if a vaccine for them is available by then, comes last in Phase 5.

The county will tell residents when their turn comes on its website, jocogov.org/covid-19-vaccine, through local media and on the social media of the health department and county government, health officials said. People can sign up for daily email updates at jocogov.org/coronavirus.

Kentucky:

On January 8, Governor Beshear said 107,799 initial vaccine doses have been administered across the state; 47,385 have been administered since Monday’s report, which Governor Beshear said highlights the impact of the state’s push to dramatically speed up vaccinations in the commonwealth.

“A shot that sits in a freezer for an extended period of time is no use to anyone,” said Dr. Stack. “Because it is incredibly difficult to find everyone who meet very specific, discrete criteria, and because, unfortunately, there is a substantial portion of the population who is opting to wait for the vaccine or has some concern or hesitancy about it, at the end of the day, we want every vaccination administration site to give at least 90% of the vaccine that reaches the state within seven days, even if that means moving to people in a lower priority category who are willing and able to receive it.”

Adam Mather, inspector general at the Kentucky Cabinet for Health and Family Services, provided an update on vaccine progress in the commonwealth’s long-term care facilities. As of January 7, vaccinations had been given to staff and residents in 287 long-term care and assisted living facilities. Nearly 24,000 initial doses have been administered.

“There will be significant ramp-ups and a pledge by both partners to be finished administering initial doses by January 25. Some delays in vaccinating residents have been related to COVID-19 outbreaks in facilities, but those residents will be able to be vaccinated at a later date. As the Governor mentioned, staff vaccinations remain a bit of an issue, but a caveat to that is that some of the facilities have decided to split their staff in half in case there are any reactions, so they can ensure they don’t have a staffing shortage. “With that said, I want to point out that we haven’t seen any negative side effects from residents or staff reported other than soreness.”

Furthermore, Governor Beshear signed an executive order prohibiting price-gouging, extending a previous order. This order will remain in effect for the duration of the state of emergency.

Lastly, Amy Cubbage, general counsel for Governor Beshear, said of the almost 1.5 million claims, only 90,000 initial claims across all programs have unresolved issues. “A number of those claims appear to be fraudulent claims that will never pay out, and we estimate the true number of claims in that group is approximately 30,000. Only about 5% of claimants have outstanding initial issues, with about a quarter of those having filed in the last three months,” Cubbage said. “We are also proud that we have been able to pay benefits to more than 90% of claimants, where prior to the pandemic our average payment rate was 75%.”

Cubbage also provided more information about the new federal benefits provided by Congress in December in the Continued Assistance Act. The Continued Assistance Act provided:

  • An 11-week extension of the Pandemic Unemployment Assistance program for non-traditional and contract employees, which means claimants under that program can qualify for a total of 50 weeks;
  • An 11-week extension of the Pandemic Unemployment Assistance Program, which provides some claimants who have exhausted traditional UI benefits continued benefits;
  • An opportunity to regain the Extended Benefits program; and
  • An 11-week $300 per week supplement similar to the $600 per week supplement Congress provided during the spring and summer.

She explained more about stimulus payments for unemployment insurance claimants announced by the Governor last night. The Office of Unemployment Insurance (OUI) is working on programming to get these payments out to those who qualify by the end of next week. These are one-time payments that will arrive in the same manner as regular unemployment payments, whether by direct deposit to a bank account or a prepaid debit card. There are two types of payments under this program:

  1. A $1,000 payment to people who have filed claims from March 4 through October 31 and have yet to have their claims resolved. Kentuckians are eligible if OUI has proof of identity and if their claims have not been flagged as fraudulent. Approximately 20,000 to 24,000 Kentuckians are eligible for these payments.
  2. A $400 payment to people who would have qualified for the $400 FEMA supplemental payment in August and September but did not have a benefit amount high enough to qualify under the President’s order. People who drew a weekly benefit amount of $175 or less in November and December will qualify for the $400. Approximately 60,000 Kentuckians are eligible for these payments.

“Watch the KCC website for updates on timing and more specific details about these payments,” Cubbage said. “Also, if you receive your benefits on a prepaid debit card, please check the notice on the KCC website about the upcoming change in debit card providers. There will be a lag between providers, so unless you change your payment method to direct deposit into a bank account you will receive a paper check for a short period of time. If you prefer to receive a check rather than a direct deposit, please make sure we have your correct address.”

Finally, Cubbage provided an update on overpayments to claimants. “You may remember that early in the pandemic we had some issues with mistaken payments being made to claimants, and now they’ve been asked to pay those back. As you know, the Governor asked us to find a way to forgive those overpayments because those were our mistake, not yours,” Cubbage said. “The Continued Assistance Act actually amended the federal law and allows us to waive those, but state law doesn’t at this time. So we are hoping the General Assembly will give us the flexibility to waive those payments while they are here. We look forward to working with them to achieve that.”

Louisiana:

On January 11, the Louisiana Department of Health nearly doubled the number of pharmacies and other providers administering vaccines to elderly patients across the state, as officials race to catch up with skyrocketing demand from patients over 70.

After delivering shipments of 100 vaccine doses each to 107 pharmacies last week, the Louisiana Department of Health said Monday it would send more doses to those pharmacies and 102 more this week. In all, 209 providers in all 64 parishes will get doses, the agency said, most of them pharmacies. They include 87 chain pharmacies, 93 independent pharmacies, 20 federally qualified health centers (FQHCs), and 9 health care sites.

Pharmacies only received 10,500 doses last week. This week, doses will be available from several sources. Some will be directly shipped from Moderna, some are coming from a surplus at the state’s distributor and some clinics are making their extra doses available to the public.

It was not clear Monday morning how many doses would be available at the locations. Kevin Litten, a spokesperson for the Louisiana Department of Health, said most pharmacies will receive 100 doses of Moderna's vaccine, while some in parishes without many providers enrolled received an order of 200 doses. Providers including 10 high-volume pharmacies, two federally qualified health centers and two Tier 1 hospitals placed requests for direct large shipments of 975 doses of Pfizer's vaccine.

Massachusetts:

Governor Baker-Polito’s issued Order No. 60, which extends the expiration of Order No. 59 until 12:00 p.m. on January 24, 2021. Under Order No. 59:

  • Gatherings are limited to 10 persons indoors and 25 persons outdoors,
  • Restaurants are limited to 25% of their seating capacity,
  • Indoor performance venues must remain closed,
  • Outdoor performance venues are limited to 25% capacity, but not more than 25 people,
  • Movie theaters are limited to 25% capacity, but not more than 50 people, and
  • Other businesses are limited to 25% of their capacities.

Further information on the capacity restrictions can be found here.

New Jersey:

Governor Murphy reminded all New Jerseyans that the COVID-19 vaccine will be available without cost sharing barriers. All providers must vaccinate individuals regardless of whether they have health insurance coverage or what type of coverage they have, and providers are prohibited from balance billing or otherwise charging vaccine recipients.

New Mexico:

All of but one of New Mexico’s 33 counites remain subject to the restrictions on social and economic activity imposed by Level Red of the Red to Green Framework. At the end of 2020, New Mexico Department of Health extended the Red to Green Framework and related guidance for businesses and private activities through an amended Public Health Order, which expires on January 29, 2021. Likewise, Governor Grisham issued Executive Order 2021-001 on January 8, 2021, which extends all Executive Orders issued in response to the pandemic to February 5, 2021.

New York:

The Governor’s office updated the state on vaccination efforts, by reminding the state that the first priority is healthcare workers who are on the front lines. The next priority are essential workers including police, firefighters and 75+ New Yorkers (who have the highest death rate from COVID). Police are not included in the first priority, unless they are EMS or EMT professionals. Beginning on January 4, the following will be eligible to receive the vaccine:

  • All outpatient ambulatory front-line, high risk health care workers of any age who provide direct in-person patient care
  • All staff who are in direct contact with patients (i.e., intake staff)
  • All front-line, high-risk public health workers who have direct contact with patients, including those conducting COVID-19 tests, handling COVID-19 specimens and COVID-19 vaccinations

(New York City): On January 7, Mayor de Blasio signed Executive Order 173 extending the State of Emergency declaration in New York City until January 12.

Ohio:

On January 7, Governor DeWine announced those in Phase 1B will be able to receive vaccinations beginning on Tuesday, January 19. Those 80 years of age and older will be prioritized first in this next phase, roughly totaling 420,000 Ohioans. Ohio is expected to receive 100,000 doses during the first week of distribution to Phase 1B. Vaccines for Ohioans 80 years of age and older will be administered by physicians, local health departments, hospitals, federally qualified health centers, in-home health service providers, and some retail pharmacies. As of today, the Ohio Department of Health has approximately 1,700 providers registered to distribute vaccines.

Additionally, the Ohio Department of Health will be hosting a webinar for registered providers to discuss expectations, and instructions for distribution. Additional details will be shared with registered providers in the coming days.

Governor DeWine anticipates vaccinations will be available to Ohioans 75 years of age and older beginning Monday, January 25. The following week, vaccinations will be available to those 70 years of age and older. Beginning the week of Monday, February 8 vaccinations will be available to those 65 years of age and older. “As we include other age ranges, please know that does not mean vaccinations will be complete for the previous age range,” said Governor DeWine.

The week of January 25 will also include vaccinations for Ohioans with severe congenital, developmental, or early onset medical disorders. Additional details about distribution for this group will be forthcoming.

During the week of February 1, Governor DeWine announced that vaccinations will be available for personnel in Ohio schools. The Ohio Department of Heath will send forms to Ohio superintendents to indicate their school plans to go back to in full in-person and hybrid learning by March 1, as well as indicate the number of staff they believe will choose to take the vaccination. Superintendents will also be asked if a community partner has been identified to help with the administering of the COVID-19 vaccines to school personnel.

Additional information about vaccinations can be found at coronavirus.ohio.gov.

Governor DeWine also announced that Ohio Department of Health Director Stephanie McCloud signed the Sixth Amended Director's Order to Limit Access to Ohio's Nursing Homes and Similar Facilities, with Exceptions. This revised order clarifies that in-person compassionate care visits are permitted in nursing homes and similar facilities. The new order does not change required precautions all visitors must take, including but not limited to, wearing of a facial covering and social distancing.

(Lake County): On January 9, the Lake County General Health District launched a scheduling list for anyone under the Phase 1B of the COVID-19 vaccination plan. Any Lake County resident who qualifies for Phase 1B—which is anyone who is 65 years of age and older and/or has severe congenital, developmental or early on-set medical disorders—can sign up. Residents who complete the form will then be contacted at a later date with instructions to schedule an appointment for a COVID-19 vaccination.

Residents working in K-12 schools returning to in-person learning on March 1 will be vaccinated in coordination with their school districts and should not complete this form.

Since the COVID-19 vaccine is extremely limited and the number of vaccines arriving to the county is unknown, completing the form does not guarantee a vaccine appointment.

Oklahoma:

The Oklahoma State Department of Health released a COVID-19 Vaccine Priority Population Framework. Under this framework, vaccine distribution is broken up into four Phases. Phase 1, as described below, is currently underway.

  • Long Term Care residents and staff served by the federal LTC Pharmacy Partnership Program (To be fulfilled per the federal allocation plan and distribution methods carried out via CVS and Walgreens to facilities certified by the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services. Non-CMS facilities served by the state allocation plan.)
    • Description: Workers in residential health care settings who either work in situations where risk of transmission is high or are at an elevated risk of transmitting the infection to patients at high risk of mortality and severe morbidity. Individuals living in residential health care settings that increase their risk of infection and resultant morbidity and mortality.
  • Health care workers providing direct inpatient care, including but not limited to Emergency Rooms, hospitals, Intensive Care Units, and other workers inherent to the care of patients as determined by the inpatient facility (e.g. janitorial, food service, etc.).
    • Description: Workers in acute/emergency/inpatient health care settings who either work in situations where risk of transmission is high or are at an elevated risk of transmitting the infection to patients at high risk of mortality and severe morbidity.
  • Public health staff conducting front line COVID-19 pandemic mitigation and control activities (including but not limited to nurses administering COVID vaccine, public and private lab personnel processing COVID specimens, and other public health staff inherent to the COVID testing/vaccine process with direct contact with the public).
    • Description: Workers in public health settings who either work in situations where risk of transmission is high, who themselves are unable to avoid exposure to the virus, and who play a critical role in ensuring that those with or suspected of COVID are able to be served by the public health system.
  • Oklahoma, state licensed, Emergency Medical Technicians and Paramedics.
    • Description: Workers who provide direct, emergency services to those with or suspected of COVID when rendering necessary immediate care as an extension of the direct, inpatient COVID care provided by hospitals. Oklahoma licensed personnel includes certified emergency medical responders, licensed EMTs, Intermediates, Advanced EMTs, and Paramedics.

Phase 2 has now begun, though it does not signal the end of Phase 1. The following individuals will receive the vaccination under Phase 2:

  • First responders, paid and unpaid (including but not limited to, fire departments, law enforcement, homeland security, emergency managers, and medical examiners).
    • Description: Workers who provide emergency services in some situations where exposure to infected individuals is unavoidable when rendering necessary immediate care to the public
  • Health care workers providing direct, COVID outpatient care and services, who through the course of their daily roles are not able to maintain social distancing, including but not limited to:
    • Workers providing care primarily for adults 65 and older, and/or adults of any age with comorbidities
    • Workers directly treating or screening for COVID-19
    • Workers in high-risk outpatient settings such as those performing aerosolized procedures or close examinations of the nasopharynx, dentists, speech-language pathologists, etc.
    • Workers in urgent care, outpatient facilities, primary care, federally qualified health centers, community health centers, rural health centers, pharmacies (not involved in the federal allocation plan), home health, hospice, rehabilitation services, occupational/physical therapy, etc.
    • Death care workers, involved in the handling of deceased COVID-19 persons
  • Adults age 65 and older, and adults of any age with comorbidities.
    • Description: Older adults and adults with one or multiple comorbid conditions including not limited to hypertension, obesity, cardiovascular disease, diabetes mellitus, chronic lung, liver or renal disease, cancers, who are at high risk of mortality and severe morbidity resulting from COVID infection.
  • Teachers and staff in Pre-K-12 schools and educational settings.
    • Description: Workers within public and private Pre-K-12 schools, for which exposure is very difficult to control due to the nature of their institutions, and who serve an important societal role ensuring educational needs are met.
  • Staff and residents in congregate locations and worksites including but not limited to:
    • Homeless shelters
    • Public and private, state and municipal prisons/jails, not including those facilities served by the Federal Bureau of Prisons and involved in the federal allocation plan
    • Certain manufacturing facilities with limited social distancing capacity who are critical to the maintenance of the food supply
    • Public transit systems that do not allow for appropriate social distancing
  • Public health staff supporting front line efforts, senior state, county, and city government leaders and elected officials critical to maintain continuity of governmental operations and services.
    • Description: Workers whose work is vital to the function of society and the economy, who work without adequate protection while in close proximity with coworkers and members of the public, and who are at high risk of exposure to and transmission of COVID infection.

South Dakota:

On December 18, Governor Noem signed Executive Order 2020-34. In this order, Governor Noem extended her previous suspension of certain statutes and administrative rules. Of note, these rules included many certification and licensure requirements for certain healthcare professionals and other professions otherwise subject to licensure requirements.

Governor Noem’s order also terminated Executive Orders 2020-17 (Pork Operations), 2020-23 (Alcoholic Beverage Licensing), and 2020-31 (Opportunity Scholarship Eligibility).

On December 9, Governor Noem signed Executive Order 2020-33, suspending certain regulatory and statutory requirements as follows:

  • Certain statutory provisions which require in person meetings at a physical location
  • The statutory provision which requires schools to conduct teacher and principal evaluations in order to maintain accreditation
  • The regulatory requirement that schools undergo a comprehensive review in order to maintain accreditation

The order states that it shall remain in effect for the duration of the state of emergency unless otherwise terminated or extended.

Texas:

On January 11, Governor Abbott held a press conference where he provided an update on Texas' COVID-19 vaccine distribution efforts which includes establishing hub locations across Texas to administer the vaccine. The Texas Department of State Health Services has announced the list of COVID-19 vaccination hub providers for the week of January 11. These 28 hub providers will focus on large community vaccination efforts as Texas vaccinates health care workers, people 65 and older, and those with medical conditions that put them at greater risk of hospitalization and death from COVID-19. So far, more than 1.5 million vaccine doses have been delivered to providers throughout Texas. Texas has already administered 802,507 doses. This week, Texas is set to receive nearly 940,000 doses, including nearly 200,000 first doses delivered to providers in 104 counties.

On January 9, Governor Abbott announced that the Texas Division of Emergency Management has established two new COVID-19 therapeutic infusion centers in Fort Worth and Irving. The infusion centers have been provided with Regeneron's monoclonal antibodies and bamlanivimab to treat outpatient cases of COVID-19 who meet certain criteria and who have a referral from a hospital or doctor. Previous infusion centers have been established in El Paso, Laredo, Harlingen, and Austin to help communities combat COVID-19 and reduce hospitalizations.

Utah:

On January 8, Governor Cox issued Executive Order 2021-02, which orders that teachers and staff members in Utah’s K-12 schools will be eligible to receive the COVID-19 vaccine beginning the week of January 11, 2021. Governor Cox’s executive order also provides that Utahans aged 70 and older will be eligible to receive the COVID-19 vaccine beginning the week of January 18, 2021.

Also, on January 8, Governor Cox set a goal of fully immunizing all health care providers, including long-term care facility staff and residents, first responders, public and trial health frontline workers, K-12 teachers and school staff, and adults older than 70 by the end of February. The approximate number of Utah residents from these population groups totals 412,000.

Executive Order 2021-02 details vaccine eligibility and vaccine provider requirements, including not administering the vaccine provider requirements, including not administering the vaccine to someone who has tested positive from COVID-19 within 90 days, administering each COVID-19 vaccine within seven days of receiving the vaccine; and reporting data each day by 6:59 a.m. central time.

Executive Order 2021-02 also states that vaccine provider who does comply with the order may be subject to reduced COVID-19 vaccine distribution or no distribution for future distribution periods. A COVID-19 vaccine not used within seven days of distribution is subject to redistribution. The order further provides that the Utah Department of Health will coordinate with local health departments to establish procedures to offer monoclonal antibodies to residents of long-term care facilities who have tested positive for COVID-19.

Vermont:

On December 15, Governor Scott signed Addendum 9 to Amended and Restarted Executive Order 01-20, which extended Order 01-20 through January 15, 2021. The directives set forth in Addendum 8 remain unchanged.

On November 20, Governor Scott extended the Amended and Restated Executive Order 01-20, i.e., the State of Emergency Declaration, through December 15. All other directives under Addendum 8 remained unchanged.

Washington:

The Washington Department of Health announced, on January 8, that all regions would remain in Phase 1 until at least January 18 under the Healthy Washington – Roadmap to Recovery plan released earlier this month. During Phase 1, which is the strictest phrase, indoor social gatherings are banned, indoor dining is prohibited, and indoor entertainment establishments are limited to private rentals/tours of no more than six people.

Washington Insurance Commissioner Mike Kreidler extended his emergency order regarding telehealth until February 7, 2021. This order requires health insurers to cover telehealth visits, diagnostic tests for the flu, COVID-19, and other respiratory illnesses.

West Virginia:

On January 11, Governor Justice announced that West Virginia continues to lead the nation in the rate of COVID-19 vaccine distribution and administration. Governor Justice stated that 100 percent of the first-doses of the COVID-19 vaccines West Virginia has received from the federal government have either been administered or are scheduled to be administered to a specific person during the week of January 11, 2021.

Also, on January 11, Governor Justice announced he has issued Executive Order No. 1-21, which establishes that all West Virginia public and private elementary and middle schools may reopen to in-person learning five days a week beginning January 19, 2021. Per the Governor’s order, all high schools will remain closed to in-person classes and extracurricular activities if the school’s county is designated as being red on the DHHR’s County Alert System map.

Governor Justice also issued Executive Order 2-21, which provides that winter sports teams will be able to begin practicing in-person on February 14, 2021. Games can begin on March 3, 2021.

Wisconsin:

(Madison & Dane County): On January 11, the Public Health Officer of Madison and Dane County issued Emergency Order #12, effective January 13, 2021 at 12:01 a.m. The order mirrors Emergency Order #11, however, replaces each instance of “physical distancing” with “six (6) feet”. Order #12 remains in effect until February 10, 2021 at 12:01 a.m.

Wyoming:

On January 2, Wyoming’s State Health Officer Alexia Harrist extended Governor Gordon’s mandatory face coverings initially set to expire January 9. The new orders are effective through January 25. The health order requires face coverings in the following settings:

  • Inside or in line to enter a business or state building open to the public, including healthcare facilities
  • While waiting for or riding public transportation, including ride share services such as Uber and Lyft. This includes drivers when actively transporting passengers.

Businesses are required to post notices regarding the mandatory face coverings near the entrance of the establishment and employees are required to wear them while within 6 feet of other employees or customers.

Harrist also extended the health orders for restaurants, schools, gymnasiums, personal services business, and statewide gatherings initially set to expire January 8, 2021, through January 25.

On December 7, Governor Gordon announced mandatory face coverings in certain indoor settings, reduced group sizes, and reduce business hours for certain types of businesses. The new orders took effect December 9 and extended through January 8, 2021.

On November 19, Governor Gordon announced new health orders to take effect November 24. While the new orders did not call for business closures, it did reduce the size of indoor and outdoor gatherings. According to Health Order No. 2, both indoor and outdoor gatherings without social distancing-related restrictions are restricted to no more than 25 people. If social distancing-related restrictions are in place, then indoor gatherings are limited to 25% of venue capacity with a max of 100 people and outdoor gatherings are restricted to 50% of venue capacity with a max of 250 people. Churches and funerals, in addition to other event types, are exempt.

January 7, 2021

New Hampshire:

On January 1, Governor Sununu issued Executive Order 2020-25, which is the fourteenth extension to Executive Order 2020-04. Executive Order 2020-04 declared a state of emergency due to Coronavirus (COVID-19). Executive Order 2020-25 extends the state of emergency for a period of 21 days.

New Jersey:

Governor Murphy reminded all New Jerseyans that the COVID-19 vaccine will be available without cost sharing barriers. All providers must vaccinate individuals regardless of whether they have health insurance coverage or what type of coverage they have, and providers are prohibited from balance billing or otherwise charging vaccine recipients.

New York:

The Governor’s office updated the state on vaccination efforts, by reminding the state that the first priority is healthcare workers who are on the front lines. The next priority are essential workers including police, firefighters and 75+ New Yorkers (who have the highest death rate from COVID). Police are not included in the first priority, unless they are EMS or EMT professionals. Beginning on January 4, the following will be eligible to receive the vaccine:

  • All outpatient ambulatory front-line, high risk health care workers of any age who provide direct in-person patient care
  • All staff who are in direct contact with patients (i.e., intake staff)
  • All front-line, high-risk public health workers who have direct contact with patients, including those conducting COVID-19 tests, handling COVID-19 specimens and COVID-19 vaccinations

(New York City): On January 7, Mayor de Blasio signed Executive Order 173 extending the State of Emergency declaration in New York City until January 12.

Ohio:

On January 7, Ohio officials updated Ohio’s COVID-19 Travel Advisory List. There are currently 19 states on Ohio's COVID-19 travel advisory list, including Ohio and Kentucky. People entering Ohio after travel to states reporting positive testing rates of 15% or higher for COVID-19 are advised to self-quarantine

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