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Nevada: State-by-State COVID-19 Guidance

NEVADA

February 18, 2021:

On February 17, 2021, Governor Sisolak issued Emergency Directive 038, which lifts some restrictions applicable to schools and school-related activities, effective February 18 at 12:00 a.m.

Under the Directive, once a county school district, charter school, or private school has been open for in-person instruction for at least 20 days, it may

  • increase the occupancy of school buildings or facilities to the lesser of 250 students or 75% of maximum occupancy; and
  • adopt social distancing protocols with a minimum allowable distance of 3 feet between students and 6 feet between adults and students or other adults.

The Directive permits stricter social distancing standards to be implemented, but in no event shall less restrictive standards be adopted without approval from the Nevada Department of Education and the State’s Chief Medical Officer

Further, school transportation vehicles, including school buses, may now operate at 66% capacity, provided social distancing is maintained to the maximum extent practicable

County school district, charter school, and private school students must wear a face covering unless playing outdoors with social distancing of at least 6 feet, but they may remove their masks while playing an instrument that requires the use of their mouth (excluding singing). Schools wishing to host, organize, or conduct a gathering, event, performance, or other congregation of people in excess of 250 persons must submit a Large Gathering Plan to the local health authority, Nevada Department of Education, and the State Chief Medical Officer for approval.

Full-contact and close-contact sports may resume for competitions provided that competition hosts adopt a Preparedness and Safety Plan and spectators maintain social distancing and wear facial coverings. Full-contact and close-contact sports regulated by the NIAA must comply with guidance promulgated by the NIAA. In addition, the local county school district superintendent must approve commencement of full-contact and close-contact sports in writing to the Nevada Department of Education prior to the commencement of practice for said sports, and individual schools must implement NIAA testing and mitigation plans prior to full-contact and close-contact sports and sports competitions between separate schools. Plans must require minimum weekly testing of coaches, staff, and athletes participating and implement rules and guidance for the use of face coverings by student athletes while both actively and not actively participating in the sporting activity.

February 15, 2021:

On February 14, 2021, Governor Sisolak issued Emergency Directive 037, which lays out a progressive timeline for lifting COVID-19 related restrictions in effect under previous Emergency Directives. Restrictions will be relaxed on February 15 and March 15. On May 1, Nevada will begin transitioning regulatory authority to local authorities (though statewide face covering and social distancing mandates will remain in place).

Effective February 15, 2021 at 12:00 a.m.:

  • Houses of worship may conduct in person services, but occupancy shall not exceed 50%, seating must be arranged to ensure a minimum of 6 feet of separation between congregants who do not reside in the same household, and participants (including leaders and staff) must wear face coverings.
  • Public gatherings are restricted to the lesser of 100 persons or 35% capacity.
  • Indoor private social gatherings are restricted to 10 or fewer persons, and outdoor private gatherings are restricted to 25 or fewer person, provided that all persons wear face coverings, even when social distancing is observed (excludes gatherings of persons who all live in the same household, persons experiencing homelessness, or organizations providing shelter for persons experience homelessness).
  • Arcades, racetracks, bowling alleys, miniature golf courses, pools halls, amusement and theme parks, and similar activities may allow access to the public so long as the occupancy does not exceed 35%. Food and drinks should be contained to areas designated as restaurants/food courts.
  • Libraries, museums, art galleries, aquariums, and zoos may allow access to the public so long as occupancy does not exceed 50%, all social distancing requirements are satisfied, and all interactive and/or hands-on exhibits remain closed. Food and drinks should be contained to areas designated as restaurants/food courts.
  • Gaming properties shall limit occupancy in gaming areas to no more than 35%.
  • Body art and piercing facilities may reopen to the public so long as:
    • a minimum of 6 feet of separation between customers is maintained if no walls or partitions exist between stations;
    • no more than one customer or client may be seated at any given station;
    • no walk-in customers are accepted;
    • customers waiting for appointments must wait outside the facility and maintain social distancing;
    • artists, employees, and customers wear face coverings at all times;
    • body art and piercings that require mask removal (such as work around the nose and mouth) are prohibited;
    • guests are not permitted to accompany customers; and
    • the establishment complies with all of guidelines promulgated by the Nevada Occupational Safety & Health Administration.
  • Retail stores, including grocery stores, may offer limited self-service food and drinks with mitigation measures in place.
  • A person wishing to host, organize, or conduct a gathering, event, performance, or other congregation of people in a space with fixed seating capacity of 2,500 or more may submit a Large Gathering Venue COVID-19 Preparedness & Safety Plan (“Large Gathering Plan”) to the applicable state and local authorities for events occurring on March 1, 2021 or later. Plans for events at facilities regulated by the Gaming Control Board (“GCB”) must be approved by GCB prior to the event. Plans for events regulated by the Nevada State Athletic Commission (“NSAC”) must be submitted to and approved by NSAC prior to the event. Plans for all other events at venues with fixed seating capacity of 2,500 or greater must be submitted to and approved by the Nevada Department of Business and Industry prior to the event.
    • Large gatherings may not exceed 20% of fixed seating capacity;
    • All attendees must be assigned seats (standing room only not permitted);
    • Venues must clearly delineate discrete sections that are at least 6 feet apart and isolated from one another (including through use of separate entrances/exits and facilities);
      • Event staff shall not provide service to more than 1 section.
      • Social distancing must be maintained among different parties.
      • No more than 6 persons may be seated in a single party.
  • A person wishing to host, organize, or conduct a large gathering in an area without fixed seating in excess of 250 attendees but no more than 1,000 attendees may submit a Large Gathering Plan to the applicable state and local authorities for events occurring on March 15, 2021 or later.
  • Restaurants, food establishments, breweries, distilleries, and wineries may utilize tables and serve patrons within the bar area so long as:
    • The maximum occupancy for indoor dining does not exceed 35%;
    • Customers are seated a minimum of 6 feet from customers not in the same party;
    • Parties larger than 6 may not be seated together;
    • All standing and open congregation areas that are not necessary for the preparation and service of food or beverages shall be closed;
    • Customers shall only be served via table service and may not order from the bar area;
    • Bar top seating is permitted only if barstools are placed at least 6 feet from other barstools of customers not in the same party;
    • Customers waiting to dine at the establishment are required to wait outside and practice social distancing while waiting;
    • Patrons are required to wear face coverings except while actively eating or drinking; and
    • buffets shall remain closed.
  • Gyms, fitness facilities, and fitness studios may allow access to the public so long as:
    • Occupancy does not exceed 35%;
    • Employees, trainers, instructors, and patrons wear face coverings at all times;
    • The number of patrons is limited in order to maintain social distancing;
    • The placement of equipment allows at least 6 feet of separation between patrons;
    • Group classes are limited to maintain at least 6 feet of separation between participants;
    • Contact sports are permitted only to the extent 6 feet of separation can be maintained between participants, and participants are not permitted to physically contact other participants;
    • Locker rooms are limited to 50% capacity;
    • Communal showers, steam rooms, saunas, hot tubs, and other communal facilities remain closed;
    • Pools may reopen subject to restrictions contained in Section 29 of Emergency Directive 021; and
    • Childcare facilities operate in compliance with all applicable regulations and protocols.

Detailed information regarding the restrictions applicable to each type of establishment can be found in Nevada’s updated Roadmap to Recovery and Nevada’s Guidance for Safe Gatherings. The foregoing restrictions shall remain in effect until terminated by a subsequent Directive and restrictions not revised by this Directive remain in effect.

January 19, 2021:

On January 14, 2021, Nevada Health Response released guidance to clarify which medical professionals are permitted to administer COVID-19 vaccinations, with or without supervision. All providers of medical services, including students and trainees, may administer COVID-19 vaccines provided that:

  • The individual is competent in doing so;
  • If providing injections is outside their normal scope of practice, the individual has completed the CDC’s self-paced vaccine administration course (https://www.cdc.gov/vaccines/hcp/admin/admin-protocols.html); and
  • The injections are given in a setting where potential anaphylactic reactions can be appropriately monitored by appropriately-licensed medical personnel.

January 12, 2021:

On January 11, 2021, Governor Sisolak and the Nevada Department of health and Human Services released the third version of Nevada’s COVID-19 Vaccination Program Playbook. Final decisions are pending about the priority of administration of COVID-19 vaccines, but populations of focus for initial vaccination may include:

  • Healthcare personnel (paid and unpaid people serving in healthcare settings who have the potential for direct or indirect exposure to patients or infectious materials and are unable to work from home)
  • Non-healthcare essential workers
  • Adults with underlying medical conditions that are risk factors for severe COVID-19 illness
  • People 70 years of age or older

Allocation of COVID-19 vaccine to jurisdictions will be based on multiple factors, including:

  • Critical populations recommended by the Advisory Committee on Immunization
  • Practices (with input from the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and
  • Medicine)
  • Current local spread/prevalence of COVID-19
  • COVID-19 vaccine production and availability

Additionally, on January 11, 2021 Governor Sisolak extended the State’s current mitigation measures for 30 days.

December 15, 2020:

On December 14, Governor Sisolak issued Emergency Directive 036, effective December 15, 2020 at 12:01 a.m. through March 31, 2021 at 11:59 p.m., which implements a moratorium on residential evictions in Nevada due to a tenant’s failure to pay rent or refusal to vacate the property after the expiration or termination of the lease agreement.

The moratorium protects tenants who (i) have lost substantial income, compensable hours of work, or wages, or suffered a layoff or extraordinary out of pocket medical expenses due to the COVID-19 pandemic and are unable to pay their full rent due; (ii) are likely to become homeless or forced to move into a congregate shared living situation if evicted; and (iii) expect to receive no more than $99,000 in income for calendar year 2020 (or no more than $198,000 if filing jointly), were not required to report any income to the IRS in 2019, or received a stimulus check under the CARES Act.

Eligible tenants may seek the protections afforded under the Directive by providing their landlord with an affidavit or declaration swearing under penalty of perjury that the tenant meets the foregoing criteria. This requirement may also be satisfied by CDC declarations previously provided. Any pending detainer or eviction actions against a tenant who meets these criteria shall be stayed until the expiration of the Directive if the tenant provides the court with proof that the tenant has provided the landlord with the required affidavit or declaration. A landlord may challenge a tenant’s ability to qualify for the protections if the landlord provides proof that the tenant does not meet one or more of the eligibility criteria. Additionally, a landlord may seek an exemption from the eviction moratorium under the Directive by providing the statutorily required notice of eviction along with a notice to the tenant that the landlord is seeking an exemption due to foreclosure. State guidance on the new Directive can be found here.

Additionally, on December 15, 2020, the Nevada Health Response issued updated COVID-19 safety guidance for places of worship, which can be found here.

December 14, 2020:

On December 13, Governor Sisolak announced the extension of the Nevada Statewide Pause through January 15, 2021. The restrictions under the Statewide Pause are set forth in Emergency Directive 035 and a directive mandating the extension is forthcoming. Further, Governor Sisolak announced that the new directive will include a moratorium on most residential evictions in Nevada, effective December 15, 2020 through March 31, 2021.

December 7, 2020:

On December 4, the Nevada Department of Health and Human Services announced it will receive 164,150 first-doses of the COVID-19 vaccine throughout December. These doses will be provided to hospital staff, skilled nursing facility staff and residents, and other Tier 1 individuals as outlined in Nevada’s COVID-19 Vaccination Program Playbook. The vaccine requires two doses to be fully effective, and the second doses are expected to be received 3 to 4 four weeks after the initial doses are delivered.

December 1, 2020:

(City of Henderson): On December 1, the City of Henderson announced the Henderson Restaurant Response Grant program, which will provide grants of up to $10,000 to 100 restaurants located in the City of Henderson that have been impacted by COVID-19. Grant funds may be used for costs associated with social distancing, including new seating and/or tables, redesign of indoor or outdoor space (including outdoor heating), and signage and dividers (for open or closed areas), staggered business model expenses (e.g., employee or disinfection expenses), pre-packaged food requirements, lighting or tent structures, outside waiting areas, entrance monitoring stations, reservation systems, and other materials. And modifications paid for with grant funds must be compliant with City of Henderson standards.

To be eligible for the grant, the restaurant must:

  1. Be located in Henderson;
  2. Have a physical Henderson mailing address (no PO boxes) or provide other proof the restaurant operates in Henderson; and
  3. Be required to make modifications to the restaurant or restaurant operations pursuant to Section 16 of Directive 035 in order to continue operating.

Restaurants that have received funds from rounds 1-3 of the City of Henderson Small Business Recovery Grants are eligible for this grant, so long as the cumulative total of grant funds awarded to a restaurant under these programs does not exceed $50,000.

Applications open December 1, 2020 at 10:00 a.m. and close on December 4, 2020 at 5:00 p.m. or when 200 applications are received, whichever occurs first. Grants will be awarded on a first come, first served basis and eligible restaurants may apply here.

November 24, 2020:

On November 23, Governor Sisolak issued Emergency Directive 035, which formalized the restrictions announced by Governor Sisolak on November 22, 2020.

Effective for three weeks beginning on November 24, 2020 at 12:01 a.m.:

  • Private social gatherings shall be limited to 10 people or less from no more than 2 households, whether held indoors or outdoors.
  • Public social gatherings shall be limited to no more than 50 people or 25% of the fire code capacity, whichever is less; provided that if the fire code capacity is less than 200 people but at least 50 people, the gathering may still be held with up to 50 people if able to be conducted in a manner consistent with required social distancing.
  • Food and beverage establishments, including but not limited to restaurants, bars, pubs, wineries, distilleries, and breweries shall be limited to 25% occupancy based on the applicable fire code, reservations shall be required if the establishment sells food, tables must be limited to no more than 4 people per table, and face coverings must be worn at all times except when actively eating or drinking.
  • Gyms, fitness studios, dance studios, martial arts studios, and similar establishments shall be limited to 25% occupancy based on the applicable fire code, social distancing must be maintained, face coverings must be worn at all times regardless of the physical activity, and locker rooms, showers, and other communal facilities must remain closed to the public (with the exception of pools and child care facilities that comply with the Directives).
  • Gaming establishments shall be limited to 25% occupancy based on the applicable fire code and must operate pursuant to requirements issued by the Nevada Gaming Control Board, including health and safety policies.
  • Arcades, racetracks, bowling alleys, mini golf, amusement & theme parks, libraries, museums, art galleries, aquariums, zoos, and similar activities shall be limited to 25% occupancy based on the applicable fire code.
  • Retail stores shall be limited to 50% occupancy based on the applicable fire code, and retail and grocery stores with over 50,000 square foot capacity must have persons at all public entrance counting the number of patrons in order to manage capacity, maintain health screening signage at all public entrances, and are encouraged to conduct temperature screenings before entry.
  • In addition to the restrictions applicable to public social gathering, live entertainment venues must ensure all attendees are seated and the venue must maintain at least 25 feet of space between the artists and the audience.
  • All businesses and venues subject to capacity limitations must post signs at public entrances identifying their COVID-19 adjusted capacity based on the occupancy limitations imposed by the Directive.

November 23, 2020:

On November 22, Governor Sisolak announced the Nevada Statewide Pause restrictions aimed at helping slow the spread of COVID-19 in Nevada, which will be in effect for three weeks beginning on November 24, 2020 at 12:01 a.m. An emergency directive formalizing these restrictions is forthcoming. The new restrictions are as follows:

  • Private social gatherings shall be limited to10 people or less from no more than 2 households, whether held indoors or outdoors.
  • Public social gatherings shall be limited to no more than 50 people or 25% of the fire code capacity, whichever is less; provided that if the fire code capacity is less than 200 people but at least 50 people, the gathering may still be held with up to 50 people if able to be conducted in a manner consistent with required social distancing.
  • Food and beverage establishments, including but not limited to restaurants, bars, pubs, wineries, distilleries, and breweries shall be limited to 25% occupancy based on the applicable fire code. Reservations shall be required if the establishment sells food, tables must be limited to no more than 4 people per table, and face coverings must be worn at all times except when actively eating or drinking.
  • Gyms, fitness studios, dance studios, martial arts studios, and similar establishments shall be limited to 25% occupancy based on the applicable fire code and face coverings must be worn at all times, regardless of the physical activity.
  • Gaming establishments shall be limited to 25% occupancy based on the applicable fire code and must operate pursuant to requirements issued by the Nevada Gaming Control Board, including health and safety policies.
  • Arcades, racetracks, bowling alleys, mini golf, amusement & theme parks, libraries, museums, art galleries, aquariums, zoos, and similar activities shall be limited to 25% occupancy based on the applicable fire code.
  • Retail stores shall be limited to 50% occupancy based on the applicable fire code, and retail and grocery stores with over 50,000 square foot capacity must have persons at all public entrance counting the number of patrons in order to manage capacity, maintain health screening signage at all public entrances, and are encouraged to conduct temperature screenings before entry.

November 17, 2020:

(City of Henderson): On November 16, the City of Henderson began accepting applications for round 3 of its Small Business Recovery Grant program. Home based businesses or businesses licensed at an approved executive suite or virtual office may be awarded up to $2,000. Businesses with a physical commercial location may be awarded amounts ranging from $2,500 to $40,000, depending on the number of full-time equivalent employees. The grant funds may be used for working capital, including the payment of rent, utilities, inventory, payroll, and other operating expenses incurred in connection with the services provided by the business.

To be eligible for the grant, the business must:

  1. be headquartered in the City of Henderson;
  2. have an active City of Henderson business license;
  3. have been in business and operating by March 1, 2020; and
  4. have had 100 or fewer full-time equivalent employees as of March 1, 2020.

The following businesses are not eligible to receive to receive a grant under the Henderson Recovery Grant:

  1. Business that have received funding from the Henderson Small Business Recovery Grant (Round One) or the Henderson Recovery Grant (Round Two)
  2. Non-Profit Organizations with no paid employees;
  3. Businesses that have Federal, State or Local Tax Liens;
  4. Businesses with over 100 full time employees;
  5. Adult Oriented Businesses;
  6. Cannabis Related Businesses;
  7. Massage Establishments and Massage Therapists;
  8. Liquor Stores;
  9. Bail Bonds;
  10. Real Estate Agents;
  11. Food Truck Vendors, Mobile Catering or businesses licensed at a commissary;
  12. Check Cashing Facilities; and
  13. Payday Loan and other Short-Term Loan Operators.

Applications will be accepted until funds are expended and funds are available on a first come, first served basis. Eligible businesses may apply for the Small Business Recovery Grant here.

November 11, 2020:

On November 10, Governor Sisolak held a press conference to provide an update on Nevada’s COVID-19 response. Governor Sisolak instructed Nevadans to operate in “Stay at Home 2.0” mentality in an effort to curb the increasing COVID-19 infection rate in the state, and therefore advised all Nevadans to avoid gatherings, telework to the extent feasible, stay home as much as possible, and limit exposure to the public. Governor Sisolak will reevaluate the state of affairs in Nevada in 14 days, and if the state continues to see a rise in new cases of COVID-19, then the Governor will implement additional restrictions at that time.

October 19, 2020:

On October 15, Nevada Health Response issued a revised version of the Nevada Guidance for Safe Gatherings to allow vocal performers to temporarily remove their face coverings during performances in businesses, public spaces, and theaters when a face covering cannot be worn due to the nature of the performance, as long as social distancing is always maintained. The revised guidance also expands the definition of vocal performers to include all performers who rely on the ability to communicate verbally with their audience and the ability of their audience to interpret such verbal communication, including but not limited to singers, comedians, and magicians.

October 14, 2020:

The Nevada Governor’s Office of Economic Development will begin accepting applications for the Pandemic Emergency Technical Supports (PETS) grant on October 19, 2020 at 8:00 a.m. The PETS grant program makes $20 million in Corona-virus Relief Funds available to provide operational support to small businesses, non-profits organizations, arts and culture organizations, and local Chambers of Commerce impacted by the COVID-19 pandemic. Eligible businesses and non-profits may be awarded up to $10,000 and Chambers of Commerce and Arts and Culture organizations may be awarded up to $20,000. Award funds may be used to cover expenses related to working capital (rent, inventory, payroll, utilities, etc.), personal protective equipment, supplies for cleaning and sanitation, and expenses related to retrofitting the business in order to comply with social distancing and other health guidelines in connection with COVID-19.

To be eligible for the grant, the business must:

  1. Have experienced and can demonstrate financial hardship due to COVID-19;

  2. Have a physical location in Nevada (include home-based businesses); and

  3. Have an active business license prior to March 1, 2020 and be in good standing with the State (no liens or judgments, etc.).

If the business is a for-profit business, the following two additional eligibility requirements apply:

  1. The business may not have more than 50 employees; and

  2. The business’s annual gross revenue must be less than $4 million.

Applications will be accepted beginning October 19, 2020 at 8:00 a.m. through November 2, 2020 at 5:00 p.m. Eligible residents may apply for the PETS grant here.

October 7, 2020:

On October 6, the City of Henderson began accepting application under its Resident Recovery Grant program, which is funded by a $4.7 million award from the CARES Act. There are three grants, each of which are available to City of Henderson residents that have been financially impacted by COVID-19 as further detailed below:

  1. Utilities: up to $1,000 per household if the applicant’s ability to pay for utilities has been impacted by COVID-19 and the applicant is in jeopardy of losing essential utilities like water, sewer, energy, gas, etc.
  2. Childcare: up to $2,700 per household if the applicant’s ability to pay for childcare has been impacted by COVID-19.
  3. Educational Internet: up to $360 per household if the applicant’s ability to pay for K-12 educational internet service for children up to 21 years old has been impacted by COVID-19.

Applications will be accepted through November 30, 2020 and funds are available on a first come, first served basis until funds are expended. Eligible residents may apply for the Resident Recovery Grant here.

October 6, 2020:

On October 2, Governor Sisolak issued Emergency Directive 034 to be effective on October 3, 2020 at 12:01 a.m., which lifts restrictions on youth and non-professional adult sporting activities that are minimal-contact or non-contact. The sporting activities must adhere to the gathering restrictions applicable to venues with fixed seating capacity as set forth in Directive 033 and event organizers must ensure that all spectators maintain social distancing and wear a facial covering.

Full-contact sports may resume only on a limited basis for athletic conditioning, drills, and practices in which equipment is used that does not require the athletes to come into contact with other players. Emergency Directive 034 also allows county school districts, charter schools, and private schools to permit the use of their fields and facilities for games or practices. Leagues and associations that intend to host games pursuant to Emergency Directive 034 must submit to the Nevada Department of Business and Industry for approval, a Preparedness and Safety Plan that conforms to the guidelines promulgated pursuant to Emergency Directive 034, prior to hosting any games. Emergency Directive 034 does not apply to any sporting events regulated by the Nevada State Athletic Commission or the National Collegiate Athletic Association and allows student athletics to resume when permitted by the Nevada Interscholastic Activities Association.

October 1, 2020:

On September 30, Governor Sisolak issued Emergency Directive 033, effective October 1, 2020 at 12:01 a.m. The Directive increases the limits on gathering sizes for most businesses (including schools) from 50 people to 250 people or 50% of fire code capacity, whichever is less, so long as social distancing and all other requirements can be maintained. Businesses with a fire code capacity of less than 100 people may allow access to up to 50 people if they are able to do so in a manner consistent with social distancing guidelines. Certain venues may host more than 250 people if additional requirements are met, including the submission of a large gathering venue Covid-19 preparedness and safety plan for approval prior to hosting any large events or gatherings.

Venues with fixed seating capacity for more than 2,500 people may host up to 10% of the fixed seating capacity if (i) sections of 250 individuals maximum are established; (ii) social distancing can be maintained; (iii) a large gathering venue Covid-19 preparedness and safety plan is submitted and approved, (iv) standing room only is prohibited; (v) general admission is prohibited; and (vi) walk-ins, impromptu purchases, and day-of will call pickups are prohibited.

Conferences, conventions, trade shows, professional seminars, or similar gatherings may host up to 1,000 people if (i) the venue has the ability to separate the attendees among individual areas that hold no more than 250 people or 50% capacity, whichever is less, in addition to other; (ii) venue staff and employees are restricted to working in one individual area, (iii) each individual area has floor to ceiling walls, (iv) each individual area has separate entrances and exits, (v) all attendees are pre-registered, (vi) shared use of restroom facilities, concession, and merchant stands is minimized, (vii) and a large gathering venue Covid-19 preparedness and safety plan is submitted and approved.

The State of Nevada has issued controlling Guidance for Safe Gatherings to accompany the requirements set forth in the governor’s order, and additional guidance for large gathering venues, places of worship, and gatherings at private residences.

Effective October 5, 2020, all businesses and venues subject to the state capacity limitations must post signs at public entrances identifying their COVID-19 adjusted capacity based on the foregoing limitations.

Additionally, the Emergency Directive allows for public access to playgrounds and the resumption of in-person showings and open houses for single-family and multi-family residences, subject to certain social distancing limitations.

(City of Henderson): The City of Henderson has developed a business support grant using federal CARES Act Relief Funds called the Henderson Recovery Grant. The grant awards range from $2,500 to $40,000, are based on the number of full-time equivalent employees, and will be awarded on a first come, first served basis until funds are expended. The grant funds may be used for working capital, including the payment of rent, utilities, inventory, payroll, and license fees.

To be eligible for the grant, the business must:

  1. be headquartered in the City of Henderson;
  2. have an active City of Henderson business license with a physical commercial business address;
  3. have a physical location;
  4. have been in business and operating by March 1, 2020; and
  5. have had 100 or fewer full-time equivalent (FTE) employees as of March 1, 2020.

The following businesses are not eligible to receive to receive a grant under the Henderson Recovery Grant:

  1. Businesses that have received grant award funds through the Henderson Small Business Recovery Grant;
  2. Businesses licensed at a virtual office/executive suite (unless the business has a lease for a designated suite);
  3. Home-Based Businesses (i.e., a home occupation permit used for City license);
  4. Non-Profit Organizations with no paid employees;
  5. Businesses that have Federal, State or Local Tax Liens;
  6. Businesses with over 100 full time employees;
  7. Adult Oriented Businesses;
  8. Cannabis Related Businesses;
  9. Massage Establishments and Massage Therapists;
  10. Liquor Stores;
  11. Bail Bonds;
  12. Real Estate Agents;
  13. Food Truck Vendors, Mobile Catering or businesses licensed at a commissary;
  14. Check Cashing Facilities; and
  15. Payday Loan and other Short-Term Loan Operators.

Applications open October 1, 2020 and close on October 15, 2020 at 5:00 p.m.

September 30, 2020:

On September 29, Governor Sisolak issued Emergency Directive 033, to be effective October 1, 2020 at 12:01 a.m. The Directive will increase the limits on gathering sizes from 50 people to 250 people or 50% of fire code capacity, whichever is less, so long as social distancing and all other requirements can be maintained. Certain venues may host more than 250 people if additional requirements are met, including the submission of a large gathering venue COVID-19 preparedness and safety plan for approval prior to hosting any large events or gatherings.

Venues with fixed seating capacity for more than 2,500 people may host up to 10% of the fixed seating capacity if (i) sections of 250 individuals maximum are established; (ii) social distancing can be maintained; (iii) a large gathering venue COVID-19 preparedness and safety plan is submitted and approved, (iv) standing room only is prohibited; (v) general admission is prohibited; and (vi) walk-ins, impromptu purchases, and day-of will call pickups are prohibited.

Conferences, conventions, trade shows, professional seminars, or similar gatherings may host up to 1,000 people if (i) the venue has the ability to separate the attendees among individual areas that hold no more than 250 people or 50% capacity, whichever is less, in addition to other; (ii) venue staff and employees are restricted to working in one individual area, (iii) each individual area has floor to ceiling walls, (iv) each individual area has separate entrances and exits, (v) all attendees are pre-registered, (vi) shared use of restroom facilities, concession, and merchant stands is minimized, (vii) and a large gathering venue COVID-19 preparedness and safety plan is submitted and approved.

The State of Nevada has issued controlling Guidance for Safe Gatherings to accompany the requirements set forth in the governor’s order, and additional guidance for large gathering venues, places of worship, and gatherings at private residences.

September 21, 2020:

On September 17, Nevada Health Response released an updated list of counties that are considered to have an elevated risk of transmission of COVID-19. In accordance with New Normal Plan, counties on the high transmission risk list must create action plans targeting sources of infection and community spread and submit the plans for review and approval by the Nevada COVID-19 Mitigation and Management Task Force. Eureka, Churchill, and Washoe County have dropped off the list and Lyon and Mineral County have been added to the list. The following 4 counties remain flagged as high-risk counties: Clark County, Elko County, Lyon County, and Mineral County.

Additionally, the Task Force approved Clark County and Elko County’s plans to reopen bars, pubs, taverns, breweries, distilleries, and wineries with certain restrictions in place, to be effective beginning on September 20, 2020 11:59 p.m. At a minimum, the reopened businesses must follow statewide standards and enforcement measures, which include required face coverings for employees and customers, a 50% capacity limit, and that all standing and open congregation areas in bars that are not necessary for the preparation and service of food or beverages remain closed, including but not limited to areas for games or dancing. Clark County’s additional COVID-19 protocols for establishments that sell alcohol can be found here.

September 14, 2020:

On September 10, Nevada Health Response released an updated list of counties that are considered to have an elevated risk of transmission of COVID-19. In accordance with Nevada’s New Normal Plan, counties on the high transmission risk list must create action plans targeting sources of infection and community spread and submit the plans for review and approval by the Nevada COVID-19 Mitigation and Management Task Force. Lander, Lyon, and Nye County have dropped off the list and Eureka County has been added to the list for the first time. The following 5 counties remain flagged as high-risk counties: Churchill County, Clark County, Elko County, Eureka County, and Washoe County.

Because Nye County has been removed from the list, bars in the City of Pahrump were permitted to reopen at 50% capacity effective midnight on September 10, 2020, subject to statewide mitigation efforts that include required face coverings for employees and customers.

Additionally, the Task Force approved Washoe County’s plan to reopen bars, pubs, taverns, breweries, distilleries and wineries with certain restrictions in place. The measure will go into place no later than 11:59 p.m. on September 16, 2020, and will be subject to statewide mitigation efforts that include a 50% capacity limit and required face coverings for employees and customers.

On September 11, Governor Steve Sisolak signed Emergency Directive 032, which provides that DMV non-commercial driver's licenses, identification cards, non-commercial instruction permits, and driver authorization cards, that have an expiration date between March 12, 2020 and November 12, 2020 shall be deemed valid through November 12, 2020 at 11:59 p.m.

(Clark County): Clark County will begin accepting a second round of applications under its Small Business Stabilization Grant program beginning September 15, 2020 through September 29, 2020. Grants will be awarded in an amount up to $5,000 for businesses with 1-4 employees and up to $10,000 for businesses with 5-20 employees. The grants may be used for working capital, which includes expenses such as rent, utilities, inventory, payroll, and license fees. Priority will be given to businesses that have received less than $25,000 total in federal, state or local COVID related grant or loan dollars. To be eligible for the grant, the business must:

  1. Be located within unincorporated Clark County;
  2. Have 20 or less full-time employees as of March 15, 2020;
  3. Have an active Clark County business license;
  4. Have been operating on or before September 15, 2019;
  5. Have an actual financial hardship; and
  6. Not have any federal, state, or county tax liens.

The following businesses are not eligible to receive a grant under the Small Business Stabilization Grant program.

  1. Businesses within City of Las Vegas, Henderson, North Las Vegas, Mesquite and Boulder City;
  2. Adult oriented businesses;
  3. Cannabis related businesses;
  4. Massage parlors;
  5. Liquor stores;
  6. Bail bonds;
  7. Check cashing facilities;
  8. Payday loan, title loan and other short-term loan operators;
  9. Convenience stores;
  10. Non-profit organizations; and
  11. State & federal certified labor unions.

Eligible businesses can apply for a Small Business Stabilization Grant here.

September 8, 2020:

On September 3, Nevada Health Response released an updated list of counties that are considered to have an elevated risk of transmission of COVID-19. In accordance with Nevada’s New Normal Plan, counties on the high transmission risk list must create action plans targeting sources of infection and community spread and submit the plans for review and approval by the Nevada COVID-19 Mitigation and Management Task Force. Humboldt County did not meet the high-risk criteria for the second week in a row, and the following 7 counties remain flagged as high-risk counties: Churchill County, Elko County, Washoe County, Clark County, Nye County, Lander County, and Lyon County.

September 1, 2020:

On August 31, Governor Steve Sisolak signed Emergency Directive 031, which prohibits the initiation of a nonpayment of rent summary eviction action by service of a pay or quit notice for 45 days, through October 14, 2020 at 11:59 p.m. Emergency Directive 031 also terminates Emergency Directive 008 and Emergency Directive 025, both of which previously governed Nevada’s eviction moratorium. Guidance for tenants and landlords under Emergency Directive 031 can be found here.

August 31, 2020:

On August 27, Nevada Health Response released an updated list of counties that are considered to have an elevated risk of transmission of COVID-19. In accordance with Nevada’s New Normal Plan, counties on the high transmission risk list must create action plans targeting sources of infection and community spread and submit the plans for review and approval by the Nevada COVID-19 Mitigation and Management Task Force. Humboldt County was removed from the list for the first time, and the following 6 counties remain flagged as high-risk counties: Churchill County, Elko County, Washoe County, Clark County, Nye County, Lander County.

August 26, 2020:

On August 26, Governor Steve Sisolak granted authorization to the State Department of Employment, Training and Rehabilitation to start the application process for the Lost Wages Assistance program.

August 17, 2020:

On August 14, Governor Steve Sisolak formalized the previously announced Road to Recovery: Moving to a New Normal plan via Directive 030.

August 4, 2020:

Governor Steve Sisolak and State COVID-19 Response Director, Caleb Cage, rolled out Nevada’s new long-term mitigation plan. Governor Sisolak said the plan will still be “state managed” but “locally executed.” In summary, the nine-page plan provides that:

  • Each week, the state will update the Elevated Disease Transmission Criteria for each county, which includes testing, case rates, and positivity rates.
  • High risk counties will need to create and implement an action plan targeting sources of infection and community spread.

Governor Sisolak added that until the action plans are finalized, the current restrictions on bars and taverns in certain counties will remain in place.

August 3, 2020:

Governor Steve Sisolak signed Emergency Directive 029 that extends previously issued directives that were set to expire on July 31, 2020. These directives include continuing statewide standards limiting business occupancy to 50% of fire code capacity and limiting gatherings to no more than 50 people. As previously announced on July 20, bars, pubs and taverns in certain Nevada counties identified as having an elevated transmission risk will continue to remain closed. The directive also allows public bodies to continue to conduct their business safely by extending the provisions of Emergency Directive 006 providing alternative ways for boards, commissions, and agencies to allow public participation.

July 29, 2020:

Governor Steve Sisolak signed Emergency Directive 028 in support of a safe and efficient return to school buildings for the 2020-21 school year. The directive shifts the minimum physical distancing requirements from six to three feet for pre-K, kindergarten, and middle school students, and sets in place a process to allow variances from specific health and safety protocols in areas where community COVID-19 transmission rates are sufficiently low. The directive also:

  • makes face coverings mandatory for all K-12 students and all school staff. Exemptions may be approved by school building leaders if medical conditions are documented by a medical professional.
  • makes face coverings mandatory, without exceptions, for all other adults in school settings, including parents, vendors, volunteers, visitors, and others.
  • requires students and staff to follow quarantine and isolation protocols and guidelines when a positive COVID-19 case, presumptive case, or contact with a presumptive case occurs.

July 28, 2020:

Governor Steve Sisolak announced that Nevada will transition to a long-term mitigation strategy, which will be rolled out next Monday, August 3. The new, long-term strategy will include the following key components:

  • Updated criteria: will adjust current criteria to more cleanly follow overall trends; minimize the week-to-week or day-to-day fluctuation for counties; and better demonstrate which counties are getting progressively better or worse, and therefore which should tighten up or loosen mitigation efforts.
  • Predictability: will create a long-term system of mitigation levels that will allow Nevada businesses and residents to have advanced notice and understanding on what direction their county could be heading based on updated criteria.
  • No more phases: in an effort to create more predictability, the Governor expressed that the new long-term strategy will move away from phases.
  • Increased enforcement: the new long-term strategy will have the goal of stricter enforcement of safety rules and tougher consequences for those that have a pattern of not following the mitigation rules.
  • Targeting: the new plan will provide more specific targeting in mitigation efforts, specifically targeting counties, businesses, and industries that have shown the need for additional assistance and intervention.

Additionally, the Governor announced that Clark, Elko, Nye, and Washoe counties, which previously needed to take the additional mitigation efforts of closing bars, pubs, taverns, and wineries, must continue those measures for another week. Humboldt, Lander, and Lyon counties have shown enough improvement on the existing criteria to return to the statewide standards—meaning pubs, bars and taverns in those counties can reopen at 50 percent capacity while maintaining social distancing and mandatory face coverings, effective immediately. These measures will be effective until the new long-term mitigation strategy is announced week.

July 20, 2020:

Governor Steve Sisolak updated the Phase 2 guidance for Nevada’s Roadmap to Recovery, including Industry-specific guidance.

As of July 10, 2020, the new food establishment guidance requires face coverings except for when restaurant patrons are actively eating, drinking, or smoking or under other exemptions established by Directive 024.

Governor Sisolak also updated the bar guidance that as of July 10, 2020, in counties determined to have Elevated Disease Transmission, bars, pubs, taverns, breweries, distilleries, and wineries that don’t serve food must close. In counties determined to have Elevated Disease Transmission, bars, pubs, taverns, breweries, distilleries, and wineries that do serve food must close bar tops and bar areas and limit table seating to parties of 6 or fewer.

July 13, 2020:

Governor Steve Sisolak announced that bars in certain Nevada counties must close as of 11:59 p.m. Friday, July 10, to help stem the spread of COVID-19 in Nevada.

July 1, 2020:

Governor Steve Sisolak signed Emergency Directive 026, which will extend Phase 2 of the state’s Nevada United: Roadmap to Recovery reopening plan until the end of July.

The directive provides that DMV documents that expired between March 12 and July 15 will be valid through September 13, 2020.

Directive 26 allows courts to move towards normal operations as they reopen to the public by allowing some collections actions to resume and lifting the freeze on statutes of limitations. Businesses that have not paid license renewal fees since the beginning of the State of Emergency will have a grace period through September 30, 2020 to pay without penalties.

This directive also allows public bodies to continue to conduct business safely by extending the Open Meeting Law provisions of Directive 6 providing alternative ways for boards, commissions, and agencies to allow public participation.

This Directive shall remain in effect through July 31, 2020 at 11:59 pm.

June 30, 2020:

Governor Steve Sisolak signed Emergency Directive 026, which will extend Phase 2 of the state’s Nevada United: Roadmap to Recovery reopening plan until the end of July.

The directive provides that DMV documents that expired between March 12 and July 15 will be valid through September 13, 2020.

Directive 26 allows courts to move towards normal operations as they reopen to the public by allowing some collections actions to resume, and lifting the freeze on statutes of limitations. Businesses that have not paid license renewal fees since the beginning of the State of Emergency will have a grace period through September 30, 2020 to pay without penalties.

This directive also allows public bodies to continue to conduct business safely by extending the Open Meeting Law provisions of Directive 6 providing alternative ways for boards, commissions, and agencies to allow public participation.

This Directive shall remain in effect through July 31, 2020 at 11:59 p.m.

June 29, 2020:

Governor Steve Sisolak signed Emergency Directive 025, which will gradually lift the moratorium on evictions. Directive 025 lifts the moratorium on evictions and foreclosures imposed by Directive 008 in phases by allowing residential evictions and foreclosures to resume in full on September 1 for non-payment of rent and no cause evictions. Late fees or penalties for non-payment of rent or mortgage payments may not be charged retroactively. For commercial tenancies and mortgages, landlords and lenders can again charge late fees, initiate lockouts, or start eviction actions for non-payment of rent or foreclosure proceedings beginning July 1.

The directive is effective July 31, 2020 at 11:59 p.m. and shall remain in effect until August 31, 2020 at 11:59 p.m.

June 25, 2020:

Governor Steve Sisolak signed Directive 024 requiring all people to wear face coverings while in public, to help prevent the spread of COVID-19. The order will have limited exceptions for the following people who are: (1) under the age of 9; (2) experiencing homelessness; (3) having a medical condition or disability and thus cannot wear a face covering; (4) facing risks related to work when wearing a face covering; (5) required to remove mask temporarily to perform their services; (6) eating or drinking in restaurants, provided they are at least six feet away from other patrons; (7) engaging in outdoor work or recreational activities such as swimming, walking, hiking, bicycling or running; and (8) incarcerated.

The governor also clarified that Nevada would not be moving into Phase 3 until the percentage of positive COVID-19 cases stabilizes and shows a downward trajectory.

The directive is effective at 11:59 p.m. Thursday, June 25 and shall remain in effect until terminated by a subsequent directive.

June 23, 2020:

Governor Steve Sisolak signed an emergency regulation that went into effect on June 22, 2020 to extend the expiration date on educator licenses for up to a year. It enables school districts to hire teachers who would otherwise have been unable to renew their licenses due to the COVID-19 pandemic.

June 11, 2020:

Governor Steve Sisolak announced that on June 11, 2020, local governments may permit the usage of outdoor fields and facilities for sports without spectators but usage must not result in a gathering of 50 or more people. Sports that involve contact may resume only on a limited basis for athletic conditioning.

June 10, 2020:

Governor Steve Sisolak announced that on June 10, 2020, Nevada schools may re-open for various purposes but must ensure occupancy of less than 50% of the listed fire code of a single space.

June 4, 2020:

Governor Steve Sisolak again revised the industry-specific guidance on Phase 2 for the following industries to specifically address specific questions businesses may have: (1) aquatics; (2) bars; (3) bowling alleys; (4) camps; (5) closed events; (6) farmer’s markets; (7) fitness; (8) community and faith-based organizations; (9) guest rooms; (10) indoor malls; (11) indoor venues; (12) movie theatres; (13) outdoor equine and livestock competitions; (14) outdoor venues; (15) personal services; and (16) trade schools and technical schools.

As for the progress of Phase 2, Governor Sisolak announced that the state has seen a downward trajectory of COVID-19 cases and decrease in the trend of COVID-19 hospitalizations over a 14-day period. Additionally, in May, Nevada increased daily testing by 500% and Nevada has the testing and laboratory capacity to test all patients, regardless of whether they are experiencing COVID-19 symptoms or not. Governor Sisolak added that Nevada’s statewide contact tracing effort involves a digital tracing solution through Deloitte and Salesforce. This effort, supported by these national technology leaders, will modernize and streamline case investigation and contact tracing with increased staffing to quickly identify and notify individuals who may have been close contacts to a person with COVID-19.

June 3, 2020:

Governor Steve Sisolak announced Nevada’s COVID-19 Disease Outbreak Management Strategy and Concept of Operations for how the state will handle COVID-19 going forward.

June 2, 2020:

Governor Steve Sisolak announced the approval of a comprehensive community-based testing, laboratory analysis, and contact tracing plan to support local, statewide, and tribal efforts to reopen and keep the Nevada economy open.

June 1, 2020:

Governor Steve Sisolak released revised industry-specific guidance on Phase 2 for the following industries to specifically address specific questions businesses may have: (1) aquatics; (2) bars; (3) bowling alleys; (4) camps; (5) closed events; (6) farmer’s markets; (7) fitness; (8) community and faith-based organizations; (9) guest rooms; (10) indoor malls; (11) indoor venues; (12) movie theatres; (13) outdoor equine and livestock competitions; (14) outdoor venues; (15) personal services; and (16) trade schools and technical schools.

May 29, 2020:

Governor Steve Sisolak released industry-specific guidance on Phase 2 for the following industries to specifically address specific questions businesses may have: (1) aquatics; (2) bars; (3) bowling alleys; (4) camps; (5) closed events; (6) farmer’s markets; (7) fitness; (8) community and faith-based organizations; (9) guest rooms; (10) indoor malls; (11) indoor venues; (12) movie theatres; (13) outdoor equine and livestock competitions; (14) outdoor venues; (15) personal services; and (16) trade schools and technical schools.

May 27, 2020:

Governor Steve Sisolak announced that Nevada is ready to move into Phase 2 of the state’s Nevada United: Roadmap to Recovery reopening plan on Friday, May 29. Phase 2 will allow gatherings of no more than 50 people. Furthermore, in Phase 2, employees will continue to be required to wear a face covering. Similar to Phase 1, the Governor states that Phase 2 will last 2-3 weeks as the Governor monitors the data and evaluate trends and progress.

Businesses that will be required to remain closed during Phase 2 include: (1) adult entertainment establishments; (2) brothels; (3) nightclubs and day clubs; and (4) live sporting event venues and live performance venues with spectators.

Gyms, fitness facilities and other studios may reopen in Phase 2. If a smaller gym or studio can only accommodate 10 or less people, they may only do so if they can adhere to the social distancing requirements and keep 6 feet of distance between all individuals. Aquatic facilities, water parks, and swimming pools may also reopen. Larger gyms are capped at 50% of occupancy per fire code and must also adhere to the strict social. distancing requirements. Additionally, equipment must be regulated to ensure 6 feet of social distancing. Locker rooms shall be closed except for restrooms. Finally, youth sports and recreation will be able to open at some point in Phase 2.

All of the same restrictions on restaurants and food establishments are continued in Phase 2. However, bar areas in restaurants may reopen, and bars/taverns that do not serve food may reopen under the same restrictions as restaurants, with a 50% maximum capacity and strict social distancing. Patrons will not be allowed to walk up and order at the bars, but they may sit and be served at a bar top if appropriately distanced.

Salons and other businesses that provide aesthetic or other skin services may open under strict protocols and social distancing guidelines as recommended. It will be appointment only, and estheticians, technicians, and other employees must wear face coverings. Customers or clients should wear face coverings to the extent practicable.

Museums, art galleries, zoos and aquariums may reopen in Phase 2, at no more than 50% of capacity and must maintain at least 6 feet of social distancing. Interactive and hands-on exhibits must remain closed during this phase. Indoor venues, like movie theaters, bowling alleys and indoor malls may also reopen with the same capacity requirements.

Lastly, casinos and other gaming venues may reopen on June 4.

May 26, 2020:

On May 26, Governor Sisolak held a press conference to discuss the next phase in Nevada’s reopening plan, as outlined in Nevada United: Roadmap to Recovery. He announced that Nevada will move into Phase 2 of the reopening plan on Friday, May 29.

On May 25, the Governor announced that pending the evaluation of trends in Nevada’s COVID-19 data, along with the results of the Gaming Control Board meeting on Tuesday, the Governor has set a target date of June 4, 2020, for reopening Nevada’s gaming industry.

May 19, 2020:

Governor Steve Sisolak announced that Caleb Cage is appointed to serve as the State of Nevada COVID-19 Response Director. Cage, the former head of the State Division of Emergency Management and Homeland Security and most recently the Assistant Vice Chancellor for Workforce Development and Community Colleges at the Nevada System of Higher Education (NSHE), will help direct and coordinate the statewide response to COVID-19 through the end of December from the Office of Governor Steve Sisolak. This position will coordinate resources and the work across multiple state, local and federal entities to respond to COVID-19 and will have a strong emphasis on the following activities: testing effort and capacity; contact tracing; and coordination of resources to support the robust, ongoing and expanding work in these areas in localities and across the State.

May 17, 2020:

On May 15, Governor Steve Sisolak issued new industry-based guidance to help Nevada businesses understand the mandatory practices and recommended best practices under the Roadmap to Recovery for Nevada.

May 15, 2020:

Governor Steve Sisolak announced an update on Phase One of Nevada’s Roadmap to Recovery. Phase One allowed retail businesses, restaurants, barbershops and salons to reopen on Saturday, May 9, with restrictions in place to stem the spread of COVID-19. For example, businesses shall require employees who interact with the public to wear face coverings and should encourage customers to wear face coverings, to the extent practicable.

Businesses that will continue to remain closed through Phase One include: (1) nightclubs; (2) bars, pubs and taverns that do not have a license to serve food; (3) gyms & fitness facilities, including health clubs, yoga, barre and spin facilities; (4) entertainment and recreational activity venues; (5) brothels and houses of prostitution; (6) adult entertainment establishments; (7) spas; (8) aesthetic service establishments, with the exception of nail, hair salons and barber shops; and (9) body art and body piercing establishments. Governor Sisolak announced that gaming will also not reopen in Phase One.

May 13, 2020:

Governor Steve Sisolak declared a state of fiscal emergency arising from the strain the COVID-19 pandemic has put on public services in the State of Nevada.

May 11, 2020:

Governor Steve Sisolak signed Declaration of Emergency Directive 018 to begin re-opening the Nevada economy. Nevadans should still not gather in groups of ten or more people.

Effective May 9, 2020, all businesses that engage in retail sales may, in addition to providing retail sales on a curbside or home delivery basis, allow customer access, with a maximum occupancy of 50% based on listed fire code capacity. Car sales showrooms and restaurants may also open pursuant to 50% of the fire code capacity. Furthermore, nail salons, hair salons, and barbershops may open subject to restrictions. Drive in theaters may resume operations for movies and drive-in religious services under strict social distancing guidelines. However, movie theaters operating on a non-drive-in basis shall remain closed to the public.

The following non-essential businesses shall also remain closed during Phase One of the Nevada United: Roadmap to Recovery Plan: (1) nightclubs; (2) bars, pubs, and taverns not covered by Sections 17 or 18 of this Directive; (3) gyms and fitness facilities; (4) recreation and community centers including public pools; (5) museums and art galleries; (6) zoos and aquariums, but may remain open to staff members to maintain essential operations for the health and safety of animals; (7) entertainment venues, including sports venues, movie theaters with the exception of drive-in theaters covered in Section 14 of this Directive, museums, bowling alleys, arcades and other amusement venues, and miniature golf; (8) brothels; (9) adult entertainment facilities; (10) massage parlors, not to include massages for physical therapy or that are medically necessary as prescribed by a licensed healthcare provider; (11) spas, not to include nail salons, hair salons, and barber shops; (12) body art facilities; (13) body piercing facilities; and (14) tanning salons.

May 3, 2020:

Governor Steve Sisolak has signed an emergency directive to temporarily provide economic relief to Nevadans by freezing some garnishment actions and executions of judgments against bank accounts, including Nevadans receiving CARES Act fund.

May 1, 2020:

Governor Sisolak announced the release of the “Nevada United: Roadmap to Recovery” plan, designed to build a path forward and safely restart Nevada’s economy. The roadmap outlines a coordinated, state-specific plan to address the COVID-19 public health and economic crisis. The plan’s guiding principle is that Nevada’s efforts should be federally supported, state managed, and locally executed.

April 30, 2020:

Governor Steve Sisolak announced a directive extending a majority of the Stay-At-Home measures through mid-May, but will be easing some restrictions starting on May 1, 2020. Nevada will continue to remain under the Stay at Home order, but this new directive will allow Nevadans expanded outdoor and recreational activities and provide some relief for our small business owners. These changes include: (1) all retail businesses will be allowed to operate under curbside commerce models, similar to curbside pickup currently allowed for restaurants and eateries (including cannabis dispensaries); (2) drive-in services are now permitted for places of worship, as long as congregants stay in a vehicle and maintain at least 6 feet of social distance from people not in their household; and (3) relaxes restrictions on outdoor activities, including golf, pickleball, and tennis, as long as they do it safely and in a way that prevents the spread of COVID-19.

All other directives currently in effect will be extended through May 15, or until the state meets the necessary criteria set forth last week and consistent with the White House guidelines to demonstrate the state is making sufficient progress to slow the spread of COVID-19.

April 29, 2020:

Governor Steve Sisolak announced Nevada’s forthcoming reopening plan, named the “Nevada United Road Map to Recovery”, which will start out by allowing hospitals to resume medically necessary procedures before beginning to ease restrictions on retail and outdoor activities. Governor Sisolak stated, “We’re going to loosen up what some of the restrictions are. Unfortunately, we’re going to have to extend the stay-at-home order a little bit because we just have not reached exactly where we want to get in the downward trajectory.” He also added, “The casino and the gaming enterprises will probably come in the third or the fourth phase of what we’re doing here because we’re just not ready yet to handle that type of a volume.” Full details on the “Nevada United Road Map to Recovery” will be released Thursday, April 30, 2020.

April 28, 2020:

Governor Steve Sisolak announced he will be joining California, Oregon, Colorado and Washington in their Western States pact for reopening the state. Currently, Nevada's stay-at-home order is set to go through April 30.

April 22, 2020:

Governor Steve Sisolak had a press conference where he announced the plan was the decision to keep Nevada schools closed and extend distance learning through the duration of the school year. The Governor also announced the criteria for re-opening.

April 9, 2020:

Governor Steve Sisolak ordered publicly accessible sporting and recreational venues that encourage social congregation, including without limitation, golf courses, golf driving ranges, tennis courts, basketball courts, and volleyball courts, closed for the duration of the COVID-19 Declaration of Emergency. Showrooms used to display goods for sale at essential businesses and open house showings, such as in-person showings of single family and multi-family residences currently occupied by renters of real estate on the market for sale, are also closed. Furthermore, places of worship shall not hold in-person worship services where ten or more persons may gather, including without limitation, drive-in and pop-up services. Lastly, persons licensed by the Nevada Board of Cosmetology or State Barbers' Health and Sanitation Board are prohibited from performing in-home beauty services.

April 3, 2020:

Governor Steve Sisolak submitted a formal request to President Donald Trump for a Major Disaster Declaration for the State of Nevada. If approved, this declaration will provide additional federal assistance and emergency protective measures available under the nationwide emergency proclamation.

The Governor also tolled any specific time limit set by state statute or regulation for the commencement of any legal action until 30 days from the date the state of emergency declared on March 12, 2020 is terminated. Governor Sisolak also tolled all licenses and permits issued by the State of Nevada, Boards, Commissions, Agencies, or political subdivisions of the State of Nevada that expire or are set to expire during the period the Declaration of Emergency dated March 12, 2020 is in effect shall be extended for a period of 90 days from the current expiration date, or 90 days from the date the state of emergency declared on March 12, 2020 is terminated, whichever is later, if reduced government operations due to the state of emergency makes timely renewal of the license or permit impracticable or impossible.

He additionally waived and exempted professional licensing requirements for qualified providers of medical services during this declared emergency. This includes providers who currently hold a valid license in good standing in another state, providers of medical services whose licenses currently are suspended due to licensing fee delinquencies, providers of medical services whose licenses currently are suspended for failure to meet continuing medical education requirements, and providers of medical services who have retired from their practice in any state with their license in good standing.

April 1, 2020:

On March 29, Emergency Directive 008 went into effect. The Oder prohibiting evictions or foreclosure actions until the state of emergency declared on March 12, 2020 terminates or expires.

March 18, 2020:

Governor Steve Sisolak waived the work search requirement and the 7-day waiting period for unemployment insurance benefits.

March 17, 2020: 

Governor Steve Sisolak directed all Nevadans to stay home and for all “non-essential businesses” to close to the public for 30 days.

“Essential businesses” comprise of fire, police, transit, and healthcare services, in addition to businesses that provide food, shelter, or social services for disadvantaged populations. Examples include pharmacies, grocery stores, drug and convenience stores, banks and financial institutions, hardware stores, and gas stations.

Furthermore, the Directive notes, “The construction, mining, manufacturing, and infrastructure sector labor force may continue operations, but shall maintain strict social distancing practices to facilitate a minimum of six feet of separation between workers, and to adopt policies and practices that ensure minimum contact between the workforce and the general public.”

The Directive also states it will not hinder the U.S. Department of Homeland Security Cyber & Infrastructure Security Agency’s “Essential Critical Infrastructure Workforce” (CISA) memorandum, and the Directive is to account for the CISA and consumer protection guidance. The CISA memorandum identifies “essential” workers such as those essential to continued critical infrastructure viability, including staffing operations centers, maintaining and repairing critical infrastructure, operating call centers, working construction, and performing management functions, among others. The industries they support represent, but are not necessarily limited to, medical and healthcare, telecommunications, information technology systems, defense, food and agriculture, transportation and logistics, energy, water and wastewater, law enforcement, and public works.

While in operation, “essential businesses” must adopt risk mitigation measures that reduce the risk of community spread. In particular, restaurants must be limited to drive-thru, take-out, or delivery.

The following were listed as “non-essential businesses”: gyms, casinos, beauty and grooming businesses, community recreation centers, clubhouses, movie theaters, malls, and more.

Businesses that do not comply with this Directive or regulations promulgated under the Directive, after receiving written notice from law enforcement, may be subject to criminal prosecution and civil penalties.

March 15, 2020: 

Governor Steve Sisolak closed all K-12 schools for the next three weeks, through April 6, with further closures possible.

March 12, 2020: 

Governor Steve Sisolak issued a Declaration of Emergency in the State of Nevada.

March 5, 2020: 

Governor Steve Sisolak announced the adoption of an emergency regulation to ensure that Nevadans covered by health insurance policies are able to obtain medical services and prescriptions related to COVID-19 at their normal costs.

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