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State-by-State COVID-19 Guidance

Assisting businesses with evolving COVID-19 orders and helping them return to work.

Husch Blackwell has developed this resource center to monitor and update the rapidly evolving COVID-19 rules, restrictions, orders and guidance that affect how and when businesses across the country can reopen their workplaces to employees, clients and customers. These state and local measures cover a range of issues, including business restrictions, gathering limitations, and full-scale shelter-in-place orders. Each jurisdiction is on a different timeline regarding the expiration of orders and the re-opening of their economies.

Choose from the state map below to access the latest information in that state and/or key localities inside that state. For assistance in working with states to ensure your business operations can continue, our government affairs team at Husch Blackwell Strategies can assist you with working to make sure any future orders cover your specific business. We will update this resource center daily as new information and guidance is released.

   

State-by-State Map of COVID-19 Guidance

Please click on the state you are interested in to view state-specific COVID-19 information.

State & Local COVID-19 Update for January 25, 2021

(current as of 7:00 p.m. CST)

California:

On January 25, the CDPH announced that they are lifting the Regional Stay at Home Order enacted on December 3, 2020. This action comes after the projected ICU availability rose above 15% in all regions. Upon the expiration of the Regional Stay at Home Order, counties will return to their assigned tiers under the Blueprint for a Safer Economy.

Additionally, Governor Newsom announced several improvements to the state’s vaccination plan. The improvements are aimed at making it easier for people to know when that are eligible for vaccination, accelerating the administration of vaccinations, and improving vaccination data.

The state will continue to issue vaccines to individuals 65+ and health care workers and will prioritize emergency services workers, food and agriculture workers, teachers, and school staff. Once the state can expand distribution of the vaccine, the state will transition to an age-based eligibility system with a specific focus on communities that have been disproportionately impacted by COVID -19.

On January 21, Governor Newsom signed Executive Order N-01-21 effective January 21, 2021. The order extends the validity of medical cannabis identification cards that would have otherwise expired on or after March 4, 2020, citing the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic.

January 12, the CDPH expanded vaccine eligibility to include Seniors 65+. However, those individuals slated to receive the vaccine in Phase 1A—namely, health care workers and long-term care residents—remain the highest priority at this time. While demand for the vaccine continues to exceed supply, Governor Newsom has announced a new notification system set to roll out next week. The new system will notify people eligible to receive the vaccine, and if not yet eligible, will allow for them to register for a notification via email or text when they become eligible.

District of Columbia:

On January 21, Mayor Bowser announced that beginning on January 22, restaurants can allow indoor dining at 25% capacity or no more than 250 people, whichever is fewer people. Additionally, museums can open, but may allow no more than 250 people per floor and may not conduct guided tours.

On January 25, Mayor Bowser delivered the Coronavirus Situational Report, reporting that as of January 23, 51,421 doses of vaccine had already been administered in Washington, D.C. and that 9,475 doses of vaccine are becoming available this week.

Florida:

The Florida Department of Health issued a Public Health Advisory which recommends that vaccine providers ensure the recipient of a COVID-19 vaccine is a resident of Florida under Fla. Stat. § 381.968(5)(b), or is present in Florida for the purpose of providing health care services involving direct contact with patients, prior to administering a vaccine dose.

(Miami-Dade County): Mayor Daniella Levine Cava issued an Executive Order which requires hospital systems, municipalities that receive vaccines, or other entities that distribute vaccines, to report vaccine related information specific to Miami-Dade County—including total doses on hand, sources, administration sites, total vaccines administered, appointments available, and the demographics of those vaccinated, among other things—to the County. Hospitals systems and other entities that dispense vaccines should not provide vaccination appointments unless they have received vaccine doses and have a reasonably accurate forecast of the number of persons who can be vaccinated with the supply. The order takes effect on Saturday, January 23, 2021, and expires with the expiration of the County state of local emergency.

(Miami-Dade County): Mayor Daniella Levine Cava issued an Executive Order further extending the state of local emergency for an additional 7-day period, beginning on January 21, 2021.

(Broward County): County Administrator, Bertha Henry, issued a Declaration of Emergency, further extending the local State of Emergency for 7 days, starting at 9:00 a.m. on January 26, 2021.

(Palm Beach County): County Administrator, Verdenia Baker, issued Emergency Order No. 2021-001, which extends Emergency Order 2020-012 (requiring the use of facial coverings in all businesses, establishments, and public spaces), until 12:01 a.m. on February 19, 2021. Mayor Kerner also issued a Declaration of Continuing State of Emergency further extending the state of local emergency through January 29, 2021.

Hawaii:

(Maui County): With Governor Ige’s approval, Mayor Victorino issued Amended Public Health Emergency Rules, which clarify that face coverings must be worn while walking to and from the pool or beach area, and may only be removed once the person is stationary and adequately separated from non-household members. The rule also adds gas stations to the list of facilities to which face coverings are required, and to which the Maui County exception does not apply. Unless a more specific limit applies, essential or designated retail businesses must limit total occupancy to 30% of the maximum occupancy. Businesses or designated operations are required to refuse entry to persons not wearing face coverings, unless an exception applies, and failure to enforce the Rules may be subject to enforcement including fines and mandatory closure. The order further amends the self-quarantine period for travelers to 10 days, consistent with Governor Ige’s Seventeenth Emergency Proclamation. The Rules further detail the requirements for travelers who wish to enter the county, including the requirement that they be registered on an exposure notification system. The rules take effect on January 19, 2021.

Illinois:

The Illinois Department of Public Health (IDPH) announced that Region 6 (encompassing Champaign, Clark, Clay, Coles, Crawford, Cumberland, De Witt, Douglas, Edgar, Effingham, Fayette, Ford, Iroquois, Jasper, Lawrence, Macon, Moultrie, Piatt, Richland, Shelby, and Vermillion) is returning to Phase 4 of the state’s restore plan. In order to move to Phase 4, a region must meet the following metrics:

  • A test positivity rate less ≤6.5 percent for three consecutive days, as measured by the 7-day rolling average; AND
  • ≥20 percent available staffed ICU hospital beds for three consecutive days, on a 7-day rolling average; AND
  • No sustained increase in the number of people in the hospital with COVID-19 for seven out of 10 days, on a 7-day average.

Phase 4 is the revitalization stage of the Restore Illinois plan. Regions under Phase 4 may reopen select indoor recreation facilities to operate at either 50 customers or 50% of facility capacity, whichever is lower, meetings and social events are restricted to 50 people or less, indoor dining and drinking is permitted, and all manufacturing is open with IDPH approved safety guidance.

IDPH also announced that Region 7 (Kankakee and Will) is advancing to Tier 1. In order to move to Tier 1 mitigations, a region must meet the following metrics:

  • A test positivity rate between 6.5 and 8% for three consecutive days, as measured by the 7-day rolling average; AND
  • ≥20% available staffed ICU hospital beds for three consecutive days, on a 7-day rolling average; AND
  • No sustained increase in the number of people in the hospital with COVID-19 for seven out of 10 days, on a 7-day average

Tier 1 mitigations are applied to regions experiencing a resurgence of COVID-19. Regions under Tier 1 must adhere to the following mitigations, among others:

  • Bars and restaurants must close at 11:00 p.m. and may reopen no earlier than 6am the following day
  • Indoor service is limited to the lesser of 25 guests or 25% capacity
  • Establishments offering indoor service must serve food
  • Meetings and social events are limited to the lesser of 25 guests or 25% capacity both indoors and outdoors (not applicable to students participating in in-person classroom learning or sports)
  • Sports and other organized group recreational activities should follow the mitigation measures set forth in the All Sport Guidelines
  • Face coverings must be worn at all times in fitness centers

On January 22, the Illinois Department of Public Health (IDPH) announced that Region 4 (encompassing Bond, Clinton, Madison, Monroe, Randolph, St. Clair, and Washington counties) is moving to Tier 2 mitigations. In order to move to Tier 2 mitigations, a region must meet the following metrics:

  • Test positivity rate ≥ 8% and below 12% for three consecutive days (7-day average); AND
  • Staffed ICU bed availability ≥ 20% for three consecutive days (7-day average); AND
  • Sustained decline in COVID patients in hospital (7-day average for 7 of 10 days)

Tier 2 mitigations are applied to regions experiencing a resurgence of COVID-19. Notable restrictions under the Tier 2 Mitigation Measures include:

  • No indoor service or dining at bars or restaurants
  • Meetings, social events and gatherings, both indoor and outdoor, are limited to 10 guests

The Illinois Department of Public Health (IDPH) announced that Region 10 (suburban Cook county) and Region 11 (city of Chicago) are moving to Tier 1 mitigations. In order to move into Tier 1 mitigations, a region must meet the following metrics:

  • Test positivity rate between 6.5% and 8% for three consecutive days (7-day average); AND
  • Staffed ICU bed availability ≥ 20% for three consecutive days (7-day average); AND
  • No sustained increase in COVID patients in hospital (7-day average for 7 of 10 days)

Tier 1 mitigations are applied to regions experiencing a resurgence of COVID-19. Notable restrictions under Tier 1 Mitigation Measures include:

  • Bars and restaurants must close at 11:00 p.m. and may reopen no earlier than 6am the following day
  • Indoor service is limited to the lesser of 25 guests or 25% capacity
  • Establishments offering indoor service must serve food
  • Meetings and social events are limited to the lesser of 25 guests or 25% capacity both indoors and outdoors (not applicable to students participating in in-person classroom learning or sports)
  • Sports and other organized group recreational activities should follow the mitigation measures set forth in the All Sport Guidelines
  • Face coverings must be worn at all times in fitness centers

On January 25, the Illinois Department of Public Health (IDPH) announced that Region 1 (Boone, Carroll, DeKalb, Jo Daviess, Lee, Ogle, Stephenson, Whiteside, and Winnebago counties) and Region 2 (Bureau, Fulton, Grundy, Henderson, Henry, Warren, and Woodford counties) are moving to Phase 4 of the Restore Illinois Plan. In order to move into Phase 4, a region must meet the following metrics:

  • A test positivity rate less ≤6.5 percent for three consecutive days, as measured by the 7-day rolling average; AND
  • ≥20 percent available staffed ICU hospital beds for three consecutive days, on a 7-day rolling average; AND
  • No sustained increase in the number of people in the hospital with COVID-19 for seven out of 10 days, on a 7-day average.

Phase 4 is the revitalization stage of the Restore Illinois plan. Notably, in returning to Phase 4, Regions 1 and 2 will see gatherings of 50 people or fewer allowed. Additionally, various businesses will see the easing of restrictions as follows:

  • Manufacturing: All manufacturing open with IDPH approved safety guidance.
  • “Non-essential” businesses: All employees return to work with IDPH approved safety guidance; Employers are encouraged to provide accommodations for COVID-19-vulnerable employees.
  • Bars and restaurants: Open with capacity limits and IDPH approved safety guidance.
  • Personal care services and health clubs: All barbershops, salons, spas and health and fitness clubs open with capacity limits and IDPH approved safety guidance.
  • Entertainment: Cinema and theaters open with capacity limits and IDPH approved safety guidance.
  • Retail: Open with capacity limits and IDPH approved safety guidance.

Illinois and Chicago enter the next phase of their vaccination plans, Phase 1B. Phase 1B includes persons aged 65 years and older, frontline essential workers, and inmates. Essential workers include:

  • First Responders - Fire, law enforcement, 911 workers, security personnel, school officers
  • Education – Teachers, principals, student support, student aids, day care workers
  • Food and Agriculture – Processing, plants, veterinary health, livestock services, animal care
  • Manufacturing – Industrial production of good for distribution to retail, wholesale or other manufactures
  • Corrections Workers and Inmates – Prison/jail officers, juvenile facility staff, workers providing in person support, inmates
  • United State Postal Services Workers
  • Public Transit Workers – Flight crew, bus drivers, train conductors, taxi drivers, paratransit drivers, in person support, ride sharing services
  • Grocery Store Workers – Baggers, cashiers, stockers, pick-up, customer service
  • Shelters/Adult Day Care – Homeless shelter, women's shelter, adult day/drop-in program, sheltered workshop, psycho social rehab

(Chicago): Chicago Mayor Lori Lightfoot and the Chicago Department of Public Health announced new initiatives to address racial equity in the COVID-19 vaccine distribution as Chicago moves into Phase 1B. The plan includes 3 main strategies:

  • Target 15 high-need communities based on the City’s COVID vulnerability index;
  • Partner with community stakeholders to push vaccines and the City resources directly to these communities;
  • Work with community stakeholders to identify settings and groups where vaccine access will most quickly decrease COVID transmission risk and remove barriers to vaccinating these individuals as quickly as possible.

Indiana:

Governor Holcomb signed Executive Order 21-01, the second extension of Executive Order 20-50. Effective at 12:01 a.m. on January 25, 2021, Executive Order 20-50 – which lays out the county-based measures and restrictions based on the impact and spread of the coronavirus disease – will be extended and remain in effect until January 31, 2021. However, the extension is subject to the following modifications:

  • Hospitals are directed to implement evidenced-based criteria to ensure sufficient capacity to care for all patients and should reprioritize or postpone non-emergent surgeries or procedures.
  • Counties, political subdivisions, local government entities, or school corporation may impose more stringent requirements, but not less stringent requirements.

Iowa:

On January 22, Governor Reynolds announced the reallocation of $17 million in relief funds that have been made available to local governments for direct expenses incurred in response to COVID-19. The funds will now be allocated at the county level, rather than the city level to simplify the administration of distribution. Counties do not need to reapply for funds as a result of the reallocation. The new allocation of funds by county can be found here.

Additionally, Iowa Department of Public Health (“IDPH”) has announced that Phase 1B of COVID-19 vaccinations will begin on February 1, 2021. Due to the short supply of vaccines, IDPH has implemented a tiered prioritization of Phase 1B populations. Phase 1B vaccinations will be given to persons aged 65 years or older (who may receive the vaccine without regard to whether they belong to any tier) and certain high-risk persons in the following order:

  • Tier 1: first responders (including firefighters police officer, and child welfare social workers), PK-12 staff, and early education and childcare workers
  • Tier 2: frontline essential workers in food, agriculture, distribution, and manufacturing sectors who live or work in non-social distanced settings, and individuals with disabilities living in home settings and their direct care staff
  • Tier 3: staff and individuals living in congregate settings not covered by a previous Phase or Tier (excepting college dormitories), and government officials and staff engaged in business at the State Capitol
  • Tier 4: inspectors responsible for health, life, and safety
  • Tier 5: correctional facility staff and incarcerated individuals

Kansas:

On January 25, Governor Kelly signed Senate Bill 14 into law, extending the State of Disaster Emergency Declaration to March 31, 2021, and allowing for the continuation of certain resources, support, and regulations critical to Kansas’ COVID-19 response efforts.

Among other resources and support, the disaster declaration allows Kansas to provide community-based COVID-19 testing, provide support to food banks and pantries, and provide hospitals and first responders with Personal Protective Equipment.

Though there are a number of COVID-19 response measures contained in SB 14, the key provision extends the current emergency declaration to March 31, 2021, providing a measure of stability and certainty for the state’s ongoing emergency response efforts.

The bill also contains the provisions of a number of executive orders that the Governor has issued during the pandemic, such as allowing establishments to continue the sale of alcoholic beverages for carryout consumption, expanding the ability of physicians to use telemedicine, and providing for temporary suspension of certain healthcare professional licensing and practice requirements.

(Dodge City): On January 21, officials in Dodge City announced they have rescinded their mask ordinance, saying it was effective at lowering the rate of new COVID-19 cases.

Kentucky:

On January 25, Governor Beshear announced that 1,268 new virus cases have been reported statewide, the lowest in the past 4 weeks. The Governor was cautious warning that Monday case numbers are typically lower.

The Governor also announced that last week, the state vaccinated 82,511 people, which is the new record for the most Kentuckians vaccinated in one week. The Governor cautioned that demand is still outpacing supply in Kentucky.

Louisiana:

On January 22, the Louisiana Department of Public Health released a testing schedule for sites operated by the Louisiana National Guard. Individuals are encouraged to pre-register.

Furthermore, Governor Edwards announced that the state has launched the app Covid Defense which allows users to receive notifications informing them if there is a risk they were exposed to someone who has tested positive for the virus. The app can be downloaded on Android or Apple.

On January 25, the Louisiana Department of Public Health announced that 324 vaccine providers will receive COVID vaccinations the week of January 25-January 31.

Maryland:

On January 21, Governor Hogan and the State Superintendent of Schools called for all Maryland school systems to return to hybrid instruction to include a combination of in-person and virtual learning, no later than March 1. State health officials have provided school systems with additional school reopening school guidance and educational design options based on scientific evidence, recent studies on the impact of school reopening on community transmission, and the effects of school closures on children and learning. State health officials recommend daily in-person learning for students with disabilities and special learning needs, phased daily in-person learning for elementary students, and hybrid learning for secondary students.

On January 25, Governor Hogan announced an additional $20.7 million in education relief funding for education as school systems work to get students safely back into classrooms. The funding includes $10 million in Competitive Innovation Grants, $7.4 million in Community College Workforce Development Programs, $2.6 million to independent colleges, and over $700,000 to schools for the blind and deaf.

Michigan:

Director Gordon, of the Michigan Department of Health and Human Services, signed an updated Gatherings and Face Mask Order, effective February 1, 2021. The order, which will remain in effect until February 21, 2021, has the following restrictions:

  • Indoor gatherings can have no more than 10 people from no more than 2 households;
  • Outdoor gatherings at residential venues can have no more than 25 people from no more than 3 households; outdoor gatherings at non-residential venues are limited based on the amount of fixed seating and capacity of the venue;
  • Gatherings at entertainment facilities, recreational facilities, and food service establishments are subject to further restriction;
  • Retail stores, libraries, and museums cannot exceed 30% of total occupancy limits; exercise facilities cannot exceed 25% of the total occupancy limits;
  • Schools, colleges, technical schools, and universities are allowed to hold in-person classes and other events sponsored by the educational institution, except for extracurricular activities that involve physical contact and where masks cannot be worn;
  • Organized sports are prohibited unless all participants, teams, and venues comply with the enhanced testing regimen specified in the Testing and Additional Mitigation Measures for Athletic Practice and Play During Statewide Athletics ‘Pause’ section of MDHHS’s document entitled Interim Guidance for Athletics;
  • All persons participating in gatherings are required to wear a face mask, unless an exception applies;
  • Certain facilities and businesses are prohibited from operating unless the facility maintains accurate contact-tracing records, including date and time of entry, names of patron, and contact information.

New Hampshire:

On January 22, Governor Sununu issued Executive Order 2021-1 extending the State of Emergency declared in Executive Order 2020-04 and Emergency Order #83 regarding temporary provisions to respond to timing challenges related to the enactment of Senate Bill 2 in the 2021 Legislative Session, as part of the state’s efforts to combat COVID-19.

North Carolina:

On January 23, North Carolina health officials confirmed that the new strain of COVID-19 has been detected in the state -- specifically, in Mecklenburg County. The new strain, called B.1.1.7, was first detected in the United Kingdom in December. According to NCDHHS, there are 195 cases of B.1.1.7 in the US in 21 states as of Friday.

Health officials said early data suggest that this new strain may be more contagious than the first strain of coronavirus. Current COVID-19 vaccines are expected to be effective against the new strain.

Ohio:

On January 21, Governor DeWine discussed the vaccine distribution for Phase 1B, which began this week for those ages 80 and up. Beginning next week, vaccinations are anticipated to begin for those ages 75 and up. Vaccinations will also be available to those with severe congenital, developmental, or early-onset medical disorders, and who have a developmental or intellectual disability.

A representative from the local county developmental disabilities board will reach out to help coordinate receipt of the vaccination for Ohioans with severe congenital, developmental, or early-onset medical disorders, as well as a developmental or intellectual disability.

Governor DeWine also announced that the state is purchasing 2 million at-home, rapid COVID-19 test using telehealth services where the results are delivered in minutes without the need to send the test to a lab for processing. Developed by Abbott, BinaxNOW is an easy-to-use antigen test that detects the virus when people are most infectious.

To facilitate the delivery of the BinaxNOW test to the home and the guided collection and testing process, Abbott has partnered with digital health solutions provider eMed™, who will deliver people their results through Abbott’s complementary NAVICA™ app in a matter of minutes. eMed™ will report the rapid test results in the electronic lab reporting system.

Furthermore, Governor DeWine announced that the Ohio Department of Health will extend Ohio's 10:00 p.m. to 5:00 a.m. curfew. Additional details will be forthcoming. The curfew does not apply to those going to and from work, those who have an emergency, or those who need medical care. The curfew is not intended to stop anyone from getting groceries or going to the pharmacy. Picking up carry-out or a drive-thru meal and ordering for delivery is permitted, but serving food and drink within an establishment must cease at 10:00 p.m.

On January 22, Governor DeWine also signed an Executive Order reinstating funding to schools, colleges and universities, as they are returning to in-person learning.

South Carolina:

Governor McMaster issued Executive Order 2021–07 on January 22. Effective immediately until February 6, this Executive Order continues the State of Emergency for 15 days and declares that Executive Order No. 2020–73 (Modifying Amending Emergency Measures) is extended for the duration of the State of Emergency. First responders and 911 operators are still allowed to ask individuals requesting assistance whether they have been exposed to COVID-19. All transportation waivers for commercial vehicles and operators of commercial vehicles are still in effect.

Tennessee:

On January 19, Governor Lee signed Executive Order 74, which encouraged Tennesseans to work from home when possible, encouraged places of worship, weddings, and funerals to continue to use virtual or online services, gave local education agencies the authority to permit school sponsored sporting events and activities as long as they are conducted in a manner consistent with COVID-19 related guidance and rules adopted by the Tennessee Secondary Schools Athletic Association, with respect to school-sponsored and other youth athletics, schools, organizers, and facilities shall not permit spectators to attend practices, games, or competition, but spectators may be present in the facility. Collegiate and professional sporting events must follow the rules of their respective institutions and governing bodies.

Texas:

On January 20, Governor Abbott announced that the Texas Division of Emergency Management has established a new COVID-19 therapeutic infusion center in Lubbock. The infusion center will begin accepting patients Thursday and has been provided with Regeneron's monoclonal antibodies and Bamlanivimab to treat outpatient cases of COVID-19 who meet certain criteria and who have a referral from a hospital or doctor. Previous infusion centers have been established in El Paso, Laredo, Harlingen, Austin, Fort Worth, Irving and more to help communities combat COVID-19 and reduce hospitalizations.

Vermont:

On January 22, the Vermont Department of Public Health announced the launch of a new web page where Vermonters age 75 and older will be able to book an appointment for their COVID-19 vaccine, starting Monday, Jan 25.

Washington:

The Washington State Department of Health announced that none of the eight regions were eligible to move to Phase 2 as part of Governor Inslee’s Roadmap to Recovery plan for the week of January 25, 2021. The regions will be reassessed each Friday and must show a decrease in per-capita COVID-19 case rates, per-capita COVID-19 hospitalizations, occupancy of ICU beds, and COVID-19 test positivity rates.

Wisconsin:

The Wisconsin Department of Health Services announced starting January 25, 2021 adults over the age of 65 will be eligible for COVID-19 vaccinations. Eligible adults can receive the vaccine through their health care provider. At this time, other vaccine eligible populations include frontline health care personnel, residents in skilled nursing and long-term care facilities, police and fire personnel, and correctional staff. The approximate population of 65 and older Wisconsinites is 700,000. Wisconsin currently receives roughly 70,000 first-dose vaccines per week from the federal government.

Wyoming:

On January 2, Wyoming’s State Health Officer Alexia Harrist extended Governor Gordon’s mandatory face coverings initially set to expire today. The new orders are effective through February 14, 2021. The health order continues to require that face coverings be worn in various settings, including businesses, state buildings, and healthcare facilities. Additionally, the requirement covers individuals waiting for or riding public transportation, including ride share services, and the drivers of these services. Previous orders addressing restaurants, schools, gymnasiums, personal service businesses, and statewide gatherings are also now set expire on February 14, 2021.

Back to the top | View the Aggregated List of Daily Updates

Key contacts:
 

Catherine Hanaway, Partner, Technology, Manufacturing & Transportation, St. Louis, MO.
Seth Mailhot, Partner, Food & Agribusiness, Washington, DC.
Lowell Pearson, Partner, Technology, Manufacturing & Transportation, Jefferson City, MO.
Steve Laabs, Partner, Financial Services & Capital Markets, Milwaukee, WI.
Wendy Proctor, Partner, Real Estate, Development & Construction, Chattanooga, TN.
Kirstin Salzman, Partner, Healthcare, Life Sciences & Education, Kansas City, MO. 
Donna Pryor, Partner, Energy & Natural Resources, Denver, CO. 
Kyle Gilster, Partner, Financial Services & Capital Markets, Washington, DC.
Natalie Holden, Associate, Litigation & Alternative Dispute Resolution, Kansas City, MO
David Lopez, Senior Associate, Real Estate, Development & Construction, Omaha, NE


The COVID-19 situation is fluid and fast-changing at all levels of government. New orders, regulations, restrictions, and guidance are being issued by federal, state, and local governments on a daily basis. Husch Blackwell LLP does not guarantee the accuracy or timeliness of the information contained herein. You should consult directly with counsel for the latest developments.

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